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Thread: hate crimes

  1. #1
    From the Borderline to the Colorline: A Report on Anti-Immigrant Racism in the United States, finds that a disturbing pattern of racism against immigrants is on the rise in the United States. Based on a nationwide survey of conditions for immigrant communities conducted by twenty-five organizations, this groundbreaking report concludes that anti-immigrant racism poses significant barriers to equality and inclusion for citizens and non-citizens alike.



    This report is the first comprehensive assessment of its kind, and will be delivered to the United Nations World Conference Against Racism, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance in Durban, South Africa by a delegation over 50 U.S. immigrant leaders. Through an in-depth look at key areas, such as work and housing as well as recent incidents of hate violence, this survey finds that anti-immigrant racism imperils the lives and well-being of a growing sector of the U.S. population.



    New U.S. Census figures show that immigration is changing the racial character of the United States. However, most discussions of racism in the United States leave immigrants out of the picture. From the Borderline to the Colorline finds that immigrants in the U.S. face a rising tide of racial discrimination because of the color of their skin, accent, or national origin. In addition, those who are perceived to "look like immigrants," including U.S.-born people of color are subjected to the double blows of racism and xenophobia.



    This report not only addresses anti-immigrant racism as it plays out in community relations. It also concludes that, nearly 120 years after the Chinese Exclusion Act, immigration policy continues to reflect racial bias. The report points to a disturbing pattern or racism visible in the application of U.S. immigration laws, and concludes that those who are African, Asian, Latino, or Caribbean are more often detained, deported, and denied legal status and protections.



    In particular, the US government has implemented a program of anti-immigrant legislation that justifies racial discrimination against immigrants, both by law enforcement officials and civilians. The climate of racial hostility towards immigrants is fostered by laws and practices that effectively tolerate racial discrimination in the workplace, in civil society, in schools, in access to social services, and in access to legal protections.



    Based on testimony and accounts of immigrants in 20 cities throughout the United States, the report finds:



    Immigrants are increasingly the targets of racial profiling by law enforcement officials. Law enforcement officers routinely stop and harass Latinos, Africans and others because they "look like immigrants."

    Immigrants of color are often victims of hate crimes, where they are targets of civilians acting on racist and xenophobic motives legitimized by the state. Legal definitions for hate crimes, in the states where such legislation exists, do not extend to anti-immigrant bias.

    Anti-immigrant racism imperils lives. Immigrants have been increasingly subject to violence, and even death, due to racist hostility and biased immigration policies.

    Immigrants, and those perceived as immigrants due to their race, continue to suffer from employment discrimination. Legislative provisions written to safeguard workers who appear "foreign" from discrimination, remain unenforced. Immigrant workers also remain vulnerable to workplace abuse and exploitation, and often face greater challenges in attempting to fight for fair working conditions.

    Heightened military and law enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border have escalated human rights abuses of migrants and people of color in the Southwest and other regions of the United States.

    Immigrants and refugees suffer unequal treatment within legal and criminal justice systems and face standards of evidence and punishment unequal to those of citizens. Legislation impacting immigrants in 1996 created a distinct standard of rights and protections for migrants, including access to judicial review, due process, and equal protection.

    Immigrants and refugees are the fastest-growing incarcerated population in the U.S.



    Recommendations:

    In addition to its participation in the UN World Conference Against Racism, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance, the US will undergo review by the UN Committee for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. This body enforces the International Convention Against Racial Discrimination, to which the US is a signator. In light of this, this report calls upon the United States government and other member nations of the United Nations to:



    Ratify or accede to the U.N. International Convention for the Protection of the Rights of All Migrants and Members of Their Families.



    Remove all reservations and fully implement the International Convention for the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and ratify or accede to all international instruments for the protection of human rights.



    Recognize the right of mobility and return for all displaced peoples, refugees, asylum seekers, trafficked persons, and migrants, affirming their human rights.



    Implement multilateral amnesty or legalization programs to regularize the status of all migrant workers; and end policies that punish and criminalize immigrants.



    Recognize the inter-connections between globalization, displacement, and migration and affirm the right of workers to cross international borders.



    Recognize the right of all people to sustainable social and economic development and stable healthy community recognizing that societies are multi-cultural, multi-racial, multi-ethnic, and multi-religious, with respect for the human rights and dignity of all so that migration is not the only option for survival.



    The report further recommends that the U.S.



    Stop employment discrimination and uphold the rights of immigrant workers


    Uphold the rights of immigrants to due process and equality before the law


    Stop hate crimes against immigrants


    End Law Enforcement and Human Rights Abuses at the US-Mexico Border


    Uphold the Economic, Social, Political, and Cultural Rights of Immigrants, Refugees, Asylum-Seekers, and Trafficked Persons

  2. #2
    From the Borderline to the Colorline: A Report on Anti-Immigrant Racism in the United States, finds that a disturbing pattern of racism against immigrants is on the rise in the United States. Based on a nationwide survey of conditions for immigrant communities conducted by twenty-five organizations, this groundbreaking report concludes that anti-immigrant racism poses significant barriers to equality and inclusion for citizens and non-citizens alike.



    This report is the first comprehensive assessment of its kind, and will be delivered to the United Nations World Conference Against Racism, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance in Durban, South Africa by a delegation over 50 U.S. immigrant leaders. Through an in-depth look at key areas, such as work and housing as well as recent incidents of hate violence, this survey finds that anti-immigrant racism imperils the lives and well-being of a growing sector of the U.S. population.



    New U.S. Census figures show that immigration is changing the racial character of the United States. However, most discussions of racism in the United States leave immigrants out of the picture. From the Borderline to the Colorline finds that immigrants in the U.S. face a rising tide of racial discrimination because of the color of their skin, accent, or national origin. In addition, those who are perceived to "look like immigrants," including U.S.-born people of color are subjected to the double blows of racism and xenophobia.



    This report not only addresses anti-immigrant racism as it plays out in community relations. It also concludes that, nearly 120 years after the Chinese Exclusion Act, immigration policy continues to reflect racial bias. The report points to a disturbing pattern or racism visible in the application of U.S. immigration laws, and concludes that those who are African, Asian, Latino, or Caribbean are more often detained, deported, and denied legal status and protections.



    In particular, the US government has implemented a program of anti-immigrant legislation that justifies racial discrimination against immigrants, both by law enforcement officials and civilians. The climate of racial hostility towards immigrants is fostered by laws and practices that effectively tolerate racial discrimination in the workplace, in civil society, in schools, in access to social services, and in access to legal protections.



    Based on testimony and accounts of immigrants in 20 cities throughout the United States, the report finds:



    Immigrants are increasingly the targets of racial profiling by law enforcement officials. Law enforcement officers routinely stop and harass Latinos, Africans and others because they "look like immigrants."

    Immigrants of color are often victims of hate crimes, where they are targets of civilians acting on racist and xenophobic motives legitimized by the state. Legal definitions for hate crimes, in the states where such legislation exists, do not extend to anti-immigrant bias.

    Anti-immigrant racism imperils lives. Immigrants have been increasingly subject to violence, and even death, due to racist hostility and biased immigration policies.

    Immigrants, and those perceived as immigrants due to their race, continue to suffer from employment discrimination. Legislative provisions written to safeguard workers who appear "foreign" from discrimination, remain unenforced. Immigrant workers also remain vulnerable to workplace abuse and exploitation, and often face greater challenges in attempting to fight for fair working conditions.

    Heightened military and law enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border have escalated human rights abuses of migrants and people of color in the Southwest and other regions of the United States.

    Immigrants and refugees suffer unequal treatment within legal and criminal justice systems and face standards of evidence and punishment unequal to those of citizens. Legislation impacting immigrants in 1996 created a distinct standard of rights and protections for migrants, including access to judicial review, due process, and equal protection.

    Immigrants and refugees are the fastest-growing incarcerated population in the U.S.



    Recommendations:

    In addition to its participation in the UN World Conference Against Racism, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance, the US will undergo review by the UN Committee for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. This body enforces the International Convention Against Racial Discrimination, to which the US is a signator. In light of this, this report calls upon the United States government and other member nations of the United Nations to:



    Ratify or accede to the U.N. International Convention for the Protection of the Rights of All Migrants and Members of Their Families.



    Remove all reservations and fully implement the International Convention for the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and ratify or accede to all international instruments for the protection of human rights.



    Recognize the right of mobility and return for all displaced peoples, refugees, asylum seekers, trafficked persons, and migrants, affirming their human rights.



    Implement multilateral amnesty or legalization programs to regularize the status of all migrant workers; and end policies that punish and criminalize immigrants.



    Recognize the inter-connections between globalization, displacement, and migration and affirm the right of workers to cross international borders.



    Recognize the right of all people to sustainable social and economic development and stable healthy community recognizing that societies are multi-cultural, multi-racial, multi-ethnic, and multi-religious, with respect for the human rights and dignity of all so that migration is not the only option for survival.



    The report further recommends that the U.S.



    Stop employment discrimination and uphold the rights of immigrant workers


    Uphold the rights of immigrants to due process and equality before the law


    Stop hate crimes against immigrants


    End Law Enforcement and Human Rights Abuses at the US-Mexico Border


    Uphold the Economic, Social, Political, and Cultural Rights of Immigrants, Refugees, Asylum-Seekers, and Trafficked Persons

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