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Thread: How Is Your Racial Barometer Working With Immigration?

  1. #1
    How is your racial barometer working with immigration?

    Most Utahns are not racists. However, commentaries from community members in The Spectrum & Daily News indicate that racism and bigotry are still a problem. As a racial tolerance barometer, let me tell you our story.

    My children are descendents of illegal immigrants.

    Many years ago, coming from a foreign land, our family attempted to enter the United States. Family members were turned away at the border for unclear reasons. Nevertheless, owing to their economic hardships, our family knew that returning to their homeland would be more impoverishing than the risks of living in the U.S. illegally. Consequently, they avoided the proper channels but managed to find employment as "illegals."

    After years of saving money, our family moved into the Midwest, miles away from the U.S. border where they would be, hopefully, insulated from any immigration investigation.
    From which country or ethnic origin did our family come?

    Stereotyping is where individuals base assumptions of a race of people on conventional, formulaic and oversimplified observations, often assuming that members of a particular race will look or act the same way. Racism and racial bigotry are, essentially, severe pejorative forms of stereotyping.

    From stereotyping comes some of the most ignorant and painful admissions of one's character. For example, many times people are anxious to tell me off-color jokes about Mexicans, yet cannot understand why I don't laugh. Often, I will declare, "I am of Mexican heritage," with a typical reply being, "But you don't look like one of them." Further, at my place of employment, I dress professionally and I am typically attended with respect by the public. In contrast, I have noticed that after having worked in the yard where my skin turns a dark bronze after a long summer's exposure to the sun, many times I am treated with indifference by cashiers in stores - until I demonstrate that I speak English.

    The issues of illegal immigration in this country are controversial and quite emotional. Still, it is unwarranted to witness people attacking the immigrants instead of the issues, vilifying their language, customs and their integrity. Evidence of this can be seen by a recent Writers Group column in this newspaper that exposed a writer's xenophobia and thinly disguised bigotry, comparing the influx of Hispanics into this country to the slow cooking of frogs.

    I support the legal entry of all immigrants. However, the use of disparaging insults to attack these people embarrassingly exposes attitudes of racism and bigotry while ignoring the dishonest employers who entice workers merely attempting to support their families.

    Did you guess Mexico or Latin America as our family's country of origin? Did my surname influence you? If you did, that is stereotyping. The correct answer to my question is: Ireland. The Great Potato Famine of the 19th Century was the cause of my wife's family, surname of Barr, illegally migrating to Canada, then to Ohio, several generations ago.

    America is a country of immigrants.

    Can you separate racism from disappointment over weakly-enforced immigration laws?

    Glenn Mesa is a resident of St. George. He is a member of The Spectrum & Daily News Writers Group.

  2. #2
    How is your racial barometer working with immigration?

    Most Utahns are not racists. However, commentaries from community members in The Spectrum & Daily News indicate that racism and bigotry are still a problem. As a racial tolerance barometer, let me tell you our story.

    My children are descendents of illegal immigrants.

    Many years ago, coming from a foreign land, our family attempted to enter the United States. Family members were turned away at the border for unclear reasons. Nevertheless, owing to their economic hardships, our family knew that returning to their homeland would be more impoverishing than the risks of living in the U.S. illegally. Consequently, they avoided the proper channels but managed to find employment as "illegals."

    After years of saving money, our family moved into the Midwest, miles away from the U.S. border where they would be, hopefully, insulated from any immigration investigation.
    From which country or ethnic origin did our family come?

    Stereotyping is where individuals base assumptions of a race of people on conventional, formulaic and oversimplified observations, often assuming that members of a particular race will look or act the same way. Racism and racial bigotry are, essentially, severe pejorative forms of stereotyping.

    From stereotyping comes some of the most ignorant and painful admissions of one's character. For example, many times people are anxious to tell me off-color jokes about Mexicans, yet cannot understand why I don't laugh. Often, I will declare, "I am of Mexican heritage," with a typical reply being, "But you don't look like one of them." Further, at my place of employment, I dress professionally and I am typically attended with respect by the public. In contrast, I have noticed that after having worked in the yard where my skin turns a dark bronze after a long summer's exposure to the sun, many times I am treated with indifference by cashiers in stores - until I demonstrate that I speak English.

    The issues of illegal immigration in this country are controversial and quite emotional. Still, it is unwarranted to witness people attacking the immigrants instead of the issues, vilifying their language, customs and their integrity. Evidence of this can be seen by a recent Writers Group column in this newspaper that exposed a writer's xenophobia and thinly disguised bigotry, comparing the influx of Hispanics into this country to the slow cooking of frogs.

    I support the legal entry of all immigrants. However, the use of disparaging insults to attack these people embarrassingly exposes attitudes of racism and bigotry while ignoring the dishonest employers who entice workers merely attempting to support their families.

    Did you guess Mexico or Latin America as our family's country of origin? Did my surname influence you? If you did, that is stereotyping. The correct answer to my question is: Ireland. The Great Potato Famine of the 19th Century was the cause of my wife's family, surname of Barr, illegally migrating to Canada, then to Ohio, several generations ago.

    America is a country of immigrants.

    Can you separate racism from disappointment over weakly-enforced immigration laws?

    Glenn Mesa is a resident of St. George. He is a member of The Spectrum & Daily News Writers Group.

  3. #3

  4. #4
    Thanks for posting this great article

  5. #5

  6. #6
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">America is a country of immigrants. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Um .. not. America is a nation of Americans, many of immigrant descent. Mental and emotional state coupled with lack of/refusal to assimilate is what perpetuates the "nation of immigrants" lingo.

    There is no such thing as a hypenated American. You are either born and bred American or you are a legalized American of foreign descent. Any foreigner who came here illegally and eventually became legal, yet still considers themselves a hypenated American is here solely in the interest of reaping the benefits of America, an undeserving of citizenship.
    Wolves Travel In Packs
    ____________________

  7. #7
    I think YOU are refusing to assimilate! You'd better start learning Spanish ASAP!. The older you get, the harder it will be for you to learn it. Besides, you shouldn't forget your mental handicap, so start NOW, TODAY!!!

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Proud USC,good article!!
    "Until the color of a man's skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes everywhere will be war"...................BOB MARLEY

  10. #10
    Glad you enjoyed it, Caribbeanman!

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