ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: "STUDIES" ON THE "COSTS" OF IMMIGRATION

  1. #1
    Studies by immigration critics claim that the U.S. is admitting too many poor and uneducated immigrants who then drain government welfare systems. But a more thoughtful look at these critical studies and at the U.S. immigrant population proves them wrong. Immigrants in fact are responsible for a smaller portion of government costs than critics claim. On the other side of the ledger, they contribute more in tax payments and to overall economic growth than critics have acknowledged. For more information, see IPC's most recent Fact Check titled The Economic Impact of Immigration.



    TAXES AND ECONOMIC GROWTH. Immigration critics not only are wrong to claim that immigrants use disproportionately high levels of government services and increase the poverty rate (see below), they also misstate the positive contributions immigrants make as taxpayers and to U.S. economic growth. Immigration increases the U.S. Gross Domestic Product by approximately $37 billion each year. And national and state studies find that immigrants pay more in taxes than they use in government services. As for undocumented immigrants, it is a myth that they do not pay taxes. Up to 75% of them pay federal and state income and payroll taxes and all immigrants (legal and undocumented) pay sales taxes and property taxes.



    POVERTY RATE. Critics of immigration argue that "immigrant households" are more likely to live in poverty than are non-immigrant households. Current U.S. Census data show that the number of people living in poverty grew by 3.9 million between 2000 and 2006. But the same data also show that while the poverty rate for U.S.-born citizens increased slightly, it fell slightly for immigrants. And, as immigrants integrate into U.S. society, they work their way out of poverty. For example, the children and grandchildren of Hispanic immigrants have made great strides in closing the economic gap with native-born whites by getting an education, getting better jobs, and earning higher incomes than their parents and grandparents. As a case study, homeownership reflects the economic advancement of the immigrant population, and, in California, the homeownership rates for Latino immigrants rose from 16.4 percent among those who arrived in the U.S. in the last 10 years to 64.6 percent among those who have lived here for 30 years or more.



    WELFARE COSTS. Some immigration critics exaggerate immigrants' welfare use by measuring the welfare costs of "immigrant households." These studies include welfare benefits paid to U.S.-citizen children as "immigrant welfare costs" if any member of the child's household is an immigrant. But, in fact, most legal immigrants are not eligible for publicly financed benefits and undocumented immigrants are not eligible for any public benefits. In addition, the participation rates of non-citizens in some federal benefits programs have been declining.



    HEALTH CARE COSTS. Immigration critics also fault immigration for the increase in U.S. health care costs. In fact, per capita health care expenditures were 55 percent lower for immigrants than for natives in 1998. On average, immigrants received about $1,139 in health care, compared with $2,546 for native-born residents. Although all immigrants are eligible for emergency medical services, they had lower expenditures for emergency room visits, doctor's office visits, outpatient hospital visits, inpatient hospital visits, and prescription drugs.

    Source 1
    Source 2

    Source 3
    "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

  2. #2
    Studies by immigration critics claim that the U.S. is admitting too many poor and uneducated immigrants who then drain government welfare systems. But a more thoughtful look at these critical studies and at the U.S. immigrant population proves them wrong. Immigrants in fact are responsible for a smaller portion of government costs than critics claim. On the other side of the ledger, they contribute more in tax payments and to overall economic growth than critics have acknowledged. For more information, see IPC's most recent Fact Check titled The Economic Impact of Immigration.



    TAXES AND ECONOMIC GROWTH. Immigration critics not only are wrong to claim that immigrants use disproportionately high levels of government services and increase the poverty rate (see below), they also misstate the positive contributions immigrants make as taxpayers and to U.S. economic growth. Immigration increases the U.S. Gross Domestic Product by approximately $37 billion each year. And national and state studies find that immigrants pay more in taxes than they use in government services. As for undocumented immigrants, it is a myth that they do not pay taxes. Up to 75% of them pay federal and state income and payroll taxes and all immigrants (legal and undocumented) pay sales taxes and property taxes.



    POVERTY RATE. Critics of immigration argue that "immigrant households" are more likely to live in poverty than are non-immigrant households. Current U.S. Census data show that the number of people living in poverty grew by 3.9 million between 2000 and 2006. But the same data also show that while the poverty rate for U.S.-born citizens increased slightly, it fell slightly for immigrants. And, as immigrants integrate into U.S. society, they work their way out of poverty. For example, the children and grandchildren of Hispanic immigrants have made great strides in closing the economic gap with native-born whites by getting an education, getting better jobs, and earning higher incomes than their parents and grandparents. As a case study, homeownership reflects the economic advancement of the immigrant population, and, in California, the homeownership rates for Latino immigrants rose from 16.4 percent among those who arrived in the U.S. in the last 10 years to 64.6 percent among those who have lived here for 30 years or more.



    WELFARE COSTS. Some immigration critics exaggerate immigrants' welfare use by measuring the welfare costs of "immigrant households." These studies include welfare benefits paid to U.S.-citizen children as "immigrant welfare costs" if any member of the child's household is an immigrant. But, in fact, most legal immigrants are not eligible for publicly financed benefits and undocumented immigrants are not eligible for any public benefits. In addition, the participation rates of non-citizens in some federal benefits programs have been declining.



    HEALTH CARE COSTS. Immigration critics also fault immigration for the increase in U.S. health care costs. In fact, per capita health care expenditures were 55 percent lower for immigrants than for natives in 1998. On average, immigrants received about $1,139 in health care, compared with $2,546 for native-born residents. Although all immigrants are eligible for emergency medical services, they had lower expenditures for emergency room visits, doctor's office visits, outpatient hospital visits, inpatient hospital visits, and prescription drugs.

    Source 1
    Source 2

    Source 3
    "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

  3. #3
    Interesting article, Hudson. I read something similar the other day. Thanks for sharing.

  4. #4
    Immigrant Population Hits Record 38 Million

    Wednesday, November 28, 2007 10:38 PM
    By: Chris Gonsalves


    A new study by the Center for Immigration Studies, based on the latest Census Bureau data, shows the number of immigrants in America, both legal and illegal, has swelled to a record 38 million this year making one of every eight U.S. residents an immigrant.

    The new numbers indicate the highest level in more than eight decades with a third of those being illegal aliens.

    One third of immigrants are on some form of welfare, costing states nearly $20 billion a year, the study claimed, adding that efforts to legalize the spiraling number of illegal aliens will only increase the amount of uneducated, uninsured legal immigrants burdening America's welfare rolls.

    Since 2000, more than 10 million immigrants have entered the U.S., more than half of them illegally, according to the CIS. With no change in U.S. immigration policy, another 15 million immigrants will likely arrive in the next 10 years.

    "The last seven years have been the highest period of immigration in American History," says the report's lead author, Dr. Steven A. Camarota. "The roughly 1.5 million immigrants arriving each year have a very significant effect on American life."

    Mark Krikorian, executive director of the CIS, tells Newsmax that the deleterious effects of continued immigration, include "an increasing burden on taxpayers to subsidize a 19th century workforce imported into a 21st century society; further displacement and wage reductions for the low-skilled and teen-age American workers who are the chief competitors of illegal immigrants; and continued slowing of technological innovation in the fields where immigrants are concentrated due to the artificial flooding of the low-skilled labor market and consequent reduction of incentives for businesses to mechanize and use labor more efficiently."

    The impact is being felt most pointedly in a handful of states. California, Florida, Texas, New Jersey and Arizona are bearing the brunt of immigration increases both legal and illegal, the CIS study found. California's 10 million immigrants alone make up 27 percent of the nation's total immigrant population.

    "Some 75 percent of immigrants settle in ten states," Krikorian tells Newsmax. "But Americans in other states are not immune to the effects of mass immigration. The consequences for security, sovereignty, assimilation, and government spending are national problems. In other words, every state is now a border state, every town a border town."


    A third of all U.S. immigrants come from Mexico, making it the top country of origin followed by China, India, the Philippines and Vietnam. Almost 60 percent of the Illegal aliens entering the U.S. come from Mexico.

    The numbers portend a major shift in American demographics. More than 72 percent of native U.S. residents are white, 13 percent are black, 10 percent are Hispanic and 2 percent are Asian. But among the burgeoning immigrant population, over 48 percent are Hispanic, 23 percent are Asian, 21 percent are white and 7 percent are black.

    Camarota, research director at the CIS, a Washington think tank that favors immigration restrictions along with improved services for legal immigrants, says immigrants now make up one in every five school-age children in America. Immigration accounts for all of the increases in public school enrollment nationwide over the past 20 years, the CIS reports.

    In places such as Los Angeles County and New York City, the children of immigrant fathers make up nearly 60 percent of the school-age population.

    On top of that, a quarter of these immigrant children live in poverty and a third lack health insurance, something Camarota says "creates enormous challenges for the nation's schools, healthcare system and physical infrastructure."

    In fact, the study found that 17 percent of immigrants and their children live below the poverty line with income of less than $20,000 per year for a family of four - some 50 percent higher than the poverty rate for native U.S. residents.

    Many immigrants do ultimately find a better life here. But the study reveals that even those who have been in the U.S. for more than two decades are more likely than native residents to live in poverty, lack health insurance and use the welfare system.

    Camarota points out that the numbers indicate the reason for the high rates of poverty and welfare among immigrants is a lack of education, "not their legal status or unwillingness to work."

    More than 31 percent of adult immigrants have not completed high school, compared to just 8 percent of U.S. natives. Since 2000, immigrants have boosted the overall number of workers who lack a high school diploma to 14 percent.

    Camarota's findings on the quality of life for uneducated immigrants shows that attempts at so-called amnesty for the current population of 12 million illegal aliens would prove costly and provide little benefit.

    "Immigrants who have legal status, but little education, generally have low incomes and make heavy use of welfare programs," the CIS report states. "If we decide to legalize illegal immigrants, we should at least understand that it will not result in dramatically lower welfare use or poverty.

    "Those who advocate such a policy need to acknowledge this problem and not argue that legalization will save taxpayers money or result in a vast improvement in the income of illegal aliens," the report continues. "Legalized illegals will still be overwhelmingly uneducated and this fact has enormous implications for their income, welfare use, health insurance coverage, and the effect on American taxpayers."

    Of the estimated 12 million illegal aliens in the U.S., nearly 7 million have jobs. Illegal immigrants earn an average of $46,000 per household annually compared with $67,000 for native families, the CIS study shows.

    "A central question for immigration policy is whether we should allow in so many people with little education " increasing job competition for the poorest American workers and the population needing government assistance," says Camarota. "Setting aside the lower socio economic status of immigrants, no nation has ever attempted to incorporate nearly 38 million newcomers into its society."

    America has, of course, traditionally been a nation of immigrants. But the CIS report points out that the immigrant population now accounts for a large share of the increase in the overall U.S. population. During the first decade of the last century, the 3.2 million additional immigrants accounted for just 20 percent of the total increase in the U.S. population. The 6.8 million immigrant increase in the last seven years equals 34 percent of U.S. population's rise in that same period.

    "Whatever one thinks of contemporary immigration, it is critically important to understand that its effect on America represents a choice," Camarota says. "Selection criteria can be altered, as can the total number of people allowed into the country legally. With illegal aliens accounting for nearly one in three immigrants, their effect on the nation by themselves is now very large."

    True to the CIS charter, Krikorian stresses that there " is no excuse whatever for intolerant attitudes toward legal immigrants -- we admitted them according to the rules established by our elected representatives, and we must, and will, continue to embrace them as Americans in training.

    "Even illegal immigrants must be treated humanely as they are detained and returned to their homes," Krikorian says. "But future legal immigration is a different question -- mass immigration is simply not compatible with the goals of a modern society and should be minimized to the extent possible."


    Newsmax http://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/Immigrant_Population_/...al&promo_code=3E6F-1

    The CIS(Center for Immigration Studies) actually researches and reports the results, not some slanted OBL point of view like the one above. Hospitals are closing all over the US because of the needs of uninsured illegal aliens who think the ER should substitute for a visit to the doctor.
    Wolves Travel In Packs
    ____________________

  5. #5
    It would be interesting to know how they collect the data regarding illegal aliens.

  6. #6
    They DO HAVE A WEBSITE, you know.
    Wolves Travel In Packs
    ____________________

  7. #7
    Yes, I found it. I also found how "unslanted" they are based on their mission statement:

    Our Mission

    It is the Center's mission to expand the base of public knowledge and understanding of the need for an immigration policy that gives first concern to the broad national interest. The Center is animated by a pro-immigrant, low-immigration vision which seeks fewer immigrants but a warmer welcome for those admitted.

  8. #8
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ProudUSC:
    Yes, I found it. I also found how "unslanted" they are based on their mission statement:

    Our Mission

    It is the Center's mission to expand the base of public knowledge and understanding of the need for an immigration policy that gives first concern to the broad national interest. The Center is animated by a pro-immigrant, low-immigration vision which seeks fewer immigrants but a warmer welcome for those admitted. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    They have a mission statement, not a negate the facts and ignore the reality of their statiscal finding unlike the delusional obviously factually void mess posted above.
    Wolves Travel In Packs
    ____________________

  9. #9
    Hogwash? I wasn't the one who said children born in this country of 2 illegals aren't US citizens!!!!!

  10. #10
    Are you an (illegal) "immigrant"? because your responses and sad attempts to defend the defenseless truly have the identical ring of delusional justification and denial of reality.
    Wolves Travel In Packs
    ____________________

Similar Threads

  1. More Costs Of Illegal Immigration
    By federale86 in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-09-2010, 01:31 PM
  2. immigrating after studies
    By Cori in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-12-2005, 02:55 PM
  3. Case studies-personal experiences
    By Wish in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-31-2003, 02:03 PM
  4. Studies abroad & Greencard
    By in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-06-2003, 02:40 PM
  5. Attorney Costs
    By in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 01-25-2003, 06:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: