ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: immigration situations

  1. #1

  2. #2
    [Broken record=on]
    1. Definitely seek the advice of an immigration attorney on this one.
    [Broken record=off]

    2. So if I understand you correctly, your USC parent died. Unfortunately, I fear this does limit your brother's options because he can't be petitioned as a child of a USC (if under 21), or under Family Second Preference (if over 21 and unmarried).

    3. Hopefully you know this already, but I would not _not_ NOT *NOT* cross the border or leave the country until your adjustment of status get successfully taken care of. At least once you get the green card, you'll at least have the ability to visit Mexico as often as needed. Until then, I can't tell how much unlawful presence you may have accumulated over time, and that alone might make it difficult to return to the U.S. once you leave. I believe this is true even if you receive travel documents under Advance Parole. There's simply no guarantee that you will be allowed to return even if you get Advance Parole while your I-485 is in process.

    4. If, when becoming a permanent resident, you might decide to become a USC (a process that for you would require at least three years of residency--for others, it would be five years). When you become a citizen, it's a good news/bad news scenario. The good news is that you may be then be able to sponsor your brother for a visa. The bad news is that he would be under the Family 4th Preference category, which right now has a 14-year backlog.

    5. He might be able to come to the U.S. sooner than 14 years if he is trained in a skill that is officially recognized as being needed. A lot of people in the Philippines go to nursing school for precisely this reason. I don't know what other skills or occupations would fit in this category.

    I don't know what other options would be viable. I hope others can shed further light on this. It's a tough situation, I realize, but you know already how U.S. immigration policy already is, and it doesn't look it's going to be easier anytime soon. Keep the faith. --SJR
    ____________
    I'm just a J.D. I cannot give legal advice, except for the following:
    See a reputable immigration attorney for help.

  3. #3
    thanks and I WILL NOT GO TO MEXICO UNTIL MY ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS IS TAKEN CARE OF!!

  4. #4
    There's always the F1 & Employment route.
    There's also the marriage route (providing he can married a USC).
    I'm sure there're other temporary worker permits that he can obtained. The matter is far from closed.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-21-2012, 09:07 AM
  2. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 08-31-2011, 07:22 AM
  3. The End Result: When Immigration Attorneys Evade Immigration Laws
    By Cheryl D. Uzamere in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 97
    Last Post: 01-29-2009, 03:33 PM
  4. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-24-2006, 05:47 AM
  5. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 08-08-2003, 03:25 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: