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Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: 13 Days of Glory

  1. #1
    Today, we celebrate the 173rd anniversary of the Fall of the Alamo. ANd still there is controversy about the battle as there was when the battle ended a long time ago.

    By Scott Huddleston - Express-News

    On the 173rd anniversary of the famous battle that helped win Texas independence, many are struggling to find a better way to remember the Alamo.

    Along with somber remembrances, today's activities include a silent protest in opposition to businesses that some say create a carnival atmosphere that cheapens the very ground where men on both sides lost their lives.

    The Alamo Society, an international group of about 400 professional and amateur historians, also wants part of the Alamo restored to its 1836 appearance.

    “A lot of people come to the Alamo and say ‘Is that all there is?' It's true, that is all there is, and we'd like to see more,” said Glenn Effler, an Air Force retiree from Denver and member of the group.

    About 15 years ago, a local panel studied the idea of replicating the 1836 compound, a former Spanish mission. It crafted a plan to raze six buildings on the west side of the plaza and erect 1830s-style stone walls at a cost of $40 million. But there were too many questions about the compound's actual makeup to ensure authenticity.

    Part of the answer to those questions may lie just north of today's Alamo grounds, at the History Shop at 713 E. Houston St.

    A 15-by-13-foot diorama, purchased and brought to San Antonio by singer Phil Collins, is said to be one of the most well researched Alamo models anywhere.

    It shows features of the fortified mission in great detail, from the roofless Alamo chapel — which 2.5 million people pass through annually — down to a row of latrines in the north courtyard.

    For $1 per person, visitors can see the diorama. A 13-minute sound and light show carries them through the highlights of the bloody predawn battle. Nearly 200 Alamo defenders died, and about 600 Mexican troops were killed or wounded.

    Collins said he paid “six figures” to buy the diorama from war artist Mark Lemon and have it moved here from Atlanta.

    “It's one of those things you can't really put a price on,” Collins said. “It was made for all the right reasons.”

    Bill Chemerka, who lives in Barnegat, N.J., and founded the Alamo Society in 1986, said Lemon's research could be used to replicate the 1836 Alamo.

    Although the old federal courthouse covers ground where the north wall stood, he said a project to close traffic and raze the commercial buildings facing the front of the Shrine would “pay off” historically and educationally, and “generate more money for San Antonio.”

    Chemerka said he'd like to see the businesses move to other sites downtown out of respect for the former battleground. Ripley's Haunted Adventure, where a ghoulish character named Stumpy coaxes visitors, lies near the spot where Alamo commander William Barret Travis wrote his famous letter “To the People of Texas and All Americans in the World," he said.

    “It's now at the epicenter of the disgrace,” Chemerka said. “I wouldn't want a McDonald's at Pearl Harbor or a Starbucks on the beaches of Normandy.”

    Misuse of the Alamo has been an issue since the U.S. Army began using the Shrine of Texas Liberty as a quartermaster depot in the 1850s. The Long Barracks, the only other original structure still standing, was part of a grocery store in the late 1800s.

    According to local historian Frank W. Jennings, humorist Will Rogers lamented during a 1926 visit here that there was “a filling station in connection with the Alamo.''

    That history of commercial presence in the city-owned plaza in front of the state-owned Alamo grounds is one reason Ripley's plans to stay put. Unlike Gettysburg, the Little Bighorn and other U.S. battlefields, the Alamo had a downtown area grow around it.

    “Alamo Plaza has developed over the years as the center of the city,” said Davis Phillips, president and general manager of Phillips Entertainment, which runs Ripley's Haunted Adventure and three other attractions in the plaza.

    Phillips said he and his partners invested $8 million, converting dilapidated buildings into businesses that attract about 525,000 visitors annually.

    “All the businesses here have a right to exist and have followed every law required to do so,” Phillips said.

    Marcie Ince, president of the San Antonio Conservation Society, said the storefronts are historic themselves.

    “While we may not like the T-shirt shops located in the buildings, these buildings are part of our history and we should not demolish them,” Ince said. “To create an artificial ‘Disneyfied' environment would be in conflict with the Conservation Society's mission.

    “Perhaps rethinking the shops into more appropriate uses should be part of the discussion,” Ince added.

    That discussion could begin at the first community workshop on the city's strategic historic preservation plan, set for 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the city's Development Services Building, 1901 S. Alamo St.

    A steering committee is crafting a plan that addresses all areas of preservation, including issues that affect tourism, said Shanon Wasielewski, the city's historic preservation officer.

    “A lot of what San Antonio has to offer is in the arena of heritage tourism,” she said. “Heritage tourists stay longer and spend more money. Part of this process is finding the right balance for San Antonio.”
    Source

    The Alamo through the seasons
    "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

  2. #2
    Today, we celebrate the 173rd anniversary of the Fall of the Alamo. ANd still there is controversy about the battle as there was when the battle ended a long time ago.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> By Scott Huddleston - Express-News

    On the 173rd anniversary of the famous battle that helped win Texas independence, many are struggling to find a better way to remember the Alamo.

    Along with somber remembrances, today's activities include a silent protest in opposition to businesses that some say create a carnival atmosphere that cheapens the very ground where men on both sides lost their lives.

    The Alamo Society, an international group of about 400 professional and amateur historians, also wants part of the Alamo restored to its 1836 appearance.

    “A lot of people come to the Alamo and say ‘Is that all there is?' It's true, that is all there is, and we'd like to see more,” said Glenn Effler, an Air Force retiree from Denver and member of the group.

    About 15 years ago, a local panel studied the idea of replicating the 1836 compound, a former Spanish mission. It crafted a plan to raze six buildings on the west side of the plaza and erect 1830s-style stone walls at a cost of $40 million. But there were too many questions about the compound's actual makeup to ensure authenticity.

    Part of the answer to those questions may lie just north of today's Alamo grounds, at the History Shop at 713 E. Houston St.

    A 15-by-13-foot diorama, purchased and brought to San Antonio by singer Phil Collins, is said to be one of the most well researched Alamo models anywhere.

    It shows features of the fortified mission in great detail, from the roofless Alamo chapel — which 2.5 million people pass through annually — down to a row of latrines in the north courtyard.

    For $1 per person, visitors can see the diorama. A 13-minute sound and light show carries them through the highlights of the bloody predawn battle. Nearly 200 Alamo defenders died, and about 600 Mexican troops were killed or wounded.

    Collins said he paid “six figures” to buy the diorama from war artist Mark Lemon and have it moved here from Atlanta.

    “It's one of those things you can't really put a price on,” Collins said. “It was made for all the right reasons.”

    Bill Chemerka, who lives in Barnegat, N.J., and founded the Alamo Society in 1986, said Lemon's research could be used to replicate the 1836 Alamo.

    Although the old federal courthouse covers ground where the north wall stood, he said a project to close traffic and raze the commercial buildings facing the front of the Shrine would “pay off” historically and educationally, and “generate more money for San Antonio.”

    Chemerka said he'd like to see the businesses move to other sites downtown out of respect for the former battleground. Ripley's Haunted Adventure, where a ghoulish character named Stumpy coaxes visitors, lies near the spot where Alamo commander William Barret Travis wrote his famous letter “To the People of Texas and All Americans in the World," he said.

    “It's now at the epicenter of the disgrace,” Chemerka said. “I wouldn't want a McDonald's at Pearl Harbor or a Starbucks on the beaches of Normandy.”

    Misuse of the Alamo has been an issue since the U.S. Army began using the Shrine of Texas Liberty as a quartermaster depot in the 1850s. The Long Barracks, the only other original structure still standing, was part of a grocery store in the late 1800s.

    According to local historian Frank W. Jennings, humorist Will Rogers lamented during a 1926 visit here that there was “a filling station in connection with the Alamo.''

    That history of commercial presence in the city-owned plaza in front of the state-owned Alamo grounds is one reason Ripley's plans to stay put. Unlike Gettysburg, the Little Bighorn and other U.S. battlefields, the Alamo had a downtown area grow around it.

    “Alamo Plaza has developed over the years as the center of the city,” said Davis Phillips, president and general manager of Phillips Entertainment, which runs Ripley's Haunted Adventure and three other attractions in the plaza.

    Phillips said he and his partners invested $8 million, converting dilapidated buildings into businesses that attract about 525,000 visitors annually.

    “All the businesses here have a right to exist and have followed every law required to do so,” Phillips said.

    Marcie Ince, president of the San Antonio Conservation Society, said the storefronts are historic themselves.

    “While we may not like the T-shirt shops located in the buildings, these buildings are part of our history and we should not demolish them,” Ince said. “To create an artificial ‘Disneyfied' environment would be in conflict with the Conservation Society's mission.

    “Perhaps rethinking the shops into more appropriate uses should be part of the discussion,” Ince added.

    That discussion could begin at the first community workshop on the city's strategic historic preservation plan, set for 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the city's Development Services Building, 1901 S. Alamo St.

    A steering committee is crafting a plan that addresses all areas of preservation, including issues that affect tourism, said Shanon Wasielewski, the city's historic preservation officer.

    “A lot of what San Antonio has to offer is in the arena of heritage tourism,” she said. “Heritage tourists stay longer and spend more money. Part of this process is finding the right balance for San Antonio.”
    </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Source

    The Alamo through the seasons
    "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

  3. #3

  4. #4
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by davdah:
    Was part of my own thoughts the first time I saw it. That's it? In one sense it would be nice to restore the entire compound. Only problem is location. Too many other buildings in the way. The t-shirt and novelty shops should be moved outside the historic buildings though. Kind of cheapens the moment.

    There sure are a lot of opinions as to what happened during the battle. And many given with great enthusiasm, LOL. People claiming they have access to some secret info that sheds light on suspected truths and such. Perhaps that is part of the draw. The mystery of events. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    My husband and son visited San Antonio last year and I asked them about the Alamo. They told me it was no big deal - nothing to it. Guess they need to make some modifications to signify the importance of the event.

  5. #5
    Where is Davy, Travis, and Bowie when you need them?

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