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Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Foam at the mouth, Bev: Another illegal from Mexico is welcomed to the USA

  1. #1
    Oh, and his 7 children too, plus his wife. And later, his sibblings and their families. And his wife can later apply for her relatives, and so on. Chain immigration, you now...

    Of course, the chickens they all own can be brought inmediately, since they don't need visas.


    http://www.azstarnet.com/dailystar/214866

    Tucson Region

    Praise for a hero and guardian angel

    Border ceremony honors boy's lifesaver

    By Brady McCombs
    Arizona Daily Star
    Tucson, Arizona | Published: 12.05.2007

    NOGALES "Ē After receiving his fifth plaque and yet another round of applause "Ē cameras popping and lights flashing on his face the entire time "Ē Manuel Jes√ļs C√≥rdova Soberanes crouched in his chair, hands over his eyes.

    During a ceremony Tuesday morning inside the Dennis DeConcini port of entry in Nogales, officials from both sides of the border showered the 26-year-old from Magdalena de Kino, Sonora, with thanks and recognition for his decision on Thanksgiving night to give up his desert journey into the United States and stay with a 9-year-old boy he found alone, Christopher Buchleitner.

    A regular Joe, or José, a month ago, Córdova has become a binational celebrity and now finds himself in position to possibly earn a legal ticket into the United States.

    "I still can't believe it," said the 26-year-old, soft-spoken Córdova after Tuesday's ceremony.
    Calling him a hero and guardian angel, those who spoke Tuesday said Córdova's story demonstrates that most illegal entrants are good, honest people coming for work; not criminals as some cast them.

    "This man, this hero, did what men of honor do in all nations and in all cultures", said Beatriz L√≥pez Gargallo, Mexican consul general in Nogales. "He supplied protection and care. Fortunately for Christopher, the 9-year-old, Manuel Jes√ļs was there."

    The oft-repeated story goes like this: At about 5 p.m. Thanksgiving evening west of Pe√Īa Blanca Lake, about 60 miles southwest of Tucson, C√≥rdova encountered Christopher in shorts and a T-shirt walking with his golden retriever, Tanner.

    Christopher and his mother, Dawn Alice Tomko, 45, had been camping in the area. While driving on a narrow dirt road, she lost control of their van, hit an embankment and fell off a cliff about 275 feet. She died. Christopher and his dogs walked away with only ***ps and bruises.

    Córdova, who had been walking alone for 2 1/2 days in his second attempt at illegal entry into the country, stayed with the boy through the night, building a fire, getting him food and giving him a sweater. In the morning, he found a pair of hunters who called authorities.

    Christopher was flown to University Medical Center in Tucson and Córdova turned himself in to Border Patrol agents and was returned to Mexico that same day.
    Santa Cruz County Sheriff Tony Estrada has said that he likely saved Christopher's life. The area of the crash was a rough, remote area and it was a cold night. Had Córdova not been there, nobody knows what would have happened to the boy, Estrada said.

    Rio Rico Fire District firefighters, who were the first to arrive at the scene the next morning, agree. They were so touched by Córdova's actions that they insisted that Córdova receive some kind of honor, said Michael Foster, Rio Rico Fire District chief.

    "He compassionately sacrificed his plans, his goals, his objectives for the betterment of individual who needed help. In essence, he did the right thing," said Foster, who prepared a presentation about the events entitled, "Shared Humanity, a ceremony to appreciate Manuel Jesus Cordova."
    "Was it a moral obligation? Was it fate? Was it karma? All of those could be your own interpretation," he said.

    One of the facts that have led some to conclude that the encounter was meant to happen, perhaps destiny, is that Christopher and Córdova have the same birthday: July 30.

    "As I have said to everybody, the boy was asking for help from him and he of the boy," said Córdova's mother, Alma Lydia Soberanes, who was brought to tears during the ceremony. "He was an angel for the boy and the boy for him."

    Christopher wasn't in attendance Tuesday. He is in the Farmington, N.M., area with his uncle and aunt, David and Janice Tomko. The family is very grateful to Córdova but Christopher couldn't travel to Nogales because of their busy schedule, said David Tomko.

    His mother's death left him an orphan. His father, Jack Buchleitner, committed suicide on Labor Day.

    Christopher spent last week in his hometown of Rimrock, where he went to school a few days, saw his friends and gathered his things, David Tomko said. They are planning on driving to the Pittsburgh area later this week with the boy's two dogs and a cat. There, he'll meet up with family members from his dad's side of the family, Tomko said.

    Other than a few sad moments, Christopher is acting like a normal 9-year-old, Tomko said. He hasn't talked much at all about the wreck, likely his way of dealing with it, he said.

    A Wells Fargo bank account for Christopher's education fund has been set up. One has also been set up for Córdova and his family.
    Córdova will be receiving Christmas gifts, too. On Dec. 15, Tucson businessman Bob Feinman and Humane Borders volunteers are planning to travel to Magdalena de Kino and deliver household items, clothes, food and maybe some toys for Córdova and his children. They are coordinating with the Mayor's Office in Magdalena de Kino, Sonora, so they can buy Córdova and his family what they need, Feinman said.

    Córdova also learned Tuesday that U.S. Rep. Rául Grijalva plans to introduce a private bill aimed at acquiring a visa for him to re-enter the country legally.
    "God bless him. The man saved a life and he deserves this consideration," Grijalva said.
    But getting that visa is probably a long shot, said Ruben Reyes, a Grijalva aide who was at Tuesday's ceremony. These kinds of bills usually have a difficult time getting through Congress, he said.

    "Unfortunately, the immigration debate is so divisive and so ugly right now that even a compelling, Good Samaritan story like this will end up with opposition," Grijalva said.

    Córdova's history of apprehensions by the Border Patrol is still unclear. He said Tuesday he has been apprehended twice, the first resulting in a formal deportation, which would carry a five-year ban on legal re-entry.

    But a Border Patrol inquiry found that he has never been formally removed, or deported, which would mean he's not banned from legal re-entry of applying for a visa, said Richard DeWitt, Border Patrol Tucson Sector spokesman.

    Grijavla's office is in the process of gathering information from the Border Patrol about Córdova's history of apprehensions to decide how to write the bill, Reyes said. So far, there are no indications of criminal activity in his past.

    "Even if he has been detained by the Border Patrol several times, his actions still warrant this merit," Reyes said.
    Córdova, who is currently working for city public works in Magdalena de Kino, Sonora, said he would love to obtain a work visa. His current job pays decent but it's not enough to take care of the seven children he supports, he said. Plus, it would mean he would never have to make another desert crossing.
    "If they give it to me I'll be able to cross comfortably without having to walk much," he said.

    No matter what happens, Córdova and his mother are appreciative of the recognition and trying to enjoy the spotlight.
    "We're more famous than Britney Spears," joked his mom, Alma Lydia Soberanes, in Spanish, as a line of reporters waited in line to talk to the pair.

    ‚óŹ Contact reporter Brady McCombs at 573-4213 or bmccombs@azstarnet.com

  2. #2
    Oh, and his 7 children too, plus his wife. And later, his sibblings and their families. And his wife can later apply for her relatives, and so on. Chain immigration, you now...

    Of course, the chickens they all own can be brought inmediately, since they don't need visas.


    http://www.azstarnet.com/dailystar/214866

    Tucson Region

    Praise for a hero and guardian angel

    Border ceremony honors boy's lifesaver

    By Brady McCombs
    Arizona Daily Star
    Tucson, Arizona | Published: 12.05.2007

    NOGALES "Ē After receiving his fifth plaque and yet another round of applause "Ē cameras popping and lights flashing on his face the entire time "Ē Manuel Jes√ļs C√≥rdova Soberanes crouched in his chair, hands over his eyes.

    During a ceremony Tuesday morning inside the Dennis DeConcini port of entry in Nogales, officials from both sides of the border showered the 26-year-old from Magdalena de Kino, Sonora, with thanks and recognition for his decision on Thanksgiving night to give up his desert journey into the United States and stay with a 9-year-old boy he found alone, Christopher Buchleitner.

    A regular Joe, or José, a month ago, Córdova has become a binational celebrity and now finds himself in position to possibly earn a legal ticket into the United States.

    "I still can't believe it," said the 26-year-old, soft-spoken Córdova after Tuesday's ceremony.
    Calling him a hero and guardian angel, those who spoke Tuesday said Córdova's story demonstrates that most illegal entrants are good, honest people coming for work; not criminals as some cast them.

    "This man, this hero, did what men of honor do in all nations and in all cultures", said Beatriz L√≥pez Gargallo, Mexican consul general in Nogales. "He supplied protection and care. Fortunately for Christopher, the 9-year-old, Manuel Jes√ļs was there."

    The oft-repeated story goes like this: At about 5 p.m. Thanksgiving evening west of Pe√Īa Blanca Lake, about 60 miles southwest of Tucson, C√≥rdova encountered Christopher in shorts and a T-shirt walking with his golden retriever, Tanner.

    Christopher and his mother, Dawn Alice Tomko, 45, had been camping in the area. While driving on a narrow dirt road, she lost control of their van, hit an embankment and fell off a cliff about 275 feet. She died. Christopher and his dogs walked away with only ***ps and bruises.

    Córdova, who had been walking alone for 2 1/2 days in his second attempt at illegal entry into the country, stayed with the boy through the night, building a fire, getting him food and giving him a sweater. In the morning, he found a pair of hunters who called authorities.

    Christopher was flown to University Medical Center in Tucson and Córdova turned himself in to Border Patrol agents and was returned to Mexico that same day.
    Santa Cruz County Sheriff Tony Estrada has said that he likely saved Christopher's life. The area of the crash was a rough, remote area and it was a cold night. Had Córdova not been there, nobody knows what would have happened to the boy, Estrada said.

    Rio Rico Fire District firefighters, who were the first to arrive at the scene the next morning, agree. They were so touched by Córdova's actions that they insisted that Córdova receive some kind of honor, said Michael Foster, Rio Rico Fire District chief.

    "He compassionately sacrificed his plans, his goals, his objectives for the betterment of individual who needed help. In essence, he did the right thing," said Foster, who prepared a presentation about the events entitled, "Shared Humanity, a ceremony to appreciate Manuel Jesus Cordova."
    "Was it a moral obligation? Was it fate? Was it karma? All of those could be your own interpretation," he said.

    One of the facts that have led some to conclude that the encounter was meant to happen, perhaps destiny, is that Christopher and Córdova have the same birthday: July 30.

    "As I have said to everybody, the boy was asking for help from him and he of the boy," said Córdova's mother, Alma Lydia Soberanes, who was brought to tears during the ceremony. "He was an angel for the boy and the boy for him."

    Christopher wasn't in attendance Tuesday. He is in the Farmington, N.M., area with his uncle and aunt, David and Janice Tomko. The family is very grateful to Córdova but Christopher couldn't travel to Nogales because of their busy schedule, said David Tomko.

    His mother's death left him an orphan. His father, Jack Buchleitner, committed suicide on Labor Day.

    Christopher spent last week in his hometown of Rimrock, where he went to school a few days, saw his friends and gathered his things, David Tomko said. They are planning on driving to the Pittsburgh area later this week with the boy's two dogs and a cat. There, he'll meet up with family members from his dad's side of the family, Tomko said.

    Other than a few sad moments, Christopher is acting like a normal 9-year-old, Tomko said. He hasn't talked much at all about the wreck, likely his way of dealing with it, he said.

    A Wells Fargo bank account for Christopher's education fund has been set up. One has also been set up for Córdova and his family.
    Córdova will be receiving Christmas gifts, too. On Dec. 15, Tucson businessman Bob Feinman and Humane Borders volunteers are planning to travel to Magdalena de Kino and deliver household items, clothes, food and maybe some toys for Córdova and his children. They are coordinating with the Mayor's Office in Magdalena de Kino, Sonora, so they can buy Córdova and his family what they need, Feinman said.

    Córdova also learned Tuesday that U.S. Rep. Rául Grijalva plans to introduce a private bill aimed at acquiring a visa for him to re-enter the country legally.
    "God bless him. The man saved a life and he deserves this consideration," Grijalva said.
    But getting that visa is probably a long shot, said Ruben Reyes, a Grijalva aide who was at Tuesday's ceremony. These kinds of bills usually have a difficult time getting through Congress, he said.

    "Unfortunately, the immigration debate is so divisive and so ugly right now that even a compelling, Good Samaritan story like this will end up with opposition," Grijalva said.

    Córdova's history of apprehensions by the Border Patrol is still unclear. He said Tuesday he has been apprehended twice, the first resulting in a formal deportation, which would carry a five-year ban on legal re-entry.

    But a Border Patrol inquiry found that he has never been formally removed, or deported, which would mean he's not banned from legal re-entry of applying for a visa, said Richard DeWitt, Border Patrol Tucson Sector spokesman.

    Grijavla's office is in the process of gathering information from the Border Patrol about Córdova's history of apprehensions to decide how to write the bill, Reyes said. So far, there are no indications of criminal activity in his past.

    "Even if he has been detained by the Border Patrol several times, his actions still warrant this merit," Reyes said.
    Córdova, who is currently working for city public works in Magdalena de Kino, Sonora, said he would love to obtain a work visa. His current job pays decent but it's not enough to take care of the seven children he supports, he said. Plus, it would mean he would never have to make another desert crossing.
    "If they give it to me I'll be able to cross comfortably without having to walk much," he said.

    No matter what happens, Córdova and his mother are appreciative of the recognition and trying to enjoy the spotlight.
    "We're more famous than Britney Spears," joked his mom, Alma Lydia Soberanes, in Spanish, as a line of reporters waited in line to talk to the pair.

    ‚óŹ Contact reporter Brady McCombs at 573-4213 or bmccombs@azstarnet.com

  3. #3
    Yes, indeed, it's one of the greatest gifts of all: THE GIFT OF LIFE.

    It should be held sacred every second, every minute, every hour, everyday... yes, on either side of the BORDER.

    Once again, thanks whknapp for sharing.

  4. #4
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Córdova's history of apprehensions by the Border Patrol is still unclear. He said Tuesday he has been apprehended twice, the first resulting in a formal deportation, which would carry a five-year ban on legal re-entry.

    But a Border Patrol inquiry found that he has never been formally removed, or deported, which would mean he's not banned from legal re-entry of applying for a visa, said Richard DeWitt, Border Patrol Tucson Sector spokesman.

    Grijavla's office is in the process of gathering information from the Border Patrol about Córdova's history of apprehensions to decide how to write the bill, Reyes said. So far, there are no indications of criminal activity in his past. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>



    OH Good grief...Davdah. Man.. I leave the board for a couple of weeks and all kind of wars are breaking out here. lol


    in anyway... Like you said DAvdah.. a private bill ins being introduced by probably a disreputable./misrepresentative.

    This would be disgraceful to bend the rules for a habitual illegal entry and give him a green card. Even looking for technicalities to be able to go around the bar. He did a good deed for a human life.. what does this have to do with giving a greencard???

  5. #5
    Someone12
    Guest
    sorry, but in spite of this person's good deed, getting a GC free of charge won't happen...why? because, if it did, every douchebag crossing the Rio Grande would start 'saving each other' from drowning or whatever...one cannot reward (this generously) this behavior...now, should this twice (or more) EWI get a break on his ineligibility? I would say yes....but....he still has to qualify for any immigration benefit....no jumping the line...note proudusc, I didn't say this guy should be deported without recourse.....read my posting again, $hithead

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