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Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Allan Wall, the anti-immigration Vdare.com writer lives... in Mexico.

  1. #1
    And he's been living there, and writing his anti-immigration to the USA articles from there since 1991...

    http://www.vdare.com/awall/071030_memo.htm

    Since he's married to a Mexican national, I suppose he's not there living and/or working illegally, like most of our American fellows...

    These are small numbers because that's a small town, but you'd be surprised if you checked the numbers of Americans living and working in the State of Baja California.

    "...There's also the matter of establishing and maintaining legal residency. Mexican consulate spokesman Cesar Romero of Chicago acknowledged that many Americans live illegally in Mexico by not obtaining or letting lapse the retiree visa, which must renewed annually. But Romero could provide no figure. "I hear it's a very common practice," he said. "It's a problem there..." ((http://www.realestateblogg.com/node/...2600a86b0454f5)



    Of course, they're not illegal aliens, they're just undocumented immigrants.


    http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...nmiguel26.html

    Mexican city addresses its American problem
    By Nathaniel Hoffman

    Knight Ridder Newspapers
    BARBARA SHEA / NEWSDAY

    Mexico a contradiction on handling migrants

    SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE, Mexico " On a Thanksgiving visit in 1997, Deb Turpin fell in love with San Miguel de Allende, with its cobblestone streets and colonial architecture, and invested in two vacation rentals, Casa del Sol and Casa Vista. She rents out the houses " with cook and maid " on the Internet.

    Turpin, who lives in Kansas City, Mo., is one of thousands of North Americans doing business or living in Mexico without the proper documentation. The number of foreigners running underground businesses in tourist areas is a growing concern for local officials because they often skirt paying fees and taxes.

    "It's not that we do not want them doing business," said Christopher Finkelstein Franyuti, San Miguel de Allende's coordinator of international relations. "We want them doing business but paying the duties."

    In San Miguel, a midsize city on a hillside in central Mexico, 18th-century colonial houses crowd narrow streets around a town square and a towering church with a Gothic tower. The vistas are tranquil, and the cost of living is low. The town has attracted U.S. retirees and artists for some 50 years, but in the past decade a younger crowd has discovered it.

    Foreign architects, musicians, engineers, accountants and others work in the town without permits, Finkelstein said. "They know that they are not paying taxes, and that is why they don't advertise exactly."

    He's estimated that unlicensed business in the city costs the local government 4 million pesos " more than $360,000 " a year in lost taxes and fees.

    Finkelstein recently discovered some 600 San Miguel rental properties on the Internet, all displaying U.S. or other international phone numbers.

    The city used pictures of properties on the Internet to identify the owners of about 100 rentals and gave the information to Mexican immigration, tax, utility and social-security officials. The agencies didn't do much, except levy a few fines against rental property owners who didn't pay into their local workers' social-security accounts, Finkelstein said.

    Turpin said she'd heard tourist destinations all over the world were starting to find ways to rein in Internet-based vacation-rental businesses, and she was willing to fork over local taxes when Hacienda, the Mexican IRS, came knocking. "We have a nice little gig ... and I don't want to do anything to mess it up."

    According to 2000 Mexican census data, 1,345 Americans are living in San Miguel de Allende, but locals put the number at 10,000 to 25,000 in the high season.

    Undocumented Americans occasionally are caught working in restaurants, bars and clothing shops in San Miguel and can be kicked out of the country, but the numbers are low. Mexico deported nearly 1,000 Americans last year, according to data from the National Migration Institute, the federal immigration agency. The United States sends 10 times as many Mexicans home every month.

    More than 5 million Americans visited Mexico's interior in 2005, and most were granted automatic six-month stays.

    Mexican immigration agents aren't interested in going after tourists who overstay their visa or retirees who forgot to fill out the proper forms, said Hipolito Trevino Lecea, commissioner of the National Migration Institute.

    Trevino said undocumented residents on both sides of the border were basically an administrative problem, not a criminal problem. Americans who are targeted for deportation probably were involved in some criminal activity, he said.

    "The fundamental difference in economic terms is, in general, when a North American comes to Mexico to live he is making an investment," the Harvard-educated economist said.

    In San Miguel, the hottest investments are in real estate.

    Julio Olvera, a University of Texas graduate, is the only Mexican agent at a U.S.-owned real-estate office. He said he lived illegally in the United States for 13 years and didn't mind undocumented Americans in town as long as they tried to speak some Spanish and weren't serial killers.

    "Mexican society," he said, "is very welcoming."

    Copyright 2006 The Seattle Times Company

  2. #2
    And he's been living there, and writing his anti-immigration to the USA articles from there since 1991...

    http://www.vdare.com/awall/071030_memo.htm

    Since he's married to a Mexican national, I suppose he's not there living and/or working illegally, like most of our American fellows...

    These are small numbers because that's a small town, but you'd be surprised if you checked the numbers of Americans living and working in the State of Baja California.

    "...There's also the matter of establishing and maintaining legal residency. Mexican consulate spokesman Cesar Romero of Chicago acknowledged that many Americans live illegally in Mexico by not obtaining or letting lapse the retiree visa, which must renewed annually. But Romero could provide no figure. "I hear it's a very common practice," he said. "It's a problem there..." ((http://www.realestateblogg.com/node/...2600a86b0454f5)



    Of course, they're not illegal aliens, they're just undocumented immigrants.


    http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...nmiguel26.html

    Mexican city addresses its American problem
    By Nathaniel Hoffman

    Knight Ridder Newspapers
    BARBARA SHEA / NEWSDAY

    Mexico a contradiction on handling migrants

    SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE, Mexico " On a Thanksgiving visit in 1997, Deb Turpin fell in love with San Miguel de Allende, with its cobblestone streets and colonial architecture, and invested in two vacation rentals, Casa del Sol and Casa Vista. She rents out the houses " with cook and maid " on the Internet.

    Turpin, who lives in Kansas City, Mo., is one of thousands of North Americans doing business or living in Mexico without the proper documentation. The number of foreigners running underground businesses in tourist areas is a growing concern for local officials because they often skirt paying fees and taxes.

    "It's not that we do not want them doing business," said Christopher Finkelstein Franyuti, San Miguel de Allende's coordinator of international relations. "We want them doing business but paying the duties."

    In San Miguel, a midsize city on a hillside in central Mexico, 18th-century colonial houses crowd narrow streets around a town square and a towering church with a Gothic tower. The vistas are tranquil, and the cost of living is low. The town has attracted U.S. retirees and artists for some 50 years, but in the past decade a younger crowd has discovered it.

    Foreign architects, musicians, engineers, accountants and others work in the town without permits, Finkelstein said. "They know that they are not paying taxes, and that is why they don't advertise exactly."

    He's estimated that unlicensed business in the city costs the local government 4 million pesos " more than $360,000 " a year in lost taxes and fees.

    Finkelstein recently discovered some 600 San Miguel rental properties on the Internet, all displaying U.S. or other international phone numbers.

    The city used pictures of properties on the Internet to identify the owners of about 100 rentals and gave the information to Mexican immigration, tax, utility and social-security officials. The agencies didn't do much, except levy a few fines against rental property owners who didn't pay into their local workers' social-security accounts, Finkelstein said.

    Turpin said she'd heard tourist destinations all over the world were starting to find ways to rein in Internet-based vacation-rental businesses, and she was willing to fork over local taxes when Hacienda, the Mexican IRS, came knocking. "We have a nice little gig ... and I don't want to do anything to mess it up."

    According to 2000 Mexican census data, 1,345 Americans are living in San Miguel de Allende, but locals put the number at 10,000 to 25,000 in the high season.

    Undocumented Americans occasionally are caught working in restaurants, bars and clothing shops in San Miguel and can be kicked out of the country, but the numbers are low. Mexico deported nearly 1,000 Americans last year, according to data from the National Migration Institute, the federal immigration agency. The United States sends 10 times as many Mexicans home every month.

    More than 5 million Americans visited Mexico's interior in 2005, and most were granted automatic six-month stays.

    Mexican immigration agents aren't interested in going after tourists who overstay their visa or retirees who forgot to fill out the proper forms, said Hipolito Trevino Lecea, commissioner of the National Migration Institute.

    Trevino said undocumented residents on both sides of the border were basically an administrative problem, not a criminal problem. Americans who are targeted for deportation probably were involved in some criminal activity, he said.

    "The fundamental difference in economic terms is, in general, when a North American comes to Mexico to live he is making an investment," the Harvard-educated economist said.

    In San Miguel, the hottest investments are in real estate.

    Julio Olvera, a University of Texas graduate, is the only Mexican agent at a U.S.-owned real-estate office. He said he lived illegally in the United States for 13 years and didn't mind undocumented Americans in town as long as they tried to speak some Spanish and weren't serial killers.

    "Mexican society," he said, "is very welcoming."

    Copyright 2006 The Seattle Times Company

  3. #3
    Are some immigrants arrogant when they don't want to assimilate into our society and our culture? I definitely think they are.

    Would we Americans do the same in their countries? We do:

    "...I actually received email from a guy from San Miguel de Allende who said that if there are any Mexicans in "his" town that don't like the fact that their existence is to serve the Americans, they can just leave the town..."

    "...Most do not learn the local language and reside and socialize within an isolated cultural enclave. These immigrants practice their own cultural traditions and celebrate their national holidays. Grocery stores are stocked with locally-unfamiliar products that hail from their homeland..."

    http://ezinearticles.com/?Want-to-Retire-or-Work-in-Mex...Read-This!&id=812608

    Let's at least be honest and admit that we, as immigrants, do the same in other countries that we constantly criticize about immigrants in our own country...

  4. #4
    Why is this post at the top again? Strange...

  5. #5

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