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Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Senseless Reform

  1. #1
    I and many others believe that the immigration reform currently being debated doesn't make sense. It's impractical and adds to the complexity of current laws. Also, replacing a complex law with another complex law would only make those that are affected lose respect for the law. I believe there is a need for continuity. Radical changes like this can only result in crises. There are past provisions, such as 245i, that can be re-introduced. The 245i law by itself is not an amnesty and imposes a strict penalty of $1000, which is unwaived, for those hoping to come out of the shadows. Besides, the 245i does not waive the strict grounds of inadmissability such as criminal, health, etc. There are already people living in the United States without records to show their real identity or even their existence here. These people can at any time voluntarily return to their home countries and return to the United States through a legal channel, without anyone knowing they were previously here. However, the 245i law lures them to come out of their undocumented existence here in the United States and to reveal their true identities. I don't know how any other law can possibly beat that.

    The new bill, however, seeks to only reward the most notorious undocumented immigrants - the ones that not only migrated into the United States through improper channels but also disrespected the laws of the United States further by working when they know they aren't supposed to be doing that. And the new bill seeks to punish only those that are already in the system and trying to do things the proper way - aliens ordered removed for lack of visas who may have legitimate reasons for appeal with appellate boards or the the federal courts. Perphaps these aliens were ordered removed due to ineffective assistance of former counsels or a (human) judge who makes the mistake of improperly applying the law to their circumstances but nevertheless the new bill asks for this category of undocumented immigrants to be immediately imprisoned for as long as it may take for the appellate boards/courts to hear their cases, not considering the fact that they may genuine reasons for appeal; thereby the new bill encourages due process violation and even indefinite detention of individuals for mere immigration status violations.

    And even sadly, the new bill seeks to break family units even further by eliminating most of the categories in which families reunite in the United States.

    As alternatives to the draconian measures currently proposed, the 245i law should be re-introduced or undocumented immigrants should be allowed to apply for work permits. While the mere issuance of work permits to these individuals wouldn't give them a definite status in the United States - perhaps to punish them for their manner of entry - it would lure them to reveal their true identity and allow them to work if they are in the United States. However the mere possesion of a work permit wouldn't give them travel priviledges or any definite status in the United States until they qualify for an immigration benefit under existing laws and meet the existing requirements. And special offices within existing immigration offices can be created for the issuance of work permits to the affected individuals without the risk of deportation unless the applicant is found to have lied on the work permit application. This would enable all immigrants to be able to pay taxes, purchase car insurance, drivers license and the government would have fingerprints and other information about all immigrants in the U.S. So it's a win-win situation for the American economy, government and immigrants. And legal permanent residents and U.S citizens would continue to have more rights than those that only have work permits/identity cards - financial aid in schools, travel priviledges, welfare, etc. Besides by continuing to work in the United States even with work permits, these immigrants are still accruing time that can be used against them in future applications for other immigration benefits.

  2. #2
    I and many others believe that the immigration reform currently being debated doesn't make sense. It's impractical and adds to the complexity of current laws. Also, replacing a complex law with another complex law would only make those that are affected lose respect for the law. I believe there is a need for continuity. Radical changes like this can only result in crises. There are past provisions, such as 245i, that can be re-introduced. The 245i law by itself is not an amnesty and imposes a strict penalty of $1000, which is unwaived, for those hoping to come out of the shadows. Besides, the 245i does not waive the strict grounds of inadmissability such as criminal, health, etc. There are already people living in the United States without records to show their real identity or even their existence here. These people can at any time voluntarily return to their home countries and return to the United States through a legal channel, without anyone knowing they were previously here. However, the 245i law lures them to come out of their undocumented existence here in the United States and to reveal their true identities. I don't know how any other law can possibly beat that.

    The new bill, however, seeks to only reward the most notorious undocumented immigrants - the ones that not only migrated into the United States through improper channels but also disrespected the laws of the United States further by working when they know they aren't supposed to be doing that. And the new bill seeks to punish only those that are already in the system and trying to do things the proper way - aliens ordered removed for lack of visas who may have legitimate reasons for appeal with appellate boards or the the federal courts. Perphaps these aliens were ordered removed due to ineffective assistance of former counsels or a (human) judge who makes the mistake of improperly applying the law to their circumstances but nevertheless the new bill asks for this category of undocumented immigrants to be immediately imprisoned for as long as it may take for the appellate boards/courts to hear their cases, not considering the fact that they may genuine reasons for appeal; thereby the new bill encourages due process violation and even indefinite detention of individuals for mere immigration status violations.

    And even sadly, the new bill seeks to break family units even further by eliminating most of the categories in which families reunite in the United States.

    As alternatives to the draconian measures currently proposed, the 245i law should be re-introduced or undocumented immigrants should be allowed to apply for work permits. While the mere issuance of work permits to these individuals wouldn't give them a definite status in the United States - perhaps to punish them for their manner of entry - it would lure them to reveal their true identity and allow them to work if they are in the United States. However the mere possesion of a work permit wouldn't give them travel priviledges or any definite status in the United States until they qualify for an immigration benefit under existing laws and meet the existing requirements. And special offices within existing immigration offices can be created for the issuance of work permits to the affected individuals without the risk of deportation unless the applicant is found to have lied on the work permit application. This would enable all immigrants to be able to pay taxes, purchase car insurance, drivers license and the government would have fingerprints and other information about all immigrants in the U.S. So it's a win-win situation for the American economy, government and immigrants. And legal permanent residents and U.S citizens would continue to have more rights than those that only have work permits/identity cards - financial aid in schools, travel priviledges, welfare, etc. Besides by continuing to work in the United States even with work permits, these immigrants are still accruing time that can be used against them in future applications for other immigration benefits.

  3. #3
    The new bill can be as simple as "undocumented aliens here on or before January 2007 can now apply for work permits". Less words, less controversies, lesser time to arrive at a conclusion, instead of spending months debating a bill that isn't going anywhere because it's too complex and involves very radical, draconian changes that drift far, far away from the American ideal

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