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Page 204 of 204 FirstFirst ... 104154194202203204
Results 2,031 to 2,038 of 2038

Thread: Presidential candidates and their stand on immigration

  1. #2031
    Voters Decide on Divisive Social Issues Nationwide

    Hot-button issues like *** marriage, abortion and affirmative action will be on the ballot in 36 states.

    Tuesday, November 04, 2008

    Some of the nation's most polarizing social issues, including *** marriage and abortion, came to the fore Tuesday as voters in 36 states were deciding on a slew of ballot initiatives.

    Nationwide, 153 measures are on the docket, none so hotly contested as California's Proposition 8, which would outlaw *** marriage in the state. Opposing sides have raised $74 million in the ***-marriage battle, believed to be a record for such a campaign.

    Following is a list of the nation's biggest ballot initiatives.

    *** Marriage

    -- California's Proposition 8 would ban same-*** marriage in the state, which has seen thousands of such marriages since it was made legal in May. California voters outlawed *** marriage in 2000, but the state Supreme Court overturned the measure six months ago, saying it violated the state constitution. Proposition 8 would reverse that ruling and allow voters to amend their state constitution to ban *** marriage. The most recent poll by California's Field Research Corporation showed the measure to ban *** marriage was losing, 49-44 percent. But confusion could reign at the ballot box since a vote "yes" on the initiative would mean support for a ban and a vote "no" would be support for *** marriage.

    -- Arizona's Proposition 102 would define marriage as the union of a man and a woman; it had majority support in recent polling.

    -- Florida's Amendment 2, which would similarly define marriage as between a man and a woman, was leading in recent polling, but may not capture the 60 percent necessary to pass.

    Abortion

    -- Colorado's Amendment 48, which defines a "person" to include "any human being from the moment of fertilization," would ban abortion in the state. The initiative -- proposed by the anti-abortion group Colorado for Equal Rights -- is intended to provide fetuses with equal constitutional rights and would define abortion as an act of murder. It makes no exception for cases of rape or when the life of the mother is at risk. The measure is not expected to pass.

    -- South Dakota's Measure 11 would ban abortion but allow for exceptions in cases of rape, incest or when the life of the mother is at risk. South Dakota voters in 2006 overturned a state law that banned abortion but did not allow for those exceptions. Recent polling shows the measure's outcome is too close to call. It could trigger a Supreme Court case if it passes.

    Assisted Suicide

    -- Washington's I-1000 initiative would allow terminally ill patients to commit suicide with the help of a doctor. Polling shows the measure far ahead, 52-25 percent, according to the Initiative and Referendum Institute at the University of Southern California. Oregon is the only other state with a similar law.

    Racial Preferences

    -- Colorado's Amendment 46 would end all affirmative action programs in the state and ban racial preferences in public employment and higher education. The initiative was sponsored by Ward Connerly's American Civil Rights Institute, which has sponsored similar measures in other states. Recent polling showed support for the initiative at 53 percent.

    -- Nebraska's Initiative 424, also sponsored by Connerly, would similarly end all affirmative action programs in the state and ban racial preferences in public employment and higher education.

    Marijuana

    -- Massachusetts' Question 2 would decriminalize marijuana and make possession of up to an ounce of the drug an infraction, with a $100 fine, rather than a misdemeanor. The initiative is not expected to pass. Only the medical use of marijuana has been approved by previous measures in other states.

    -- California's Proposition 5 would decriminalize marijuana and make possession of the drug an infraction instead of a misdemeanor. The measure also includes an overhaul of drug treatment programs and modifies sentencing and parole requirements for drug offenders.

    Age of Consent

    -- South Carolina's Amendment 1 would overturn a previously approved ballot initiative that set the age of consent for unmarried women at 14 years old. It would allow the state legislature to make the age of consent 16 again.

  2. #2032
    Originally posted by Houston:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">ike I said, mccain does not know that he is really a democrat.
    That's maybe why McCain ALMOST joined the Democrats in 2000 and Kerry considered him as his VP pick in 2004.

    But then, McCain changed to conform to the GOP ideology in order to get the party support. And the rest is history this country is writing as we speak. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I didn't know that - do you have the link handy (or do I have to google it)?
    Do all the good you can, in all the ways you can, as long as ever you can.

    --John Wesley

  3. #2033
    Google that, but I'm gonna try to post link of some sort for all here, it's old news. lol

    Here's the link to the VP story from 2004
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/nation/p...3-10-mccain-vp_x.htm

  4. #2034
    Originally posted by ProudUSC:
    Voters Decide on Divisive Social Issues Nationwide

    Hot-button issues like *** marriage, abortion and affirmative action will be on the ballot in 36 states.

    Tuesday, November 04, 2008

    Some of the nation's most polarizing social issues, including *** marriage and abortion, came to the fore Tuesday as voters in 36 states were deciding on a slew of ballot initiatives.

    Nationwide, 153 measures are on the docket, none so hotly contested as California's Proposition 8, which would outlaw *** marriage in the state. Opposing sides have raised $74 million in the ***-marriage battle, believed to be a record for such a campaign.

    Following is a list of the nation's biggest ballot initiatives.

    *** Marriage

    -- California's Proposition 8 would ban same-*** marriage in the state, which has seen thousands of such marriages since it was made legal in May. California voters outlawed *** marriage in 2000, but the state Supreme Court overturned the measure six months ago, saying it violated the state constitution. Proposition 8 would reverse that ruling and allow voters to amend their state constitution to ban *** marriage. The most recent poll by California's Field Research Corporation showed the measure to ban *** marriage was losing, 49-44 percent. But confusion could reign at the ballot box since a vote "yes" on the initiative would mean support for a ban and a vote "no" would be support for *** marriage.

    -- Arizona's Proposition 102 would define marriage as the union of a man and a woman; it had majority support in recent polling.

    -- Florida's Amendment 2, which would similarly define marriage as between a man and a woman, was leading in recent polling, but may not capture the 60 percent necessary to pass.

    Abortion

    -- Colorado's Amendment 48, which defines a "person" to include "any human being from the moment of fertilization," would ban abortion in the state. The initiative -- proposed by the anti-abortion group Colorado for Equal Rights -- is intended to provide fetuses with equal constitutional rights and would define abortion as an act of murder. It makes no exception for cases of rape or when the life of the mother is at risk. The measure is not expected to pass.

    -- South Dakota's Measure 11 would ban abortion but allow for exceptions in cases of rape, incest or when the life of the mother is at risk. South Dakota voters in 2006 overturned a state law that banned abortion but did not allow for those exceptions. Recent polling shows the measure's outcome is too close to call. It could trigger a Supreme Court case if it passes.

    Assisted Suicide

    -- Washington's I-1000 initiative would allow terminally ill patients to commit suicide with the help of a doctor. Polling shows the measure far ahead, 52-25 percent, according to the Initiative and Referendum Institute at the University of Southern California. Oregon is the only other state with a similar law.

    Racial Preferences

    -- Colorado's Amendment 46 would end all affirmative action programs in the state and ban racial preferences in public employment and higher education. The initiative was sponsored by Ward Connerly's American Civil Rights Institute, which has sponsored similar measures in other states. Recent polling showed support for the initiative at 53 percent.

    -- Nebraska's Initiative 424, also sponsored by Connerly, would similarly end all affirmative action programs in the state and ban racial preferences in public employment and higher education.

    Marijuana

    -- Massachusetts' Question 2 would decriminalize marijuana and make possession of up to an ounce of the drug an infraction, with a $100 fine, rather than a misdemeanor. The initiative is not expected to pass. Only the medical use of marijuana has been approved by previous measures in other states.

    -- California's Proposition 5 would decriminalize marijuana and make possession of the drug an infraction instead of a misdemeanor. The measure also includes an overhaul of drug treatment programs and modifies sentencing and parole requirements for drug offenders.

    Age of Consent

    -- South Carolina's Amendment 1 would overturn a previously approved ballot initiative that set the age of consent for unmarried women at 14 years old. It would allow the state legislature to make the age of consent 16 again.
    I really don't think voters will be interested in voting for a single issue when they are worried if they'll have a job next week. With the exception of a few states, most of them are solid majority states so it won't have much impact on anything.
    "What you see in the photograph isn't what you saw at the time. The real skill of photography is organized visual lying."

  5. #2035
    Originally posted by davdah:
    Sure we do. Many of those propositions are pork spending plans. The amounts in the billions are printed like its chump change. Most that include taxes, bonds, or any out of pocket will be road kill. The Prop 8 measure will become law soon enough here. Assuming the activist judges are taken out of the equation. Unless of course you want your children taken on a field trip to see a ***** wedding.
    November 4th 2008, Had A special Grilled New York strip and Delmonico Reserved!!!! Plus a Skewer Of The Most Delightful Shrimp!!!! For yourself and spouse!!!! I Saved It for as long As i Could!
    USC and Legal, Honest Immigrant Alike Must Fight Against Those That Deceive and Disrupt A Place Of Desirability! All Are Victims of Fraud, Both USC and Honest Immigrant Alike! The bad can and does make it more difficult for the good! Be careful who y

  6. #2036
    Ladies and gentlemen, the president-elect of the USA and his VP:



    Transcript.. "This is your victory" says Obama..


    Obama:

    Hello, Chicago.

    If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible, who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time, who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer.

    It's the answer told by lines that stretched around schools and churches in numbers this nation has never seen, by people who waited three hours and four hours, many for the first time in their lives, because they believed that this time must be different, that their voices could be that difference.

    It's the answer spoken by young and old, rich and poor, Democrat and Republican, black, white, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, g-ay, straight, disabled and not disabled. Americans who sent a message to the world that we have never been just a collection of individuals or a collection of red states and blue states.

    We are, and always will be, the United States of America.

    It's the answer that led those who've been told for so long by so many to be cynical and fearful and doubtful about what we can achieve to put their hands on the arc of history and bend it once more toward the hope of a better day.

    It's been a long time coming, but tonight, because of what we did on this date in this election at this defining moment change has come to America.

    A little bit earlier this evening, I received an extraordinarily gracious call from Sen. McCain.

    Sen. McCain fought long and hard in this campaign. And he's fought even longer and harder for the country that he loves. He has endured sacrifices for America that most of us cannot begin to imagine. We are better off for the service rendered by this brave and selfless leader.

    I congratulate him; I congratulate Gov. Palin for all that they've achieved. And I look forward to working with them to renew this nation's promise in the months ahead.

    I want to thank my partner in this journey, a man who campaigned from his heart, and spoke for the men and women he grew up with on the streets of Scranton and rode with on the train home to Delaware, the vice president-elect of the United States, Joe Biden.

    And I would not be standing here tonight without the unyielding support of my best friend for the last 16 years the rock of our family, the love of my life, the nation's next first lady Michelle Obama.

    Sasha and Malia I love you both more than you can imagine. And you have earned the new puppy that's coming with us to the new White House.

    And while she's no longer with us, I know my grandmother's watching, along with the family that made me who I am. I miss them tonight. I know that my debt to them is beyond measure.

    To my sister Maya, my sister Alma, all my other brothers and sisters, thank you so much for all the support that you've given me. I am grateful to them.

    And to my campaign manager, David Plouffe, the unsung hero of this campaign, who built the best -- the best political campaign, I think, in the history of the United States of America.

    To my chief strategist David Axelrod who's been a partner with me every step of the way.

    To the best campaign team ever assembled in the history of politics you made this happen, and I am forever grateful for what you've sacrificed to get it done.

    But above all, I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to. It belongs to you. It belongs to you.

    I was never the likeliest candidate for this office. We didn't start with much money or many endorsements. Our campaign was not hatched in the halls of Washington. It began in the backyards of Des Moines and the living rooms of Concord and the front porches of Charleston. It was built by working men and women who dug into what little savings they had to give $5 and $10 and $20 to the cause.

    It grew strength from the young people who rejected the myth of their generation's apathy who left their homes and their families for jobs that offered little pay and less sleep.

    It drew strength from the not-so-young people who braved the bitter cold and scorching heat to knock on doors of perfect strangers, and from the millions of Americans who volunteered and organized and proved that more than two centuries later a government of the people, by the people, and for the people has not perished from the Earth.

    This is your victory.

    And I know you didn't do this just to win an election. And I know you didn't do it for me.

    You did it because you understand the enormity of the task that lies ahead. For even as we celebrate tonight, we know the challenges that tomorrow will bring are the greatest of our lifetime -- two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century.

    Even as we stand here tonight, we know there are brave Americans waking up in the deserts of Iraq and the mountains of Afghanistan to risk their lives for us.

    There are mothers and fathers who will lie awake after the children fall asleep and wonder how they'll make the mortgage or pay their doctors' bills or save enough for their child's college education.

    There's new energy to harness, new jobs to be created, new schools to build, and threats to meet, alliances to repair.

    The road ahead will be long. Our climb will be steep. We may not get there in one year or even in one term. But, America, I have never been more hopeful than I am tonight that we will get there.

    I promise you, we as a people will get there.

    There will be setbacks and false starts. There are many who won't agree with every decision or policy I make as president. And we know the government can't solve every problem.

    But I will always be honest with you about the challenges we face. I will listen to you, especially when we disagree. And, above all, I will ask you to join in the work of remaking this nation, the only way it's been done in America for 221 years -- block by block, brick by brick, calloused hand by calloused hand.

    What began 21 months ago in the depths of winter cannot end on this autumn night.

    This victory alone is not the change we seek. It is only the chance for us to make that change. And that cannot happen if we go back to the way things were.

    It can't happen without you, without a new spirit of service, a new spirit of sacrifice.

    So let us summon a new spirit of patriotism, of responsibility, where each of us resolves to pitch in and work harder and look after not only ourselves but each other.

    Let us remember that, if this financial crisis taught us anything, it's that we cannot have a thriving Wall Street while Main Street suffers.

    In this country, we rise or fall as one nation, as one people. Let's resist the temptation to fall back on the same partisanship and pettiness and immaturity that has poisoned our politics for so long.

    Let's remember that it was a man from this state who first carried the banner of the Republican Party to the White House, a party founded on the values of self-reliance and individual liberty and national unity.

    Those are values that we all share. And while the Democratic Party has won a great victory tonight, we do so with a measure of humility and determination to heal the divides that have held back our progress.

    As Lincoln said to a nation far more divided than ours, we are not enemies but friends. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection.

    And to those Americans whose support I have yet to earn, I may not have won your vote tonight, but I hear your voices. I need your help. And I will be your president, too.

    And to all those watching tonight from beyond our shores, from parliaments and palaces, to those who are huddled around radios in the forgotten corners of the world, our stories are singular, but our destiny is shared, and a new dawn of American leadership is at hand.

    To those -- to those who would tear the world down: We will defeat you. To those who seek peace and security: We support you. And to all those who have wondered if America's beacon still burns as bright: Tonight we proved once more that the true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals: democracy, liberty, opportunity and unyielding hope.

    That's the true genius of America: that America can change. Our union can be perfected. What we've already achieved gives us hope for what we can and must achieve tomorrow.

    This election had many firsts and many stories that will be told for generations. But one that's on my mind tonight's about a woman who cast her ballot in Atlanta. She's a lot like the millions of others who stood in line to make their voice heard in this election except for one thing: Ann Nixon Cooper is 106 years old.

    She was born just a generation past slavery; a time when there were no cars on the road or planes in the sky; when someone like her couldn't vote for two reasons -- because she was a woman and because of the color of her skin.

    And tonight, I think about all that she's seen throughout her century in America -- the heartache and the hope; the struggle and the progress; the times we were told that we can't, and the people who pressed on with that American creed: Yes we can.

    At a time when women's voices were silenced and their hopes dismissed, she lived to see them stand up and speak out and reach for the ballot. Yes we can.

    When there was despair in the dust bowl and depression across the land, she saw a nation conquer fear itself with a New Deal, new jobs, a new sense of common purpose. Yes we can.

    When the bombs fell on our harbor and tyranny threatened the world, she was there to witness a generation rise to greatness and a democracy was saved. Yes we can.

    She was there for the buses in Montgomery, the hoses in Birmingham, a bridge in Selma, and a preacher from Atlanta who told a people that "We Shall Overcome." Yes we can.

    A man touched down on the moon, a wall came down in Berlin, a world was connected by our own science and imagination.

    And this year, in this election, she touched her finger to a screen, and cast her vote, because after 106 years in America, through the best of times and the darkest of hours, she knows how America can change.

    Yes we can.

    America, we have come so far. We have seen so much. But there is so much more to do. So tonight, let us ask ourselves -- if our children should live to see the next century; if my daughters should be so lucky to live as long as Ann Nixon Cooper, what change will they see? What progress will we have made?

    This is our chance to answer that call. This is our moment.


    This is our time, to put our people back to work and open doors of opportunity for our kids; to restore prosperity and promote the cause of peace; to reclaim the American dream and reaffirm that fundamental truth, that, out of many, we are one; that while we breathe, we hope. And where we are met with cynicism and doubts and those who tell us that we can't, we will respond with that timeless creed that sums up the spirit of a people: Yes, we can.

    Thank you. God bless you. And may God bless the United States of America.

    <span class="ev_code_PINK">Picture and transcript courtesy of the following links:

    http://discuss.ilw.com/eve/forums/a/.../m/64810344741

    http://discuss.ilw.com/eve/forums/a/.../m/82410115641


    </span>
    Do all the good you can, in all the ways you can, as long as ever you can.

    --John Wesley

  7. #2037
    When the next president is a woman, then the glass ceiling will truly be gone.

    Congratulations to Obama. I sincerely hope he lives up to America's and the worlds expectations. Congratulations too to John McCain for his dignity and grace in defeat. Many of us could learn a lesson from him and remember that there is also such a thing as a poor winner.

    To everyone here, I hope we can soon put this campaign behind us and get back to what we all hang around for. I realize that some friendships will never be the same, but we need to remember what it is this forum is really about and pull together to help those who come here for sound advice instead of continuing the vindictiveness, condescension and name-calling that's become so prevalent.
    **************************************
    The whole of life is but a moment of time. It is our duty, therefore to use it, not to misuse it - Plutarch

  8. #2038
    Aroha!
    Do all the good you can, in all the ways you can, as long as ever you can.

    --John Wesley

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