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Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: ARIZONA GORVERNOR VETOES ANTI-IMMIGRATION BILL

  1. #1
    WAY TO GO NAPOLITANO


    ------

    Napolitano vetoes effort to criminalize illegal immigrants' presence in Arizona
    April 18, 2006 07:38 AM PDT


    Gov. Janet Napolitano vetoed a bill Monday that would have criminalized the presence of illegal immigrants in Arizona, citing opposition from police agencies that want immigration arrests to remain the responsibility of the federal government.


    The proposal would have expanded the state's trespassing law to let local authorities arrest illegal immigrants anywhere in Arizona, the nation's busiest illegal entry point.

    Congress also had considered criminalizing the presence of illegal immigrants in the country.


    In a letter to lawmakers, Napolitano said she opposes automatically turning all immigrants who sneaked into the state into criminals and that the bill provided no funding for the new duties.

    "It is unfortunate that the Legislature has once again ignored the officials who are most directly affected by illegal immigration and instead has passed yet another bill that will have no effect on the problem but that will impose an unfunded burden on law enforcement," Napolitano wrote.

    Supporters said the bill would have given Arizona a chance to get a handle on its vast border problems by providing a second layer of enforcement to catch the tens of thousands of immigrants who slip past federal agents each year.

    Opponents said it was an unconstitutional attempt to get local police to regulate federal immigration law and would have detracted from the traditional role that local police play in cracking down on thefts, violence and other crimes.

    State politicians facing re-election races are feeling pressure to confront illegal immigration, a problem that until recent years had been considered the sole province of the federal government.

    While immigrants provide the economy with cheap labor, Arizona spends tens of millions of dollars each year in health care and education costs for illegal workers and their families. An estimated 500,000 of the state's population of about 6 million are illegal immigrants.

    Using an approach similar to the Arizona bill, police in two New Hampshire towns arrested illegal immigrants on trespassing charges last year. The cases were dismissed after a judge ruled that the tactic was unconstitutional.

    The U.S. House voted last year to make being an illegal immigrant a felony, a provision later stripped out by a Senate committee.

    A first offense under Arizona's trespassing proposal would have been a top-tier misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail. Subsequent offenses would have been a low-level felony carrying a prison sentence of up to one year.

    Republican Sen. Barbara Leff of Paradise Valley, who proposed the bill, said the governor has painted herself as tough on illegal immigration by declaring a state of emergency at Arizona's border, but has taken little action to back up her rhetoric.

    "I don't think the governor wants to do anything about this problem," Leff said.

    Supporters of the bill said a separate plan moving through the Legislature would provided communities with $30 million for immigration efforts, including enforcing an expanded trespassing law.

    Leff said the bill would have been a means to detain illegal immigrants until federal agents can pick them up.

    The governor said a misdemeanor trespassing violation won't deter illegal immigration.

    Police agencies said they don't have the legal authority to detain illegal immigrants, unless they have violated state law.

    Opponents said the bill would have jeopardized the trust that police officers have built with immigrant communities in encouraging them to report crime.

    Immigrant rights groups said they fear local police agencies' lack of training in immigration law could lead to racial profiling.

    The political movement for the state to lessen its border problems began with a voter-approved law in 2004 that denied some government benefits to illegal immigrants and continued last year when the governor signed into law a bill creating the state crime of immigrant smuggling.

    The Democratic governor, accused by her Republican critics of being soft on immigration, has vetoed other immigration bills from the GOP-majority Legislature within the past year, including a proposal to give police the power to enforce federal immigration laws.

  2. #2
    WAY TO GO NAPOLITANO


    ------

    Napolitano vetoes effort to criminalize illegal immigrants' presence in Arizona
    April 18, 2006 07:38 AM PDT


    Gov. Janet Napolitano vetoed a bill Monday that would have criminalized the presence of illegal immigrants in Arizona, citing opposition from police agencies that want immigration arrests to remain the responsibility of the federal government.


    The proposal would have expanded the state's trespassing law to let local authorities arrest illegal immigrants anywhere in Arizona, the nation's busiest illegal entry point.

    Congress also had considered criminalizing the presence of illegal immigrants in the country.


    In a letter to lawmakers, Napolitano said she opposes automatically turning all immigrants who sneaked into the state into criminals and that the bill provided no funding for the new duties.

    "It is unfortunate that the Legislature has once again ignored the officials who are most directly affected by illegal immigration and instead has passed yet another bill that will have no effect on the problem but that will impose an unfunded burden on law enforcement," Napolitano wrote.

    Supporters said the bill would have given Arizona a chance to get a handle on its vast border problems by providing a second layer of enforcement to catch the tens of thousands of immigrants who slip past federal agents each year.

    Opponents said it was an unconstitutional attempt to get local police to regulate federal immigration law and would have detracted from the traditional role that local police play in cracking down on thefts, violence and other crimes.

    State politicians facing re-election races are feeling pressure to confront illegal immigration, a problem that until recent years had been considered the sole province of the federal government.

    While immigrants provide the economy with cheap labor, Arizona spends tens of millions of dollars each year in health care and education costs for illegal workers and their families. An estimated 500,000 of the state's population of about 6 million are illegal immigrants.

    Using an approach similar to the Arizona bill, police in two New Hampshire towns arrested illegal immigrants on trespassing charges last year. The cases were dismissed after a judge ruled that the tactic was unconstitutional.

    The U.S. House voted last year to make being an illegal immigrant a felony, a provision later stripped out by a Senate committee.

    A first offense under Arizona's trespassing proposal would have been a top-tier misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail. Subsequent offenses would have been a low-level felony carrying a prison sentence of up to one year.

    Republican Sen. Barbara Leff of Paradise Valley, who proposed the bill, said the governor has painted herself as tough on illegal immigration by declaring a state of emergency at Arizona's border, but has taken little action to back up her rhetoric.

    "I don't think the governor wants to do anything about this problem," Leff said.

    Supporters of the bill said a separate plan moving through the Legislature would provided communities with $30 million for immigration efforts, including enforcing an expanded trespassing law.

    Leff said the bill would have been a means to detain illegal immigrants until federal agents can pick them up.

    The governor said a misdemeanor trespassing violation won't deter illegal immigration.

    Police agencies said they don't have the legal authority to detain illegal immigrants, unless they have violated state law.

    Opponents said the bill would have jeopardized the trust that police officers have built with immigrant communities in encouraging them to report crime.

    Immigrant rights groups said they fear local police agencies' lack of training in immigration law could lead to racial profiling.

    The political movement for the state to lessen its border problems began with a voter-approved law in 2004 that denied some government benefits to illegal immigrants and continued last year when the governor signed into law a bill creating the state crime of immigrant smuggling.

    The Democratic governor, accused by her Republican critics of being soft on immigration, has vetoed other immigration bills from the GOP-majority Legislature within the past year, including a proposal to give police the power to enforce federal immigration laws.

  3. #3
    NAPOLITANO SPEAKS FOR THE PEOPLE OF ARIZONA...ANYTHING THAT DOESNT HANDLE THE IMMIGRANTS IN ARIZONA THAT ARE UNDOCUMENTED, WONT GET PASS NAPO!! NAPO IS MY HERO!!

  4. #4
    Governor Napolitano will be looking for a new job on November 8, 2006.

  5. #5
    Ms Napolitano will be re elected by the great people of arizona...the people of arizona sees her as a strong woman that wont back down fom bigots like sundevilusa and others..for that reason, he people of arizona loves her...polls shows that she's leading by a large margin in the polls.

  6. #6
    The only poll that matters will be held on November 7, 2006.

  7. #7
    napolitano will easily win the upcoming election because she's very popular around arizona, sorry to break it to you, you bigot.

  8. #8
    Jean2005: What do you even know about Arizona?

    The last time you were in the state, you were illegally being smuggled through on your way to New York.

    I think that you underestimate the anger in this state...and across the country...with regard to illegal immigration.

    Governor Napolitano vetoed a Bill that had popular support...and she will pay a price at the polls in November.

  9. #9
    sorry buddy, but i hate to let you know hat she enjoys a good approval ratings..shes extremily popular and newsreporters in arizona predicts she's a sure in for re elections.

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