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Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Truth About Mail Order Brides !!!

  1. #1
    First Ever Wide-Scale Survey on Cross-Cultural (Mail Order Bride) Marriage and Divorce
    Controversies of various sorts have plagued those rare souls who decide to cast a wider net in the search for their marriage partners, and are open to finding partners from other countries. Between accusations of "Mail Order Brides" and "*** trafficking," this topic has been a lightning rod for politicians and lawyers alike. Misinformation - including Congressional testimony - abounds. This survey, commissioned by an independent voice, International Relations, addresses many of the myths and much of the hyperbole surrounding this difficult and highly charged topic.

    Englewood, Colorado (PRWEB) January 28, 2009 -- International Relations recently completed the first-ever wide-scale study to collect facts and statistics dealing with cross-cultural marriage and divorce. The survey was initiated in Summer of 2008 with an awareness campaign to more than 250,000 persons who were thought to qualify to complete the survey. Additionally, there was a press release in mid-July 2008 asking for qualified registrants to complete the survey and intending to appeal to the broadest possible audience.

    Between July and October of 2008, nearly 3,000 people registered to take the survey. Of the responses received, some were later discovered to be incomplete or invalid, and the final tally of valid responses was more than 1,700. This dataset was evaluated by an independent expert in the field of statistical analysis, Dr. James Lani of Statistics Solutions, Inc., and he said; "Upon receipt of the data from International Relations in early October 2008, Statistics Solutions, Inc. performed an integrity check to insure the resultant data were valid for analyses. The raw data contained more than 2,300 individual responses. Following Statistics Solutions review of the raw data, nearly 600 responses were excluded from the dataset, resulting in a validated dataset of more than 1,700 survey responses."

    Included in the report from Statistics Solutions, Inc, is presentation of the following:


    Demographic Analysis of Survey Respondents
    Gender and Length of Courtship Before Marriage
    Gender and Household Income
    Gender and Level of Education
    The data, not surprisingly, indicates that both men and women involved in a cross-cultural marriage tend to be highly educated and hold at least a Bachelors Degree.

    It also indicates that the vast majority of cross-cultural marriages have household incomes less than $100,000 per year. Of course, some consideration must be made for the fact the data included responses from many different countries, some with a cost of living, and attendant income levels, substantially lower than in the United States or Canada.

    Statistics Solutions, Inc. also examined the divorce rate among respondents, and compared it to the domestic U.S. divorce rate.

    Divorce rate among cross-cultural marriages was determined to be 40.76 percent, as contrasted to the domestic U.S. divorce rate of 48.0 percent.

    While the divorce rate remains significant at 40.76 percent, it is also clearly better than the rate experienced by U.S. couples.

    Other findings from the survey data included results about:


    Length of marriages that divorced
    Primary causes of divorce
    Average ages of men and women when married
    Average age gaps in cross-cultural marriages
    Perhaps the most significant of all was the response to the question about whether respondents would be willing to try another cross-cultural marriage if their current/previous marriage would (or did) fail. Resoundingly, almost 90 percent of respondents answered they would be willing to try again.

    Numerous other statistics were considered by Statistics Solutions, Inc. and future use of the data was addressed. Dr. Lani concluded his report with the following statement; "The data collected by International Relations provides opportunities for numerous additional statistical studies. Statistics Solutions, Inc. has provided analyses on only a few of the myriad studies that might be performed with the survey data. Statistics Solutions, Inc. finds the methodology employed by International Relations to have met professional standards and providing valid results. Further use of the survey data for providing additional insight into cross-cultural marriage and divorce is encouraged."

    The full report by Statistics Solutions, Inc. may be found at this URL -- http://www.GoodWife.com/survey_report.pdf.

    Results of this survey are being actively examined in discussion forums at Russian Women Discussion.com (http://www.RussianWomenDiscussion.com), and Planet Love (http://www.Planet-Love.com).

  2. #2
    First Ever Wide-Scale Survey on Cross-Cultural (Mail Order Bride) Marriage and Divorce
    Controversies of various sorts have plagued those rare souls who decide to cast a wider net in the search for their marriage partners, and are open to finding partners from other countries. Between accusations of "Mail Order Brides" and "*** trafficking," this topic has been a lightning rod for politicians and lawyers alike. Misinformation - including Congressional testimony - abounds. This survey, commissioned by an independent voice, International Relations, addresses many of the myths and much of the hyperbole surrounding this difficult and highly charged topic.

    Englewood, Colorado (PRWEB) January 28, 2009 -- International Relations recently completed the first-ever wide-scale study to collect facts and statistics dealing with cross-cultural marriage and divorce. The survey was initiated in Summer of 2008 with an awareness campaign to more than 250,000 persons who were thought to qualify to complete the survey. Additionally, there was a press release in mid-July 2008 asking for qualified registrants to complete the survey and intending to appeal to the broadest possible audience.

    Between July and October of 2008, nearly 3,000 people registered to take the survey. Of the responses received, some were later discovered to be incomplete or invalid, and the final tally of valid responses was more than 1,700. This dataset was evaluated by an independent expert in the field of statistical analysis, Dr. James Lani of Statistics Solutions, Inc., and he said; "Upon receipt of the data from International Relations in early October 2008, Statistics Solutions, Inc. performed an integrity check to insure the resultant data were valid for analyses. The raw data contained more than 2,300 individual responses. Following Statistics Solutions review of the raw data, nearly 600 responses were excluded from the dataset, resulting in a validated dataset of more than 1,700 survey responses."

    Included in the report from Statistics Solutions, Inc, is presentation of the following:


    Demographic Analysis of Survey Respondents
    Gender and Length of Courtship Before Marriage
    Gender and Household Income
    Gender and Level of Education
    The data, not surprisingly, indicates that both men and women involved in a cross-cultural marriage tend to be highly educated and hold at least a Bachelors Degree.

    It also indicates that the vast majority of cross-cultural marriages have household incomes less than $100,000 per year. Of course, some consideration must be made for the fact the data included responses from many different countries, some with a cost of living, and attendant income levels, substantially lower than in the United States or Canada.

    Statistics Solutions, Inc. also examined the divorce rate among respondents, and compared it to the domestic U.S. divorce rate.

    Divorce rate among cross-cultural marriages was determined to be 40.76 percent, as contrasted to the domestic U.S. divorce rate of 48.0 percent.

    While the divorce rate remains significant at 40.76 percent, it is also clearly better than the rate experienced by U.S. couples.

    Other findings from the survey data included results about:


    Length of marriages that divorced
    Primary causes of divorce
    Average ages of men and women when married
    Average age gaps in cross-cultural marriages
    Perhaps the most significant of all was the response to the question about whether respondents would be willing to try another cross-cultural marriage if their current/previous marriage would (or did) fail. Resoundingly, almost 90 percent of respondents answered they would be willing to try again.

    Numerous other statistics were considered by Statistics Solutions, Inc. and future use of the data was addressed. Dr. Lani concluded his report with the following statement; "The data collected by International Relations provides opportunities for numerous additional statistical studies. Statistics Solutions, Inc. has provided analyses on only a few of the myriad studies that might be performed with the survey data. Statistics Solutions, Inc. finds the methodology employed by International Relations to have met professional standards and providing valid results. Further use of the survey data for providing additional insight into cross-cultural marriage and divorce is encouraged."

    The full report by Statistics Solutions, Inc. may be found at this URL -- http://www.GoodWife.com/survey_report.pdf.

    Results of this survey are being actively examined in discussion forums at Russian Women Discussion.com (http://www.RussianWomenDiscussion.com), and Planet Love (http://www.Planet-Love.com).

  3. #3
    That's funny. Were only 1,700 respondents evaluated that were American's married to American's? Further, they may have stayed for the same reason's I did fear, love, and thinking it was best for the children. But thanks for the information. Not all people are bad, they come in all nationalities, shapes, color, and sizes. World is full of bad people and some are actually still good too!

  4. #4
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">divorce </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Even after Divorce, the Marriage-Based Applicant Eligible for I-485 Approval

    The Court's opinion in Choin v. Mukasey reflects the important lessons that an agency decision can be overturned by a higher court and that challenging a negative decision can result in a favorable ruling. However, one of the reasons that the Federal Court was able to use its interpretation of the law is that the BIA decision was not particularly detailed and, thus, it was not given deference that might otherwise have been given to a lower court's interpretation of the law.
    Generally, under immigration law, it is risky for a person to assume that s/he can obtain any immigration benefit based upon a family relationship, if the family relationship no longer exists.

    On August 12, 2008, in Choin v. Mukasey, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ordered the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) to consider Yelena Choin's Form I-485 Application for Adjustment of Status based upon marriage, even though she was no longer married to her U.S.-citizen husband. Generally, a foreign national spouse who is filing for permanent residence based upon marriage to a U.S. citizen must still be married at the time of the green card approval.

    The Court found an exception to this for spouses who enter the U.S. on the K-1 fiancé/e visa. This interpretation is limited to a K-1 fiancé/e of a U.S. citizen. There is a specific section of law that addresses the adjustment of status of K-1s and it is the wording of that section that led to the conclusion reached by the Court.

    The Choin case involved a woman who originally entered the United States lawfully on a K-1 fiancée visa and married her U.S. citizen sponsor. As readers of MurthyDotCom and the MurthyBulletin may recall from our Overview: K Visas for Fiancé/es and Spouses of USCs, the law provides that a foreign national engaged to a U.S. citizen can enter the United States in K-1 status for 90 days, within which time the couple is to marry. Based on that marriage, the foreign national spouse is eligible to file the I-485 to become a lawful permanent resident (LPR), commonly referred to as a green card holder. This is exactly what occurred in this case.

    http://www.greencardfamily.com...08/news2008_1104.htm

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