CBP Completes Phase II of the Body-Worn Camera Feasibility Study




Release Date: July 23, 2015



As part of U.S. Customs and Border Protections continued emphasis on transparency and accountability, the agency has completed the second phase of its body-worn camera feasibility study. CBP is conducting the study to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating body-worn camera technology into CBPs law enforcement operations in each of its operational environments along the U.S. border: at and between ports of entry, in the air and at sea.


Following a 2013 comprehensive review of CBPs Use of Force policy, Commissioner Kerlikowske chartered an agency-wide working group to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating body-worn camera technology into CBPs law enforcement operations.  Body-worn cameras are viewed as a potential tool that may help CBP continue its progress toward greater transparency and accountability.


During Phase II in a limited field deployment, CBP evaluated the body-worn camera technology in the land, air and maritime environments in which CBP agents and officers work.  Locations included El Paso, Texas; Seattle; Blaine, Washington; West Palm Beach, Florida; and Detroit, Michigan.  Phase II ran from January to May 2015.


Throughout the feasibility study, discussions with unions representing the CBP labor force were ongoing to ensure that issues and concerns are addressed and evaluated.


With the completion of Phase II, the working group is in the process of completing a report for the Commissioner to assess the path forward for CBP.




U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation's borders at and between the official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.