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Thread: "HOUSE REPUBLICAN EXPECTED TO YIELD TO SENATE"

  1. #1
    This article is for the antifascists of the world who still claims that house republicans(which is about a group of 50 GOP out of 230 republicans, will murder the president's chance of getting a well deserved victory on immigration, and lets not forget that the president is A GOP, NOT A DEMOCRATS...Ive always said that because the president is a republican, there is no way the party will allow 50 members to speak for the entire republican base and disrespect the president..Its one thing when you get shut out by democrats, but its very mind boggling to get slap by a small angry group in your party.

    --------------------------------------


    House GOP expected to yield on legislation
    By Stephen Dinan
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES
    May 26, 2006


    The House is the only obstacle that stands between President Bush and a comprehensive immigration bill, and the White House yesterday predicted that the chamber's Republicans will give in.
    White House press secretary Tony Snow said House Republicans will want to pass border security badly enough to back down from the fight against what many consider amnesty for illegal aliens, knowing there is a "heavier political price for failing to act, than for acting."
    "If you are a Republican member of Congress and you're concerned about illegal immigration, do you really want to say to your constituents: You know, I'm going to wait a couple of years before I take up the issue of people knowingly hiring illegal aliens, I want to wait a couple of years before I go ahead and try to identify who the illegal aliens are, I want to wait a couple of years before I start grappling with what to do with these 11 or 12 million people who are here illegally," Mr. Snow said.
    A president always has the most influence in the backroom House-Senate negotiations, but yesterday, Mr. Snow wouldn't tip the administration's hand when asked how they would approach the conference committee.
    "At this point, let's get a bill through the Senate, let's figure out where the fault lines are," he said.
    But those fault lines between the House and Senate are fairly public, deep and fundamental.
    The House passed a bill in December that stepped up border enforcement and interior enforcement, enabled local law enforcement in border areas to help enforce immigration laws and cracked down on employers who hired illegal aliens.
    The Senate included some of those measures but put far more emphasis on future foreign workers and a pathway to citizenship for the current estimated 10 million to 12 million illegal aliens, a move House Republicans consider an unacceptable amnesty.
    "If both parties in a negotiation are running the other way, they will never meet in any middle," said Don Stewart, spokesman for Sen. John Cornyn, Texas Republican.
    "The question for the House is some agreement to do more than just border security. The question for the Senate is: Are they willing to be less generous than the Senate bill? Without a yes on both of those two questions, there's no point in the conference going forward."
    From the House side, Majority Leader John A. Boehner acknowledged there were "two very separate and distinct directions that we're going," but said he still thinks they can reach an agreement with the Senate.
    Still, the Ohio Republican said, the House position is clear.

    "You can't control the problem without first strengthening the borders and beginning to enforce the laws," said Mr. Boehner.
    Mr. Bush last week called the Senate measure "a good immigration bill." He also recently reversed his administration's earlier position and now endorses the idea of a path to citizenship for some illegal aliens.
    He said any final bill must include border security, employer sanctions, a temporary-worker program and a way to handle the current illegal alien population.
    Rep. Jack Kingston, Georgia Republican, said the House has some areas in common with the Senate, including provisions to build more fencing -- 370 miles in the Senate version and 698 miles in the House version.
    Mr. Kingston said House Republicans are willing to accept a temporary-worker program for future workers but, in exchange, would have to win agreement on delaying it until the borders are secure and adopting some sort of biometric identification card.
    "We think probably we might be able to do something on a temporary visa basis, but where we will have a line in the sand is on the pathway to citizenship, because pathway to citizenship, by almost any angle, leads to somebody's definition of amnesty," he said. "We don't want 'Republican' and 'amnesty' in the same sentence."
    He estimated that there are 180 members of the House "just adamant about no amnesty."
    Although Mr. Bush has generally favored the Senate's approach and has recently said some illegal aliens can gain citizenship, he has been insistent that future foreign workers not have a path to citizenship. That sets up a major conflict with the Senate, where the bill that passed yesterday does grant that right to future workers.
    Mr. Bush did win an unlikely ally in former President Jimmy Carter, a Democrat, who this week said Mr. Bush's efforts to create a right to citizenship have been "quite admirable."

  2. #2
    This article is for the antifascists of the world who still claims that house republicans(which is about a group of 50 GOP out of 230 republicans, will murder the president's chance of getting a well deserved victory on immigration, and lets not forget that the president is A GOP, NOT A DEMOCRATS...Ive always said that because the president is a republican, there is no way the party will allow 50 members to speak for the entire republican base and disrespect the president..Its one thing when you get shut out by democrats, but its very mind boggling to get slap by a small angry group in your party.

    --------------------------------------


    House GOP expected to yield on legislation
    By Stephen Dinan
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES
    May 26, 2006


    The House is the only obstacle that stands between President Bush and a comprehensive immigration bill, and the White House yesterday predicted that the chamber's Republicans will give in.
    White House press secretary Tony Snow said House Republicans will want to pass border security badly enough to back down from the fight against what many consider amnesty for illegal aliens, knowing there is a "heavier political price for failing to act, than for acting."
    "If you are a Republican member of Congress and you're concerned about illegal immigration, do you really want to say to your constituents: You know, I'm going to wait a couple of years before I take up the issue of people knowingly hiring illegal aliens, I want to wait a couple of years before I go ahead and try to identify who the illegal aliens are, I want to wait a couple of years before I start grappling with what to do with these 11 or 12 million people who are here illegally," Mr. Snow said.
    A president always has the most influence in the backroom House-Senate negotiations, but yesterday, Mr. Snow wouldn't tip the administration's hand when asked how they would approach the conference committee.
    "At this point, let's get a bill through the Senate, let's figure out where the fault lines are," he said.
    But those fault lines between the House and Senate are fairly public, deep and fundamental.
    The House passed a bill in December that stepped up border enforcement and interior enforcement, enabled local law enforcement in border areas to help enforce immigration laws and cracked down on employers who hired illegal aliens.
    The Senate included some of those measures but put far more emphasis on future foreign workers and a pathway to citizenship for the current estimated 10 million to 12 million illegal aliens, a move House Republicans consider an unacceptable amnesty.
    "If both parties in a negotiation are running the other way, they will never meet in any middle," said Don Stewart, spokesman for Sen. John Cornyn, Texas Republican.
    "The question for the House is some agreement to do more than just border security. The question for the Senate is: Are they willing to be less generous than the Senate bill? Without a yes on both of those two questions, there's no point in the conference going forward."
    From the House side, Majority Leader John A. Boehner acknowledged there were "two very separate and distinct directions that we're going," but said he still thinks they can reach an agreement with the Senate.
    Still, the Ohio Republican said, the House position is clear.

    "You can't control the problem without first strengthening the borders and beginning to enforce the laws," said Mr. Boehner.
    Mr. Bush last week called the Senate measure "a good immigration bill." He also recently reversed his administration's earlier position and now endorses the idea of a path to citizenship for some illegal aliens.
    He said any final bill must include border security, employer sanctions, a temporary-worker program and a way to handle the current illegal alien population.
    Rep. Jack Kingston, Georgia Republican, said the House has some areas in common with the Senate, including provisions to build more fencing -- 370 miles in the Senate version and 698 miles in the House version.
    Mr. Kingston said House Republicans are willing to accept a temporary-worker program for future workers but, in exchange, would have to win agreement on delaying it until the borders are secure and adopting some sort of biometric identification card.
    "We think probably we might be able to do something on a temporary visa basis, but where we will have a line in the sand is on the pathway to citizenship, because pathway to citizenship, by almost any angle, leads to somebody's definition of amnesty," he said. "We don't want 'Republican' and 'amnesty' in the same sentence."
    He estimated that there are 180 members of the House "just adamant about no amnesty."
    Although Mr. Bush has generally favored the Senate's approach and has recently said some illegal aliens can gain citizenship, he has been insistent that future foreign workers not have a path to citizenship. That sets up a major conflict with the Senate, where the bill that passed yesterday does grant that right to future workers.
    Mr. Bush did win an unlikely ally in former President Jimmy Carter, a Democrat, who this week said Mr. Bush's efforts to create a right to citizenship have been "quite admirable."

  3. #3
    Lets dissect this article and let me point out a few explosive threat that were made in this rticle.
    --


    White House press secretary Tony Snow
    said House Republicans will want to pass border security badly enough to back down from the fight against what many consider amnesty for illegal aliens, knowing there is a "heavier political price for failing to act, than for acting."
    ----
    This quote above is exactly what ive always talked about...i believe the senate bill will be rewritten, but nothing in the guest worker will change, at least nothing important...The bill will be tronger on border enforcement and the ultimadum will be " get a strong enforement+guest worker program or you WONT GET ANYTHING" and this will be a decision that will be hard for all GOP facing re election to make.\

    Just like snmow concluded, they will definatly yield and i dont see them stick to this enforcment-only approach..everyone knows that they will have to give up this extreme hardline or the democrats will take over.

  4. #4
    Dream on, guys. It's not gonna happen!!

  5. #5
    there is a "heavier political price for failing to act, than for acting."
    ---

    Quotes by press secretary tony snow ..and let me say that i couldnt agree with him anymore...At the end of the day, members of the senate will not face re election whyle 2/3 of the house will...At the end of the day, the senate holds all the good cards because they COULD EASILY HOLD THEIR GROUND AND WIT THEM OUT.

    MY PREDICTION IS, THE HOUSE WILL BREAK AS THE NOVEMBER ELECTIONS GETS NEAR...THOSE MEMBERS MIGHT SAY ON TV THAT THEY WONT ACCEPT ENFORCMENT + GUEST WORKER, BUT DEEP DOWN, YOU KNOW THEY JUST WANT TO GET SOME TYPE OF ENFORCMENT SIGN INTO LAW AND MOVE ON..

    senate hold a major advantage.

  6. #6
    In the last analysis, House has an option not to name conferees at all and INSTEAD attach ENFORCEMENT ONLY Bill to one of the "MUST PASS" Bills (Appropriations Bill) and have it passed before November.

    So, if they really want "Enforcement ONLY" they will get it.

    Moreover, I think it's in the interests of immigrants that House does just that: to pass extremely anti-immigrant Bill is the best way to accelerate the passage of full amnesty - which will become inevitable once the impact of too extreme measures felt all accross.

    Regards,

    IE

  7. #7

  8. #8
    I am sure they'll pass the bill with some kind of amnesty, because it is too dangerous to leave 12 million illegals stay in shadows.

    Imagine for a moment what's going to happen if there will be no amnesty...in particular, imagine how illegals will react! 12 million pist off, dangerous, undocumented 'felons' with no identity and no hope...What do you think they will do? Go home? I don't think so!!!

  9. #9

  10. #10
    mpodcsin has a good point. Do you remember the Los Angeles riots in the 90's?
    I could see that this could lead to an angry mass of people. The question is.... does the House care? *G*

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