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Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Peace in Lebanon

  1. #1
    Peace in Lebanon?


    Is there even a chance that United Nations Security Council Resolution 1701 will actually work? This resolution would end all hostilities on Lebanese territory between the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) and the Hezbollah, a paramilitary group operating in Lebanon, as of eight in the morning today in Lebanon.

    Does it actually have a chance of achieving lasting peace in Lebanon? Probably not.

    Every reference to Hezbollah goes back to 1982, when Israeli forces invaded Lebanon. They call it a terrorist organization that has put on a veneer of legitimacy by successfully launching a legitimate political party that today has 14 members in the 128-member Lebanese parliament. Still, the main reason Hezbollah even exists is to oppose Israel and, if possible, erase the country from the face of the earth.

    The UN resolution is welcome to both sides because the fighting has been a painful experience all-around.

    It is apparent that the political leadership of Israel was misled by its military leaders into believing that a quick victory over the Hezbollah was possible, The civilian government led by Ehud Olmert, former deputy prime minister who has been criticized in the Israeli press as being more suited to be trade minister instead of prime minister, probably also overbought the military's optimistic forecasts.

    Yet, in the four weeks of daily missile, rocket and artillery exchanges, the IDF has not been able to claim even limited victories against the Hezbollah guerrillas. In fact, the reverse seems to be true. The IDF has not made a dent on the guerrillas. Thus, the recent invasion of Lebanon has turned out for Israel to have been a big mistake, an action that was forced upon Israel by circumstances and which may not have been carefully thought through before committing the country and its forces to the fight.

    There is also speculation in Israel itself that the people now in charge may not be Israel's A-team and that others ought to take over to run the country and its battles properly. The prime minister and the foreign minister have been criticizing each other openly during the four weeks.

    Attacking guerrilla positions is always fraught with the possibility of failure because guerrillas, by their very nature, will blend with the populace and will be difficult to even find when they do not have a gun in their hand pointed at your.

    What we can hope for is that the temporary respite (because that is really all we can hope for) will convince many of the combatants of the futility of using rockets, missiles and artillery shells to put one's arguments to those on the other side of the battlefield. An who are good at using force to send their message? Our very own America and the allies.

  2. #2
    Peace in Lebanon?


    Is there even a chance that United Nations Security Council Resolution 1701 will actually work? This resolution would end all hostilities on Lebanese territory between the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) and the Hezbollah, a paramilitary group operating in Lebanon, as of eight in the morning today in Lebanon.

    Does it actually have a chance of achieving lasting peace in Lebanon? Probably not.

    Every reference to Hezbollah goes back to 1982, when Israeli forces invaded Lebanon. They call it a terrorist organization that has put on a veneer of legitimacy by successfully launching a legitimate political party that today has 14 members in the 128-member Lebanese parliament. Still, the main reason Hezbollah even exists is to oppose Israel and, if possible, erase the country from the face of the earth.

    The UN resolution is welcome to both sides because the fighting has been a painful experience all-around.

    It is apparent that the political leadership of Israel was misled by its military leaders into believing that a quick victory over the Hezbollah was possible, The civilian government led by Ehud Olmert, former deputy prime minister who has been criticized in the Israeli press as being more suited to be trade minister instead of prime minister, probably also overbought the military's optimistic forecasts.

    Yet, in the four weeks of daily missile, rocket and artillery exchanges, the IDF has not been able to claim even limited victories against the Hezbollah guerrillas. In fact, the reverse seems to be true. The IDF has not made a dent on the guerrillas. Thus, the recent invasion of Lebanon has turned out for Israel to have been a big mistake, an action that was forced upon Israel by circumstances and which may not have been carefully thought through before committing the country and its forces to the fight.

    There is also speculation in Israel itself that the people now in charge may not be Israel's A-team and that others ought to take over to run the country and its battles properly. The prime minister and the foreign minister have been criticizing each other openly during the four weeks.

    Attacking guerrilla positions is always fraught with the possibility of failure because guerrillas, by their very nature, will blend with the populace and will be difficult to even find when they do not have a gun in their hand pointed at your.

    What we can hope for is that the temporary respite (because that is really all we can hope for) will convince many of the combatants of the futility of using rockets, missiles and artillery shells to put one's arguments to those on the other side of the battlefield. An who are good at using force to send their message? Our very own America and the allies.

  3. #3
    Yes there can be peace in Lebanon, and the whole region.
    The best would be to cancel the UN resolution 181, dated November 29, 1947.
    History will look back at it as an experiment gone wrong.

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