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Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Baseball and Immigration

  1. #1
    National Foundation for American Policy in a report titled Coming to America: Immigrants, Baseball and the Contributions of Foreign-Born Players to America's Pastime writes "More than 23 percent of major league baseball players on active rosters in 2006 were foreign-born, the highest in baseball history. The percentage of foreign-born players in the major leagues has more than doubled from 10 percent since 1990. As of August 31, 2006, 175 of the 750 players on major league 25-man rosters were foreign born."

  2. #2
    National Foundation for American Policy in a report titled Coming to America: Immigrants, Baseball and the Contributions of Foreign-Born Players to America's Pastime writes "More than 23 percent of major league baseball players on active rosters in 2006 were foreign-born, the highest in baseball history. The percentage of foreign-born players in the major leagues has more than doubled from 10 percent since 1990. As of August 31, 2006, 175 of the 750 players on major league 25-man rosters were foreign born."

  3. #3
    If you read it, bear in mind that the author of this piece has it wrong--the market for baseball players is NOT limited to the major league teams. He totally ignores the farm teams that are feeders for major league ball, and where working conditions and salaries fall far short of what those in the majors make. Major league ball players are the creme de la creme and are paid accordingly, just as the top performers in any profession usually are.

    See also the following:
    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D0CE5DE...33A05756C0A96F958260

    "To this day, teams like the Athletics save money by filling out their minor league rosters with young Dominicans who can be had for a meager wage that a young American would never accept. (Tejada signed for $2,000. The average American signing bonus is $50,000.) It's a throw-back-the-little-ones approach; within a year or two, most of these players have either been shipped back to the Dominican or, if they manage to escape their handlers, are roaming the streets of cities like New York as illegal immigrants."

    The Dominican National Pastime
    By NICHOLAS DAWIDOFF
    Published: May 30, 1999
    Writing about the following book:
    Away Games
    The Life and Times
    of a Latin Baseball Player.
    By Marcos Breton
    and Jose Luis Villegas.
    Illustrated. 272 pp. New York:
    Simon & Schuster. $23.

  4. #4
    Here's another perspective on ballplayers, from another website. Note especially the comment about foreign players getting paid far less:

    The great game of baseball has a different system for player development. Although some promising young players do play college ball after high school, the primary, almost inescapable route to the Majors is through the Minor Leagues. And that system sort of works like the NCAA in reverse:


    The ball players are unimportant.
    Most young ball players start off in a professional draft, so they have no choice where they'll work. Their most likely destinations are points hundreds or thousands of miles away from the comforts of home, usually in small, out-of-the-way towns like Butte, Montana or Pulaski, Tennessee. Most of the Rookie League or low-A towns are located in agricultural areas, where the 'farm team' label is very apt indeed.

    The ball players live in obscurity.
    No one outside a tiny core of scouting geeks knows or cares about Minor Leaguers, mostly because the mainstream media has more than enough material in covering the 750 athletes who've already proved themselves as Major Leaguers.

    Local reporters don't provide important Minors coverage, either, because they know that the players are just passing through on the way up an organizational ladder. By the time a kid's good enough to be newsworthy, he's good enough to be shipped right out of town.

    Most young ball players are broke.
    For the few high-profile bonus babies coming through the MLB draft in any given year, there are dozens of others receiving less than $20,000 as a signing bonus. International players often get far less, sometimes just a few thousand dollars, and once in the system, they gets paid as little as $850 a month in set-in-stone Minor League wages.

    With those kinds of paltry wages, it's no surprise that most Minor Leaguers are, literally, hungry for success. The players are usually strapped for the cash to pay for food, or anything else, for that matter, so most of them rent out spare rooms with local families during the season, sleeping on the flours or couches. Off-seasons are about not-so-glamorous jobs laying tiles, selling insurance, and doing anything else that might pay the bills.

    The ball players aren't pampered.
    When it comes to arrangements living quarters, transportation, banking, and the like, the players have no ready-made system to cater to their every need. Homesick kids, most of them teenagers away from their families for the first time, are on their own when it comes to budgeting, paying rent, and all the other hassles in establishing and/or uprooting multiple residences. No matter how talented or promising, there are no exceptions and no leeway.

    None of the above makes for anything approaching the easy life, but for at least half of all players, Minor League life is far tougher. With nearly 50% of all new millennium Minor Leaguers hailing from Latin America or Asia, living the American dream means coming of age with a new nation's language, culture, and diet. Translators are hard to come by, apart from team mates. Not only are foreign-born ball players trying to survive in the toughest sport in the land, they're trying to survive in a whole new world.

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