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Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Serious Questions To Ponder

  1. #1
    Questions to Ponder:


    How were the Black Codes similar to and/or different from the Jim Crow laws that emerged after 1890?
    What was different about the terror wrought by the Ku Klux Klan and the terror of lynching that began in the 1880? How were the two forms of terror part of the same continuation of white supremacy stemming from the days of slavery?
    Why do you think black men gained the right to vote during Reconstruction but did not gain the right to the land they had worked as slaves and which was owned by whites who had revolted against the United States during the Civil War?
    Why do you think that the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments excluded black women from suffrage? Do you think that the history of Reconstruction and Jim Crow might have been different had white and black women obtained suffrage immediately after the Civil War?
    Some historians claim that the vicious lynching of African Americans that began in the 1880s with stepped up frequency was different from anything in the past because of its mob, public spectacle. What does this mean? Was lynching like a circus? How is this explained?
    Do you see a relationship between years of depicting African Americans as inferior people in the popular media, such a minstrel shows, and the ease with which blacks were lynched and deprived of their civil rights? How do you think this worked? Do you see any similarities to depicting people as inferior and the use of violence against them in other periods of American history?
    What was new about how black men were deprived of their right to vote after 1890 and the way they were deprived of their vote prior to 1890? Why was the new form of disfranchisement more acceptable and more easy to enforce compared to the older forms used against blacks prior to 1890?
    Why do you think it mattered to white people that the races were separated legally rather than by custom after 1890? What can you imagine the motivation to have been on the part of white people to want to formally establish a "color line?"
    What do you think the federal government might have done to stop the creation of a Jim Crow society in the South? Would anything have worked? Why did the federal government essentially stop trying to protect the civil rights of southern blacks after the Compromise of 1877?
    Do you think that you could have lived as a black person in the Jim Crow South? How would you have coped? What would you have done to survive? What would have been the most difficult thing for you as a young black person to have accepted or coped with in Mississippi or Georgia at the peak of Jim Crow terrorism? Answer the same questions from the perspective of a young white person.


    Finally, do you see similarities between modern anti-Latino/Immigrant hysteria and 'mob lynching' of XIX century?



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Selected Bibliography
    Ayers, Edward L. The Promise of the New South: Life After Reconstruction. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992

    Brundage, W. Fitzhugh, ed. Under Sentence of Death: Lynching in the South. Chapel Hill, N. C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.

    Cohen, William. At Freedom's Edge: Black Mobility and the Southern White Quest for Racial Control, 1861-1915. Baton Rouge, La.: Louisiana State University Press, 1991.

    Du Bois, W.E.B. The Autobiography of W.E.B. Du Bois: A Soliloquy on Viewing My Life from the Last Decade of Its First Century. New York: International Publishers, 1968.

    ______Black Reconstruction. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1935.

    ______Darkwater: Voices from Within the Veil. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1920.

    ______Dusk of Dawn: An Essay Toward an Autobiography of a Race Concept. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1940.

    ______The Souls of Black Folk: Essays and Sketches. Chicago: 1903; reprint, New York: Signet, 1982.

    Hale, Grace Elizabeth. Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South, 1890-1940. New York: Pantheon Books, 1998.

    Harlan, Louis. Booker T. Washington: The Making of a Black Leader, 1856-1901. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979.

    ______Booker T. Washington: The Wizard of Tuskegee, 1901-1915. New York: Oxford University Press, 1983.

    Lewis, David Levering. W.E.B. Du Bois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919. New York: Henry Holt, 1993.

    Litwack, Leon. Trouble in Mind: Black Southerners in the Age of Jim Crow. New York: Knopf, 1998.

    McPherson, James M. The Abolitionist Legacy: From Reconstruction to the NAACP. Princeton, N. J.: Princeton University Press, 1975.

    Perlaman, Michael. Struggle for Mastery: Disfranchisement in the South, 1888-1908. Chapel Hill, N. C.: University of North Carolina Press, 2001.

    Toll, Robert C. Blacking Up: The Minstrel Show in Nineteenth-Century America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1974.

    Tolnay, Stewart E. A Festival of Violence: An Analysis of Southern Lynchings, 1882-1930. Urbana and Chicago, Ill.: University of Illinois Press, 1995.

    Trelease, Allen W. White Terror: The Ku Klux Klan Conspiracy and Southern Reconstruction. Baton Rouge, La.: Louisiana State University Press, 1971.

    Washington, Booker T. Up from Slavery: An Autobiography. New York: Doubleday, Page & Co., 1901.

    Williamson, Joel. The Crucible of Race: Black-White Relations in the American South Since Emancipation. New York: Oxford University Press, 1984.

    ______A Rage for Order: Black-White Relations in the American South Since Emancipation. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.

    Woodward, C. Vann. Origins of the New South, 1877-1913. 3rd. rev. ed. Baton Rouge La.: Louisiana State University Press, 1997.

    ______The Strange Career of Jim Crow. 3rd rev.ed. New York: Oxford University University Press, 1974.

    View this page as a printable Adobe PDF file.

    Next: Surviving Jim Crow >>

  2. #2
    Questions to Ponder:


    How were the Black Codes similar to and/or different from the Jim Crow laws that emerged after 1890?
    What was different about the terror wrought by the Ku Klux Klan and the terror of lynching that began in the 1880? How were the two forms of terror part of the same continuation of white supremacy stemming from the days of slavery?
    Why do you think black men gained the right to vote during Reconstruction but did not gain the right to the land they had worked as slaves and which was owned by whites who had revolted against the United States during the Civil War?
    Why do you think that the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments excluded black women from suffrage? Do you think that the history of Reconstruction and Jim Crow might have been different had white and black women obtained suffrage immediately after the Civil War?
    Some historians claim that the vicious lynching of African Americans that began in the 1880s with stepped up frequency was different from anything in the past because of its mob, public spectacle. What does this mean? Was lynching like a circus? How is this explained?
    Do you see a relationship between years of depicting African Americans as inferior people in the popular media, such a minstrel shows, and the ease with which blacks were lynched and deprived of their civil rights? How do you think this worked? Do you see any similarities to depicting people as inferior and the use of violence against them in other periods of American history?
    What was new about how black men were deprived of their right to vote after 1890 and the way they were deprived of their vote prior to 1890? Why was the new form of disfranchisement more acceptable and more easy to enforce compared to the older forms used against blacks prior to 1890?
    Why do you think it mattered to white people that the races were separated legally rather than by custom after 1890? What can you imagine the motivation to have been on the part of white people to want to formally establish a "color line?"
    What do you think the federal government might have done to stop the creation of a Jim Crow society in the South? Would anything have worked? Why did the federal government essentially stop trying to protect the civil rights of southern blacks after the Compromise of 1877?
    Do you think that you could have lived as a black person in the Jim Crow South? How would you have coped? What would you have done to survive? What would have been the most difficult thing for you as a young black person to have accepted or coped with in Mississippi or Georgia at the peak of Jim Crow terrorism? Answer the same questions from the perspective of a young white person.


    Finally, do you see similarities between modern anti-Latino/Immigrant hysteria and 'mob lynching' of XIX century?



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Selected Bibliography
    Ayers, Edward L. The Promise of the New South: Life After Reconstruction. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992

    Brundage, W. Fitzhugh, ed. Under Sentence of Death: Lynching in the South. Chapel Hill, N. C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.

    Cohen, William. At Freedom's Edge: Black Mobility and the Southern White Quest for Racial Control, 1861-1915. Baton Rouge, La.: Louisiana State University Press, 1991.

    Du Bois, W.E.B. The Autobiography of W.E.B. Du Bois: A Soliloquy on Viewing My Life from the Last Decade of Its First Century. New York: International Publishers, 1968.

    ______Black Reconstruction. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1935.

    ______Darkwater: Voices from Within the Veil. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1920.

    ______Dusk of Dawn: An Essay Toward an Autobiography of a Race Concept. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1940.

    ______The Souls of Black Folk: Essays and Sketches. Chicago: 1903; reprint, New York: Signet, 1982.

    Hale, Grace Elizabeth. Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South, 1890-1940. New York: Pantheon Books, 1998.

    Harlan, Louis. Booker T. Washington: The Making of a Black Leader, 1856-1901. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979.

    ______Booker T. Washington: The Wizard of Tuskegee, 1901-1915. New York: Oxford University Press, 1983.

    Lewis, David Levering. W.E.B. Du Bois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919. New York: Henry Holt, 1993.

    Litwack, Leon. Trouble in Mind: Black Southerners in the Age of Jim Crow. New York: Knopf, 1998.

    McPherson, James M. The Abolitionist Legacy: From Reconstruction to the NAACP. Princeton, N. J.: Princeton University Press, 1975.

    Perlaman, Michael. Struggle for Mastery: Disfranchisement in the South, 1888-1908. Chapel Hill, N. C.: University of North Carolina Press, 2001.

    Toll, Robert C. Blacking Up: The Minstrel Show in Nineteenth-Century America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1974.

    Tolnay, Stewart E. A Festival of Violence: An Analysis of Southern Lynchings, 1882-1930. Urbana and Chicago, Ill.: University of Illinois Press, 1995.

    Trelease, Allen W. White Terror: The Ku Klux Klan Conspiracy and Southern Reconstruction. Baton Rouge, La.: Louisiana State University Press, 1971.

    Washington, Booker T. Up from Slavery: An Autobiography. New York: Doubleday, Page & Co., 1901.

    Williamson, Joel. The Crucible of Race: Black-White Relations in the American South Since Emancipation. New York: Oxford University Press, 1984.

    ______A Rage for Order: Black-White Relations in the American South Since Emancipation. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.

    Woodward, C. Vann. Origins of the New South, 1877-1913. 3rd. rev. ed. Baton Rouge La.: Louisiana State University Press, 1997.

    ______The Strange Career of Jim Crow. 3rd rev.ed. New York: Oxford University University Press, 1974.

    View this page as a printable Adobe PDF file.

    Next: Surviving Jim Crow >>

  3. #3
    ---->Humming the theme from "Twilight Zone"<---

  4. #4
    Whatever you say, but you can't beat FACTS and HISTORY

  5. #5
    What are you talking about? Do you actually think people READ the LONG, BORING things you cut-n-paste in here? You need help.

  6. #6
    atwitsend, are you so cowardly that you have to use 'epicb@stard' ID to assault me here?
    Man or a woman or whoever/whatever you are, you must be really sick to come up with bunch of alternate ID's to create an impression that the 'mob is against' me.
    Pathetic you are, now I can see why you say you do what you say you do after reading my posts.

    atwitsend = epicb@stard = marmaduk = emica = unlawful carnal knowledge and etc.

  7. #7
    The OP has raised very important question of race relationships and intolerance.

    I think we should all learn from our past.

  8. #8
    The OP has raised very important question of race relationships and intolerance.

    I think we should all learn from our past.

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