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Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Question - Special Case?

  1. #1
    Hi there,
    I have a few questions regarding a special case my friend's family is in.

    My friend's brother has received a deportation notice but here's the problem:

    Her brother is now 24 and has been raised in the US ever since he was, like, 5 or 6 years old. When he was brought over from China, the parents never helped apply for his US citizenship. That's because my friend's parents were trying to get their own green card at that time and had to wait. When he was 5/6, he received a deportation notice way back then, but, like I said, the parents were applying for the green card, so they were waiting. So, the deportation notice was left alone.

    But, things got messed up along the way (like scammy and fradulent lawyers...it was all just bad luck) and even now, her parents don't have their green cards and neither does her brother. They received another deportation notice in 1999 and they went to another lawyer trying to get help. But, like all the other cases, the lawyer turned out to be useless and was just trying to get their money.

    So now, my question for my friend is:

    Isn't there any way for her brother to stay in the US? He received his first deportation notice when he was 5/6 years old, so he didn't know anything about it being that young (he didn't even know how to speak English), otherwise he would've gone back. And the second time (in 1999), he thought the lawyer would be able to take care of it or find a way to help, so he didn't do anything either.

    My friend was just curious because it seems unfair to her. He was involuntarily brought over to the US at such a young age, had no clue about what was going on, and has lived/grew up in the US ever since. He basically considers himself "an American" so his life would be very hard trying to live in an enviroment that he is unfamiliar with (even though he is Chinese). There must be some kind of way to keep him in the US since he was involuntarily brought over and had no idea what to do, that's why he ignored the deportation notice.

    The lawyer they're going to said there was a good chance to appeal/re-open the brother's case and just 2 days ago, the laywer called and said there was no chance. What is with that?

    Thanks for the help in advance.

  2. #2
    Hi there,
    I have a few questions regarding a special case my friend's family is in.

    My friend's brother has received a deportation notice but here's the problem:

    Her brother is now 24 and has been raised in the US ever since he was, like, 5 or 6 years old. When he was brought over from China, the parents never helped apply for his US citizenship. That's because my friend's parents were trying to get their own green card at that time and had to wait. When he was 5/6, he received a deportation notice way back then, but, like I said, the parents were applying for the green card, so they were waiting. So, the deportation notice was left alone.

    But, things got messed up along the way (like scammy and fradulent lawyers...it was all just bad luck) and even now, her parents don't have their green cards and neither does her brother. They received another deportation notice in 1999 and they went to another lawyer trying to get help. But, like all the other cases, the lawyer turned out to be useless and was just trying to get their money.

    So now, my question for my friend is:

    Isn't there any way for her brother to stay in the US? He received his first deportation notice when he was 5/6 years old, so he didn't know anything about it being that young (he didn't even know how to speak English), otherwise he would've gone back. And the second time (in 1999), he thought the lawyer would be able to take care of it or find a way to help, so he didn't do anything either.

    My friend was just curious because it seems unfair to her. He was involuntarily brought over to the US at such a young age, had no clue about what was going on, and has lived/grew up in the US ever since. He basically considers himself "an American" so his life would be very hard trying to live in an enviroment that he is unfamiliar with (even though he is Chinese). There must be some kind of way to keep him in the US since he was involuntarily brought over and had no idea what to do, that's why he ignored the deportation notice.

    The lawyer they're going to said there was a good chance to appeal/re-open the brother's case and just 2 days ago, the laywer called and said there was no chance. What is with that?

    Thanks for the help in advance.

  3. #3
    You may want to get a second consultation. It is unfair that parents do such things to their children, but if he is not legally in the US, he may be removed. Afterwards, since he is Chinese, it is up to the Chinese to take care of him.

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