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Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: US visa with UK criminal conviction

  1. #1
    I am enquiring after much confusion involving the rules around entering the USA with a criminal conviction.

    I am 20 years old, and received a conviction of theft from my employer last year after I stole some money, and I received 80 hours community service as a sentence.

    I understand that this means I need to apply for a Visa to enter the USA. I have also heard of a 'I-192' form which may also/alternatively be required-what is this?

    I have been given some limited advice, some of which has suggested that if a crime would normally invoke a sentence of a year or less under the Columbia state law, then I can still enter the USA under the visa-waiver programme-is this correct? I just don't know how to find out what sentence would usually be imposed on the crime I committed-all I was ever told was that custody was extremely unlikely, and I received community service, with a number of hours which was comparatively small to other community service sentences.

    If I do apply for a Visa-how likely is it that it would be accepted, if you consider my conviction? And if it is granted, does it last for a set amount of time, or must I re-apply every single time I want to enter the country? I actually only intend to be there one day as a caribbean cruise starts there, which I wanted to experience this summer.

  2. #2
    I am enquiring after much confusion involving the rules around entering the USA with a criminal conviction.

    I am 20 years old, and received a conviction of theft from my employer last year after I stole some money, and I received 80 hours community service as a sentence.

    I understand that this means I need to apply for a Visa to enter the USA. I have also heard of a 'I-192' form which may also/alternatively be required-what is this?

    I have been given some limited advice, some of which has suggested that if a crime would normally invoke a sentence of a year or less under the Columbia state law, then I can still enter the USA under the visa-waiver programme-is this correct? I just don't know how to find out what sentence would usually be imposed on the crime I committed-all I was ever told was that custody was extremely unlikely, and I received community service, with a number of hours which was comparatively small to other community service sentences.

    If I do apply for a Visa-how likely is it that it would be accepted, if you consider my conviction? And if it is granted, does it last for a set amount of time, or must I re-apply every single time I want to enter the country? I actually only intend to be there one day as a caribbean cruise starts there, which I wanted to experience this summer.

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