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Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Necessity and law: Getting over 'illegality'

  1. #1
    Necessity and law: Getting over 'illegality'

    January 8, 2008 at 09:44:45

    by Emile Schepers (Posted by Terrie Albano) Page 1 of 1 page(s)

    http://www.opednews.com

    The anti-immigrant movement sets great store by "legality." "What part of illegal' don't you understand?" is one of their favorite taunts.

    But we know that it is very easy for any government to create new "illegals"; all it has to do is pass some law forbidding people from doing something that they have been doing out of necessity, maybe for centuries.

    In medieval England, it was illegal for hungry peasants to hunt the king's deer. Deer are deer and hunger is hunger, but add this little law and you have the right to hang half the peasantry.

    In Spain in the 1500s, it was illegal to be a Jew or a Muslim.

    In the USA in the 19th century, it was illegal to teach slaves' children to read. Until Rosa Parks made her stand, in many parts of the United States it was illegal for Black people to sit in the front of the bus, or to use the "whites only" washroom.

    In South Africa, until the fall of apartheid, it was illegal for African people to move about without a special government pass, to live in "whites only" neighborhoods, or to swim in the vast Indian Ocean at Durban except at special "Natives only" beaches. It had been illegal for them to drink wine or brandy also, until international boycotts began to harm the South African wine and brandy industry, at which point it conveniently became legal again.

    All of the above "illegalities" (except the one about the royal deer) have been swept away by history, and not only has the sky not fallen, the world is far better for their disappearance. But at the time, many people might have yelled at people who violated these laws (Frederick Douglass surreptitiously teaching himself to read, for example): "What part of illegal' don't you understand?"

    So let's not stand in awe of some little law that some mediocre politicians, out of opportunism, malice, lack of imagination or sheer boredom, choose to pass. Laws, and thus the distinction between "legal" and "illegal," are political products. Laws passed by the U.S. Congress reflect the political struggles of the moment, and often have as much, or more, to do with posturing for various audiences as with protecting the public interest.

    Most often, they are passed to protect the interests of those with the most money and the most power. Such laws sail through the legislative process effortlessly. Laws are passed to protect the rest of us only when we organize and demand them, and then they are usually weak and inadequate (like our labor laws).

    Necessity drives poor farmers and workers from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean to cross our borders and land on our shores. They may bring their families with them, or come with the plan of earning money and sending it back home. They cannot get permanent resident visas because the laws of this country do not allow poor farmers and workers without higher education and without prosperous U.S. citizen relatives to get such visas. But, as a wise Englishman once said, "Necessity knows no law."

    The necessity that makes these poor farmers and workers do this is also the product of laws passed by political mediocrities at home and abroad. These laws have set up international trade rules to favor the rich and powerful.

    If you are a peasant, you still can't poach the royal deer, but if you are a billion-dollar U.S.-based agribusiness, you can dump your corn across the Mexican border well below the price it cost to produce it, and then make the U.S. taxpayers subsidize you not only to make up the difference but also to give you a handsome profit. This outrageous state of affairs ruins the Mexican farmer and robs the U.S. taxpayer, but there is nothing "illegal" about it.

    So when a Mexican or Salvadoran or Guatemalan peasant chooses to flout our immigration laws " unilaterally-imposed laws of a foreign power which has never given his or her own country room to breathe " by crossing our border without a visa, let's not be intimidated by those who shout, "What part of illegal' don't you understand?" Instead let's yell back, "What is it about basic fairness you don't understand?"

  2. #2
    Necessity and law: Getting over 'illegality'

    January 8, 2008 at 09:44:45

    by Emile Schepers (Posted by Terrie Albano) Page 1 of 1 page(s)

    http://www.opednews.com

    The anti-immigrant movement sets great store by "legality." "What part of illegal' don't you understand?" is one of their favorite taunts.

    But we know that it is very easy for any government to create new "illegals"; all it has to do is pass some law forbidding people from doing something that they have been doing out of necessity, maybe for centuries.

    In medieval England, it was illegal for hungry peasants to hunt the king's deer. Deer are deer and hunger is hunger, but add this little law and you have the right to hang half the peasantry.

    In Spain in the 1500s, it was illegal to be a Jew or a Muslim.

    In the USA in the 19th century, it was illegal to teach slaves' children to read. Until Rosa Parks made her stand, in many parts of the United States it was illegal for Black people to sit in the front of the bus, or to use the "whites only" washroom.

    In South Africa, until the fall of apartheid, it was illegal for African people to move about without a special government pass, to live in "whites only" neighborhoods, or to swim in the vast Indian Ocean at Durban except at special "Natives only" beaches. It had been illegal for them to drink wine or brandy also, until international boycotts began to harm the South African wine and brandy industry, at which point it conveniently became legal again.

    All of the above "illegalities" (except the one about the royal deer) have been swept away by history, and not only has the sky not fallen, the world is far better for their disappearance. But at the time, many people might have yelled at people who violated these laws (Frederick Douglass surreptitiously teaching himself to read, for example): "What part of illegal' don't you understand?"

    So let's not stand in awe of some little law that some mediocre politicians, out of opportunism, malice, lack of imagination or sheer boredom, choose to pass. Laws, and thus the distinction between "legal" and "illegal," are political products. Laws passed by the U.S. Congress reflect the political struggles of the moment, and often have as much, or more, to do with posturing for various audiences as with protecting the public interest.

    Most often, they are passed to protect the interests of those with the most money and the most power. Such laws sail through the legislative process effortlessly. Laws are passed to protect the rest of us only when we organize and demand them, and then they are usually weak and inadequate (like our labor laws).

    Necessity drives poor farmers and workers from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean to cross our borders and land on our shores. They may bring their families with them, or come with the plan of earning money and sending it back home. They cannot get permanent resident visas because the laws of this country do not allow poor farmers and workers without higher education and without prosperous U.S. citizen relatives to get such visas. But, as a wise Englishman once said, "Necessity knows no law."

    The necessity that makes these poor farmers and workers do this is also the product of laws passed by political mediocrities at home and abroad. These laws have set up international trade rules to favor the rich and powerful.

    If you are a peasant, you still can't poach the royal deer, but if you are a billion-dollar U.S.-based agribusiness, you can dump your corn across the Mexican border well below the price it cost to produce it, and then make the U.S. taxpayers subsidize you not only to make up the difference but also to give you a handsome profit. This outrageous state of affairs ruins the Mexican farmer and robs the U.S. taxpayer, but there is nothing "illegal" about it.

    So when a Mexican or Salvadoran or Guatemalan peasant chooses to flout our immigration laws " unilaterally-imposed laws of a foreign power which has never given his or her own country room to breathe " by crossing our border without a visa, let's not be intimidated by those who shout, "What part of illegal' don't you understand?" Instead let's yell back, "What is it about basic fairness you don't understand?"

  3. #3
    The average American taxpayers are being punished and forced pay for the destruction attributed to the massive rates of illegal immigration. Additionally they are forced to live amongst the illegal alien population. All you have to do is surf the web to find stories about hundreds of thousands of American citizens being victimized by illegal aliens and their culturally embedded destructive lifestyles and habits. Drunk driving deaths, overcrowded living conditions, multiple cars parked in the grass, blaring mariachi music, drug infestation, graffiti everywhere, overcrowded classrooms, hospitals closing . . .the list is endless.

    Those who benefit and profit from the infestation of illegal immigration are the only ones reaping the rewards as they are far removed from the living conditions and cultural clashes that have resulted from this invasion.
    Wolves Travel In Packs
    ____________________

  4. #4
    Someone12
    Guest
    With all this talk about 'fairness', no one mentions the negative impact on American citizens that illegal immigration has...aside from the lawbreaking ...wages get depressed in many industries (construction, food processing, likely the hotel/motel industry, landscaping, just to name a few)is this FAIR to American workers??...even worse, the brats of illegal aliens fill our schools to overflowing in many parts of the US...now I ask you, is this FAIR to American kids?
    Illegal aliens cause numerous car wrecks each year and walk away from the accidents without paying a penny, thus costing American drivers more for insurance and/or repairs....is this FAIR to American drivers?
    Illegal aliens have thousands of USC brats each year in American hospitals, yet only about 1 in 100,000 might pay for the medical costs and care, once again stiffing the American taxpayer, reducing available service and raising insurance premiums for American workers and businesses...is this FAIR?
    Lastly (but not conclusively) illegal aliens bring disease to our cities and schools; there has been a resurgence in leprosy, TB and other one-of-a-kind communicable diseases....is this FAIR to you or me or our children?
    So when illegals and their supporters talk about 'fairness' -- well, let's hear from them about how 'fair' all of the above are...and moreover, how many Americans would GLADLY accept these disadvantages?
    One last question: Where does it state in our laws, Constitution or anywhere else on this planet that AMerican citizens have the responsibility of providing jobs, education and free health care to the entire world? Is that FAIR?

  5. #5
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Someone12:
    With all this talk about 'fairness', no one mentions the negative impact on American citizens that illegal immigration has...aside from the lawbreaking ...wages get depressed in many industries (construction, food processing, likely the hotel/motel industry, landscaping, just to name a few)is this FAIR to American workers??...even worse, the brats of illegal aliens fill our schools to overflowing in many parts of the US...now I ask you, is this FAIR to American kids?
    Illegal aliens cause numerous car wrecks each year and walk away from the accidents without paying a penny, thus costing American drivers more for insurance and/or repairs....is this FAIR to American drivers?
    Illegal aliens have thousands of USC brats each year in American hospitals, yet only about 1 in 100,000 might pay for the medical costs and care, once again stiffing the American taxpayer, reducing available service and raising insurance premiums for American workers and businesses...is this FAIR?
    Lastly (but not conclusively) illegal aliens bring disease to our cities and schools; there has been a resurgence in leprosy, TB and other one-of-a-kind communicable diseases....is this FAIR to you or me or our children?
    So when illegals and their supporters talk about 'fairness' -- well, let's hear from them about how 'fair' all of the above are...and moreover, how many Americans would GLADLY accept these disadvantages?
    One last question: Where does it state in our laws, Constition or anywhere else on this planet that AMerican citizens have the responsibility of providing jobs, education and free health care to the entire world? Is that FAIR? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Only in America.

    More Americans killed by illegal aliens than Iraq war, study says
    Jim Brown
    OneNewsNow.com
    February 22, 2007


    Illegal aliens are killing more Americans than the Iraq war, says a new report from Family Security Matters that estimates some 2,158 murders are committed every year by illegal aliens in the U.S. The group says that number is more than 15 percent of all the murders reported by the Federal Bureau of Investigation in the U.S. and about three times the representation of illegal aliens in the general population.

    Hear this Report
    advertisement



    Mike Cutler, a former senior special agent with the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (the former INS), is a fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies and an advisor to Family Security Matters (FSM). He says the high number of Americans being killed by illegal aliens is just part of the collateral damage that comes with tolerating illegal immigration.


    "The military actually called for the BORTAC team, ... the elite unit of the Border Patrol, to be detailed to Iraq to help to secure the Iraqi border," Cutler notes. "Now, if our military can understand that Iraq's security depends in measure on the ability to protect its border against insurgents and terrorists, then why isn't our country similarly protecting our own borders?" he asks.

    "We are now five and a half years, nearly, after 9/11, and yet our borders remain open," the Center for Immigration Studies fellow observes. "We have National Guardsmen assigned on the border, but it turns out they are unarmed," he points out. "Their rules of engagement are very simple: if armed intruders head your way, run in the other direction."

    This situation would "almost be comical if it wasn't so tragic," Cutler asserts. "If our borders are wide open, this means that drugs, criminals, and terrorists are entering our country just as easily as the dishwashers," he says.

    The report from FSM estimates that the 267,000 illegal aliens currently incarcerated in the nation are responsible for nearly 1,300,000 crimes, ranging from drug arrests to rape and murder. Such statistics, Cutler contends, debunk the claim that illegal immigration is a victimless crime. "Then we even have another problem," he adds, "and that's the Visa Waiver Program."

    The federal government's Visa Waiver Program enables nationals of certain countries to travel to the United States for tourism or business for stays of 90 days or less without obtaining a visa. According to the U.S. State Department website, the waiver program was established in 1986 with the objective of "eliminating unnecessary barriers to travel," stimulating America's tourism industry, and allowing the government to focus consular resources in other areas.

    Cutler says the U.S. retains the Visa Waiver Program because the nation's travel, tourism, and hospitality industries want America's borders wide open. In other words, the former INS official contends, the nation's security is being compromised in the name of trade.
    Wolves Travel In Packs
    ____________________

  6. #6
    TheBostonChannel.com

    Father Faces Deportation After Making Headlines
    Man's Baby Was State's First Of 2008

    POSTED: 10:39 am EST January 7, 2008
    UPDATED: 10:50 am EST January 7, 2008


    PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- The father of Rhode Island's first baby of 2008 faces deportation after being arrested for violating immigration laws, while his roommate, also an illegal immigrant, was found dead of a suspected suicide hours after the arrest.

    Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agents arrested Mynor Montufar at his apartment Friday after local newspapers and television stations showed him and Carmen Marrero as parents of the first baby born in the state after the new year rolled in, officials said.


    ICE spokeswoman Paula Grenier said the timing of Montufar's arrest was coincidental to the publicity surrounding his child. Another man also was arrested at the apartment, although Grenier would not identify him, citing agency policy.

    Another illegal immigrant who shared the couple's apartment, David De La Roca, 25, was found dead in a suspected suicide shortly after Montufar was taken into custody. He was found hanging from a belt in a locked bedroom, according to a police report.

    When searching the apartment, ICE agents did not enter the locked bedroom where De La Roca was later found dead, Grenier said. It was not immediately clear when he died, but officials at the state medical examiner's office said they were planning an autopsy.


    The president of the Mexican-American Association of Rhode Island, Antonio Barajas, said an investigation would show whether the death was a result of distress triggered by fear of deportation.

    "There are two tragedies," Barajas said. "Hopefully an investigation will be conducted to determine whether they are related or not."

    Copyright 2008 by The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

    http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news...49/detail.html
    _________________
    Wolves Travel In Packs
    ____________________

  7. #7
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by davdah:
    C'mon ProudUSC, this was a cheap shot. Our country is far more sophisticated than this. The laws we have are far more 'fair' and tolerant than yesteryear. We don't hang anyone for hunting or make anyone sit in the back. I take that back. Actually we do. We make the people who follow the rules sit in the back of the immigration bus. The ones who hijacked it are all piled in within the first couple rows. Assuming through arrogance of location they will get theirs first. Does it make sense that perhaps we should right that wrong? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    No cheap shot intended. I thought the article was interesting, that's all. Remember, we are all allowed to post just about anything we want to here, right? We can even applaud the accidental demises of illegal immigrants or anyone else for that matter. So, I think anything is fair game (except those darn four-letter words).

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