ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Naturalized ! Am I a joint citizen?

  1. #1
    OK now I am a proud US citizen, thanks to the advice from this board.

    I WAS a UK citizen, and of course during the citizenship ceremony I renounced allegiance to foreign princes and potentates etc.
    And I meant every word.

    Now, I have not told the United Kingdom about this development and I am not sure the US government has either. I still have my UK passport.
    Am I missing something? Or do I have dual citizenship?

    Thanks!
    Wolf. Right Here and Now

  2. #2
    OK now I am a proud US citizen, thanks to the advice from this board.

    I WAS a UK citizen, and of course during the citizenship ceremony I renounced allegiance to foreign princes and potentates etc.
    And I meant every word.

    Now, I have not told the United Kingdom about this development and I am not sure the US government has either. I still have my UK passport.
    Am I missing something? Or do I have dual citizenship?

    Thanks!
    Wolf. Right Here and Now

  3. #3
    Hi Wolf and congrats!

    You have dual citizenship now, you don't lose the British one. There is nothing for you to do.

    Just remember to take both passports with you if you do travel to UK. Usually people leave with US passport, enter with UK and vice versa. Sometimes they ask you to show both.

    Just remember also to renew you UK passport when it's due, if ever you need to prove your Citizenship in the UK as ID.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    God Bless America - God Bless Immigrants - God Bless Poor Misguided Souls Too

    National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    1.800.799.SAFE (7233) 1.800.787.

  4. #4
    Sprint: Given that WolfRhan is now an American citizen, and proud to be so...why should he need to renew his British passport? I agree that - technically - he has dual citizenship, but he can legally enter the U.K. using his American passport. Indeed, as an American citizen, he should always travel using his American passport...even when visiting his country of origin.

    If one is not proud to travel on an American passport, perhaps that person should reconsider their decision to apply for American citizenship...and, indeed, might even consider whether they might be happier living in another country.

  5. #5
    Congratulations, WolfRhan

    To clarify, although you do renounce allegiance during the oath ceremony, many countries don't accept that renunciation and the US doesn't enforce it, so you maintain citizenship.

    Some countries actually require that you enter on their passport, so you should check that before traveling back to the UK, or perhaps the other UKvians could answer to that.
    **************************************
    The whole of life is but a moment of time. It is our duty, therefore to use it, not to misuse it - Plutarch

  6. #6
    Wow great thanks for the help - it's good to know my status.

    Actually, SunDevilUSA I am PROUD to be a US citizen and I plan to use my US passport wherever possible, including to UK. If anyone asks me my nationality I tell them I am an American. In fact, even if they don't ask I usually volunteer the information I'm American, period.

    That said, United Kingdom is hardly at odds with USA and those guys have not been much trouble since the whole Boston Tea thing. In fact, they have been quite helpful on a few occasions. So there is not a real conflict of interest here I might as well just keep my UK passport, doesn't cost anything & doesn't expire until 2017.

    Right now I am trying to get China visa in my US passport and the Chinese are papering me to death. Ever since the Olympics they seem to have notched up the bureacracy. So, I could use my UK passport which has a perfectly good China visa in it & effectivly stick it to the man for messing with a US citizen. Kinda.
    Wolf. Right Here and Now

  7. #7
    The information given to you on this board is, as usual, incorrect. Only I provide correct answers. The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Each country has its own citizenship laws based on its own policy.Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. For example, a child born in a foreign country to U.S. citizen parents may be both a U.S. citizen and a citizen of the country of birth.

    A U.S. citizen may acquire foreign citizenship by marriage, or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth.U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship.

    Intent can be shown by the person's statements or conduct.The U.S. Government recognizes that dual nationality exists but does not encourage it as a matter of policy because of the problems it may cause. Claims of other countries on dual national U.S. citizens may conflict with U.S. law, and dual nationality may limit U.S. Government efforts to assist citizens abroad. The country where a dual national is located generally has a stronger claim to that person's allegiance.

    However, dual nationals owe allegiance to both the United States and the foreign country. They are required to obey the laws of both countries. Either country has the right to enforce its laws, particularly if the person later travels there.Most U.S. citizens, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. Dual nationals may also be required by the foreign country to use its passport to enter and leave that country. Use of the foreign passport does not endanger U.S. citizenship.Most countries permit a person to renounce or otherwise lose citizenship.

    Information on losing foreign citizenship can be obtained from the foreign country's embassy and consulates in the United States. Americans can renounce U.S. citizenship in the proper form at U.S. embassies and consulates abroad.

  8. #8
    The OP was asking about the UK and US Citizenship, I therefore gave the correct information.

    He was not asking about any other Citizenship, otherwise it would be a different answer as some you do lose Citizenship of the other Country.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    God Bless America - God Bless Immigrants - God Bless Poor Misguided Souls Too

    National Domestic Violence Hotline:
    1.800.799.SAFE (7233) 1.800.787.

  9. #9
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Sprint_girl07:
    The OP was asking about the UK and US Citizenship, I therefore gave the correct information.
    He was not asking about any other Citizenship, otherwise it would be a different answer as some you do lose Citizenship of the other Country. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Get out of my country !!!! Freaking animal !!!

  10. #10

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-04-2009, 10:22 AM
  2. Question if you're the disabled son of a naturalized US citizen...
    By lili12345 in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-01-2008, 07:34 AM
  3. traveling to Mexico US Citizen - Naturalized
    By ces_q in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-10-2007, 04:30 PM
  4. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-25-2004, 10:33 AM
  5. TN visa interview for naturalized canadian citizen
    By in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-05-2003, 03:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: