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Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: what is hate crimes

  1. #1
    Q: Should there be a South Asian community response to hate crimes?
    A: A hate crime does not distinguish between religions, countries of origin, immigration status, or
    socioeconomic status when it is based on a broad characteristic such as race. To the perpetrator, all
    South Asians regardless of race, religion, nationality or immigration status look the same. That is why
    it is important for all South Asians to respond to and address hate crimes when an incident occurs to any
    one of us.
    For example, in Dallas, Texas, a gunman shot and killed a Pakistani man [Waqar Hassan] and an Indian
    man [Vasudev Patel], and attempted to kill a Bangladeshi man [Raishuddin Bhuiyan] shortly after
    September 11th. The perpetrator did not make distinctions between these South Asians based on their
    religion or nationality.
    Q: How many hate crimes generally occur in the country?
    A: The number changes annually. In 2003, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), which is
    responsible for reporting hate crime statistics annually, found that over 5,500 hate crimes against persons
    and 3,139 crimes against property were reported4. Of this number, racial bias motivated more than half
    of the single-bias offenses reported, with religious bias and sexual orientation being the next two bases of
    motivation. Reports of simple and aggravated assault comprised a significant number of the reported
    hate crimes.
    Q: Has the South Asian community historically been the target of hate crimes?
    A: The South Asian community has been the target of hate crimes for decades. In the late
    1980s, a gang called the "Dotbusters" vowed to inflict harm upon South Asians in Jersey City.
    Kaushal Sharan and Navroze Mody were two of the victims of the "Dotbusters."
    In 1998 and 1999, the National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium, an organization that compiles
    data on anti-Asian violence, reported that South Asians comprised the Asian ethnic group with the highest
    number of reported incidents of violence. In 1999, 52 reported incidents involved South Asians; in 1998,
    42 reported incidents involved South Asians5. Two of the hate crimes survivors during that period are
    Rishi Maharaj [a teenager who was beaten on the street in Richmond Hills, Queens by three men telling
    him to "get out of our neighborhood"; the men received sentences for assault]; and Sandip Patel [who was
    shot and paralyzed from the neck down during a shooting rampage in Pittsburgh which left a Jewish
    woman, an African American, and one South Asian murdered.
    As a result of the backlash surrounding the events of 9/11, South Asians were targeted for murders,
    assaults and ethnic slurs. South Asians reported property damage and vandalism to restaurants and
    convenience stores, and to mosques, gurudwaras and temples. A report produced by SAALT entitled
    4 Hate Crimes Statistics 2003, Federal Bureau of Investigation (November 2004) http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/03hc.pdf
    5 See Challenging the Invisibility of Hate: 1999 Audit of Violence Against Asian Pacific Americans; The Need for Increased
    Commitment to Reporting and Community Education: 1998 Audit of Violence Against Asian Pacific Americans. www.napalc.org
    The SAALT Exchange 2005
    American Backlash found that 645 incidents of bias or violence against South Asians and Arab Americans
    were reported in the one week after September 116. According to the report, South Asians were involved
    in 81% of the reported incidents, with Sikhs making up more than half of the total.
    Since the first week of September 11th, the reported incidents of violence only increased, resulting in at
    least five murders and numerous incidents of assault and property damage. The FBI reported a 1600
    percent increase in the number of anti-Muslim hate crimes between 2000 and 2001.7
    While hate crimes related to September 11th have been on the decline, their frequency has not fully
    abated. In February 2005, police in Ceres, California announced that they would be charging the
    perpetrator of a hate crime against Manjit Singh, a postal carrier who was brutally beaten by a man
    affiliated with a white supremacist organization.
    Q: Why are South Asians targeted by hate crimes and bias incidents?
    A: The reason that South Asians were targeted during the backlash after September 11th is clear:
    the perpetrators of violence associated South Asians (especially Sikhs and Muslims) with the terrorists
    who committed the heinous acts against our country. Generally, hate crimes tend to occur when a
    community is seen as being the cause of social or economic problems; or when a community moves into
    a neighborhood that has only been populated by individuals of a particular race or ethnic background.
    Q: What should a victim of a hate crime do?
    A: A victim should first report a hate crime to local police and ensure that the police report identifies
    the crime as a hate crime. The police will then begin an investigation. If the victim (or local police)
    believes that the crime could also be prosecuted under a federal law, it is important to contact the local
    FBI office8 as well. After the investigation has been completed, state and/or federal authorities may bring
    a case in court to try the perpetrators of the crime.
    Q: Are hate crimes usually reported to appropriate law enforcement?
    A: Not always. Hate crimes don't get reported for many reasons. Many people, especially recent
    immigrants, are unfamiliar with our country's legal process or the justice system and don't know how to
    report a hate crime or that they have legal rights. Individuals who are undocumented may be afraid of
    calling attention to their immigration status by reporting a crime. Still others may not be proficient in
    English and may have trouble understanding what their rights are. Finally, many immigrants are
    distrustful of law enforcement or the government in general and may be afraid to report; this has
    especially been the case in today's post 9/11 climate, in which many immigrants fear that reporting hate
    crimes may lead them into investigations regarding their immigration status or ties to terrorist activities.
    6 For a free download of the report, please visit www.saalt.org.
    7 Hate Crime Statistics (2001), Federal Bureau of Investigation (http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/01hate.pdf)
    8 Please check http://www.fbi.gov/contact/fo/info.htm for a list of the FBI's field offices.
    The SAALT Exchange 2005
    RECOMMENDATIONS AND SUGGESTIONS:
    ADDRESSING AND PREVENTING HATE CRIMES/BIAS INCIDENTS
    Our community and other stakeholders, including law enforcement, the media, government agencies and elected
    officials, can take concrete actions to address hate crimes and bias incidents9:
    Improve Community Policing and Responsiveness
    " Law enforcement should be well-trained on how to identify and investigate bias-motivated crimes or
    incidents.
    " Law enforcement should receive cultural sensitivity trainings that include components about the South
    Asian community so that police are able to start their work with South Asians from a place of commonality
    and understanding
    " Law enforcement agencies should develop and distribute in-language educational materials about how,
    where, and to whom to report hate crimes; and conduct informational sessions with South Asian
    community members.
    " Law enforcement should reach out to local leaders in the South Asian community to establish a dialogue
    well before hate crimes and bias incidents begin to occur.
    Investigate, Prosecute, Publicize
    " On the state and federal level, prosecutors should receive assistance and funding to enable effective
    investigations and prosecutions of hate crimes.
    " Prosecutors should publicize any prosecution whether or not successful to the general public and the
    targeted community to send a message that the locality will not tolerate crimes motivated by hate.
    Track and Monitor Hate Crimes and Bias Incidents
    " All local, county, state, and federal law enforcement agencies should cooperate with the Federal Bureau
    of Investigation's National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) program and report all hate crimes
    in their area.
    " Community leaders should develop mechanisms to track and monitor hate crimes [via websites,
    databases, etc]; this information should then be communicated to local authorities with the victim's
    9 These steps are based on recommendations from Anti-Asian Violence Audits (developed by the National Asian Pacific
    American Legal Consortium, and Human Rights Watch).
    The SAALT Exchange 2005
    cooperation.10 Community leaders should then remain in touch with local authorities to monitor the progress
    of the investigation.
    Create Rapid Response Networks
    " Community leaders should develop a rapid response network that is able to quickly respond to a hate
    crime or bias incident. The network should consist of representatives from law enforcement, local
    religious and cultural associations [who may receive first word about a local hate crime], journalists in the
    ethnic and mainstream press who cover the community's stories, representatives from local law
    enforcement, and representatives from social and legal service agencies.
    Enable Community members to Report Hate Crimes
    " Government officials [including the Mayor, Governor, city/state legislature, federal representatives] can
    enable community members to report hate crimes by sending "zero tolerance of hate crimes" messages
    to the general public and by encouraging the community to report crimes without fear. Policies that
    ensure that individuals will not be asked about their immigration status would also ease concerns among
    immigrant communities.
    " Community leaders can encourage the community to report hate crimes by conducting educational
    forums at religious and cultural gatherings, and by making available in-language material about hate
    crimes.
    " The media especially South Asian ethnic press should cover hate crimes in depth and run community
    educational articles on the importance of reporting them to raise community awareness.
    Enact stronger laws to prevent Hate Crimes
    " Strong laws that define hate crimes broadly [to include additional types of motivations for such crimes, for
    example] and that make it easier to investigate and prosecute them will lead to prosecutions of more hate
    crimes. This will send a message to the general public that committing a hate crime in the locality will
    result in serious legal repercussions. For example, the Local Law Enforcement Enhancement Act which
    would strengthen existing federal hate crimes law has been introduced in Congress for several years now
    but has failed to pass.
    " Community members should familiarize themselves with pending federal legislation as well as their state
    laws, and advocate to strengthen them.
    10 For example, the Sikh Coalition is one of many organizations that have websites with bias incident tracking mechanisms

  2. #2
    Q: Should there be a South Asian community response to hate crimes?
    A: A hate crime does not distinguish between religions, countries of origin, immigration status, or
    socioeconomic status when it is based on a broad characteristic such as race. To the perpetrator, all
    South Asians regardless of race, religion, nationality or immigration status look the same. That is why
    it is important for all South Asians to respond to and address hate crimes when an incident occurs to any
    one of us.
    For example, in Dallas, Texas, a gunman shot and killed a Pakistani man [Waqar Hassan] and an Indian
    man [Vasudev Patel], and attempted to kill a Bangladeshi man [Raishuddin Bhuiyan] shortly after
    September 11th. The perpetrator did not make distinctions between these South Asians based on their
    religion or nationality.
    Q: How many hate crimes generally occur in the country?
    A: The number changes annually. In 2003, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), which is
    responsible for reporting hate crime statistics annually, found that over 5,500 hate crimes against persons
    and 3,139 crimes against property were reported4. Of this number, racial bias motivated more than half
    of the single-bias offenses reported, with religious bias and sexual orientation being the next two bases of
    motivation. Reports of simple and aggravated assault comprised a significant number of the reported
    hate crimes.
    Q: Has the South Asian community historically been the target of hate crimes?
    A: The South Asian community has been the target of hate crimes for decades. In the late
    1980s, a gang called the "Dotbusters" vowed to inflict harm upon South Asians in Jersey City.
    Kaushal Sharan and Navroze Mody were two of the victims of the "Dotbusters."
    In 1998 and 1999, the National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium, an organization that compiles
    data on anti-Asian violence, reported that South Asians comprised the Asian ethnic group with the highest
    number of reported incidents of violence. In 1999, 52 reported incidents involved South Asians; in 1998,
    42 reported incidents involved South Asians5. Two of the hate crimes survivors during that period are
    Rishi Maharaj [a teenager who was beaten on the street in Richmond Hills, Queens by three men telling
    him to "get out of our neighborhood"; the men received sentences for assault]; and Sandip Patel [who was
    shot and paralyzed from the neck down during a shooting rampage in Pittsburgh which left a Jewish
    woman, an African American, and one South Asian murdered.
    As a result of the backlash surrounding the events of 9/11, South Asians were targeted for murders,
    assaults and ethnic slurs. South Asians reported property damage and vandalism to restaurants and
    convenience stores, and to mosques, gurudwaras and temples. A report produced by SAALT entitled
    4 Hate Crimes Statistics 2003, Federal Bureau of Investigation (November 2004) http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/03hc.pdf
    5 See Challenging the Invisibility of Hate: 1999 Audit of Violence Against Asian Pacific Americans; The Need for Increased
    Commitment to Reporting and Community Education: 1998 Audit of Violence Against Asian Pacific Americans. www.napalc.org
    The SAALT Exchange 2005
    American Backlash found that 645 incidents of bias or violence against South Asians and Arab Americans
    were reported in the one week after September 116. According to the report, South Asians were involved
    in 81% of the reported incidents, with Sikhs making up more than half of the total.
    Since the first week of September 11th, the reported incidents of violence only increased, resulting in at
    least five murders and numerous incidents of assault and property damage. The FBI reported a 1600
    percent increase in the number of anti-Muslim hate crimes between 2000 and 2001.7
    While hate crimes related to September 11th have been on the decline, their frequency has not fully
    abated. In February 2005, police in Ceres, California announced that they would be charging the
    perpetrator of a hate crime against Manjit Singh, a postal carrier who was brutally beaten by a man
    affiliated with a white supremacist organization.
    Q: Why are South Asians targeted by hate crimes and bias incidents?
    A: The reason that South Asians were targeted during the backlash after September 11th is clear:
    the perpetrators of violence associated South Asians (especially Sikhs and Muslims) with the terrorists
    who committed the heinous acts against our country. Generally, hate crimes tend to occur when a
    community is seen as being the cause of social or economic problems; or when a community moves into
    a neighborhood that has only been populated by individuals of a particular race or ethnic background.
    Q: What should a victim of a hate crime do?
    A: A victim should first report a hate crime to local police and ensure that the police report identifies
    the crime as a hate crime. The police will then begin an investigation. If the victim (or local police)
    believes that the crime could also be prosecuted under a federal law, it is important to contact the local
    FBI office8 as well. After the investigation has been completed, state and/or federal authorities may bring
    a case in court to try the perpetrators of the crime.
    Q: Are hate crimes usually reported to appropriate law enforcement?
    A: Not always. Hate crimes don't get reported for many reasons. Many people, especially recent
    immigrants, are unfamiliar with our country's legal process or the justice system and don't know how to
    report a hate crime or that they have legal rights. Individuals who are undocumented may be afraid of
    calling attention to their immigration status by reporting a crime. Still others may not be proficient in
    English and may have trouble understanding what their rights are. Finally, many immigrants are
    distrustful of law enforcement or the government in general and may be afraid to report; this has
    especially been the case in today's post 9/11 climate, in which many immigrants fear that reporting hate
    crimes may lead them into investigations regarding their immigration status or ties to terrorist activities.
    6 For a free download of the report, please visit www.saalt.org.
    7 Hate Crime Statistics (2001), Federal Bureau of Investigation (http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/01hate.pdf)
    8 Please check http://www.fbi.gov/contact/fo/info.htm for a list of the FBI's field offices.
    The SAALT Exchange 2005
    RECOMMENDATIONS AND SUGGESTIONS:
    ADDRESSING AND PREVENTING HATE CRIMES/BIAS INCIDENTS
    Our community and other stakeholders, including law enforcement, the media, government agencies and elected
    officials, can take concrete actions to address hate crimes and bias incidents9:
    Improve Community Policing and Responsiveness
    " Law enforcement should be well-trained on how to identify and investigate bias-motivated crimes or
    incidents.
    " Law enforcement should receive cultural sensitivity trainings that include components about the South
    Asian community so that police are able to start their work with South Asians from a place of commonality
    and understanding
    " Law enforcement agencies should develop and distribute in-language educational materials about how,
    where, and to whom to report hate crimes; and conduct informational sessions with South Asian
    community members.
    " Law enforcement should reach out to local leaders in the South Asian community to establish a dialogue
    well before hate crimes and bias incidents begin to occur.
    Investigate, Prosecute, Publicize
    " On the state and federal level, prosecutors should receive assistance and funding to enable effective
    investigations and prosecutions of hate crimes.
    " Prosecutors should publicize any prosecution whether or not successful to the general public and the
    targeted community to send a message that the locality will not tolerate crimes motivated by hate.
    Track and Monitor Hate Crimes and Bias Incidents
    " All local, county, state, and federal law enforcement agencies should cooperate with the Federal Bureau
    of Investigation's National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) program and report all hate crimes
    in their area.
    " Community leaders should develop mechanisms to track and monitor hate crimes [via websites,
    databases, etc]; this information should then be communicated to local authorities with the victim's
    9 These steps are based on recommendations from Anti-Asian Violence Audits (developed by the National Asian Pacific
    American Legal Consortium, and Human Rights Watch).
    The SAALT Exchange 2005
    cooperation.10 Community leaders should then remain in touch with local authorities to monitor the progress
    of the investigation.
    Create Rapid Response Networks
    " Community leaders should develop a rapid response network that is able to quickly respond to a hate
    crime or bias incident. The network should consist of representatives from law enforcement, local
    religious and cultural associations [who may receive first word about a local hate crime], journalists in the
    ethnic and mainstream press who cover the community's stories, representatives from local law
    enforcement, and representatives from social and legal service agencies.
    Enable Community members to Report Hate Crimes
    " Government officials [including the Mayor, Governor, city/state legislature, federal representatives] can
    enable community members to report hate crimes by sending "zero tolerance of hate crimes" messages
    to the general public and by encouraging the community to report crimes without fear. Policies that
    ensure that individuals will not be asked about their immigration status would also ease concerns among
    immigrant communities.
    " Community leaders can encourage the community to report hate crimes by conducting educational
    forums at religious and cultural gatherings, and by making available in-language material about hate
    crimes.
    " The media especially South Asian ethnic press should cover hate crimes in depth and run community
    educational articles on the importance of reporting them to raise community awareness.
    Enact stronger laws to prevent Hate Crimes
    " Strong laws that define hate crimes broadly [to include additional types of motivations for such crimes, for
    example] and that make it easier to investigate and prosecute them will lead to prosecutions of more hate
    crimes. This will send a message to the general public that committing a hate crime in the locality will
    result in serious legal repercussions. For example, the Local Law Enforcement Enhancement Act which
    would strengthen existing federal hate crimes law has been introduced in Congress for several years now
    but has failed to pass.
    " Community members should familiarize themselves with pending federal legislation as well as their state
    laws, and advocate to strengthen them.
    10 For example, the Sikh Coalition is one of many organizations that have websites with bias incident tracking mechanisms

  3. #3
    Hi Mike


    could you please limit these threads to just one area.. maybe one called "Mikes News" or something. everybody else has already stopped the multiple postings to let the board get back to normal to let new members and posters participate normally again.

    Your missions have already been accomplished..

  4. #4

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