ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 46

Thread: US faces Iraq 'guerrilla war'

  1. #1
    Guest
    The US chief of military operations in Iraq has admitted that attacks against American troops in the country bear the hallmarks of a "classic guerrilla-type campaign".
    ________________________________________________

    His comments - on a day that saw one soldier killed and a missile fired at a US cargo plane - represent a remarkable acknowledgement, the BBC's Nick Childs at the Pentagon says. Pentagon officials have been reluctant until now to admit to a guerrilla campaign, describing the attacks as uncoordinated violence by remnants of the Baathist regime. "I think describing it as guerrilla tactics is a proper way to describe it in strictly military terms," US Central Command head General John Abizaid said at the first briefing in his new job. "It's low intensity but it's war however you describe it."

    General Abizaid's comments came as US soldiers posted in Iraq spoke out in the media expressing frustration and fear about the growing number of attacks on US targets. Public anxiety about events on the ground in Iraq is growing in the US and beginning to present real political problems for the Bush administration, our correspondent says.

    In Wednesday's attacks: One soldier died and two were injured in an explosion which hit their convoy as they travelled west of the capital Baghdad, near Abu Ghraib. A surface-to-air missile was fired at an American transport plane as it landed at Baghdad airport, in what a spokesman said was possibly the first such attack during the conflict. The pro-American mayor of the western Iraqi town of Haditha and one of his sons were shot and killed. At least three other US soldiers were wounded in separate attacks in Baghdad.


    Correspondents say US forces in Iraq are becoming increasingly nervous and desperate to return home. One soldier at the scene of Wednesday's convoy blast wept and another raked the ground with machine gun fire. "We need more protection. We've seen enough. We've stayed in Iraq long enough," one soldier travelling in the convoy said. And in interviews with American television network ABC, other US servicemen in Iraq expressed their unhappiness. "If Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld was here, I'd ask him for his resignation," said a member of the 3rd Infantry Division based in the flashpoint town Falluja, west of Baghdad. "I don't have any clue as to why we are still in Iraq," said another. There is growing anger in the United States about delays in bringing troops home - particularly from the 3rd Infantry Division which helped conquer Baghdad.

    Their return has been delayed four times. General Abizaid said they would be returning in September, but added their homecoming was conditional on replacements being ready. The BBC's Peter Greste says Iraqis working with Americans are also becoming increasingly frightened about the risk to their own lives. He says translators are worried about reprisals from the militias.

    General Abizaid said that US military commanders had expected attacks on US forces to increase throughout July because of the number of public holidays associated with the former Baathist regime that fall within the period. We just lost one of our buddies. It could have been any of us. He described the current resistance as coming from mid-level Baath party members and security forces and former soldiers from Iraq's Republican Guard in addition to "significant terrorist groups". He said they appeared to be organised in cells of 6 - 8 people and were receiving financial assistance from regional level leaders of the former Baathist regime. "We take casualties and we cause casualties because we are at war," he said. More than 30 US troops have been killed as a result of hostile action since US President George W Bush declared major combat over on 1 May.

    Since then the US has increased its forces to 148,000 while the UK contribution has dropped to 11,000. Senator John Kerry of the opposition Democratic Party in the US, a presidential hopeful, said the Bush administration should move quickly to bring other countries into the post-war effort to take the focus off American troops. "The obligation of the United States Government and the president is to rapidly internationalise the effort in Iraq, get the target off of American troops, bring other people, particularly Muslim-speaking and Arabic-speaking Muslim troops, into the region," he told CNN. The White House played down suggestions of falling morale among US troops in Iraq. "The troops recognise that what they are doing is very important - helping secure and stabilise Iraq so that it can move towards freedom and democracy," said Scott McClellan, chief spokesman for US President George W Bush.



    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3072899.stm

  2. #2
    Guest
    The US chief of military operations in Iraq has admitted that attacks against American troops in the country bear the hallmarks of a "classic guerrilla-type campaign".
    ________________________________________________

    His comments - on a day that saw one soldier killed and a missile fired at a US cargo plane - represent a remarkable acknowledgement, the BBC's Nick Childs at the Pentagon says. Pentagon officials have been reluctant until now to admit to a guerrilla campaign, describing the attacks as uncoordinated violence by remnants of the Baathist regime. "I think describing it as guerrilla tactics is a proper way to describe it in strictly military terms," US Central Command head General John Abizaid said at the first briefing in his new job. "It's low intensity but it's war however you describe it."

    General Abizaid's comments came as US soldiers posted in Iraq spoke out in the media expressing frustration and fear about the growing number of attacks on US targets. Public anxiety about events on the ground in Iraq is growing in the US and beginning to present real political problems for the Bush administration, our correspondent says.

    In Wednesday's attacks: One soldier died and two were injured in an explosion which hit their convoy as they travelled west of the capital Baghdad, near Abu Ghraib. A surface-to-air missile was fired at an American transport plane as it landed at Baghdad airport, in what a spokesman said was possibly the first such attack during the conflict. The pro-American mayor of the western Iraqi town of Haditha and one of his sons were shot and killed. At least three other US soldiers were wounded in separate attacks in Baghdad.


    Correspondents say US forces in Iraq are becoming increasingly nervous and desperate to return home. One soldier at the scene of Wednesday's convoy blast wept and another raked the ground with machine gun fire. "We need more protection. We've seen enough. We've stayed in Iraq long enough," one soldier travelling in the convoy said. And in interviews with American television network ABC, other US servicemen in Iraq expressed their unhappiness. "If Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld was here, I'd ask him for his resignation," said a member of the 3rd Infantry Division based in the flashpoint town Falluja, west of Baghdad. "I don't have any clue as to why we are still in Iraq," said another. There is growing anger in the United States about delays in bringing troops home - particularly from the 3rd Infantry Division which helped conquer Baghdad.

    Their return has been delayed four times. General Abizaid said they would be returning in September, but added their homecoming was conditional on replacements being ready. The BBC's Peter Greste says Iraqis working with Americans are also becoming increasingly frightened about the risk to their own lives. He says translators are worried about reprisals from the militias.

    General Abizaid said that US military commanders had expected attacks on US forces to increase throughout July because of the number of public holidays associated with the former Baathist regime that fall within the period. We just lost one of our buddies. It could have been any of us. He described the current resistance as coming from mid-level Baath party members and security forces and former soldiers from Iraq's Republican Guard in addition to "significant terrorist groups". He said they appeared to be organised in cells of 6 - 8 people and were receiving financial assistance from regional level leaders of the former Baathist regime. "We take casualties and we cause casualties because we are at war," he said. More than 30 US troops have been killed as a result of hostile action since US President George W Bush declared major combat over on 1 May.

    Since then the US has increased its forces to 148,000 while the UK contribution has dropped to 11,000. Senator John Kerry of the opposition Democratic Party in the US, a presidential hopeful, said the Bush administration should move quickly to bring other countries into the post-war effort to take the focus off American troops. "The obligation of the United States Government and the president is to rapidly internationalise the effort in Iraq, get the target off of American troops, bring other people, particularly Muslim-speaking and Arabic-speaking Muslim troops, into the region," he told CNN. The White House played down suggestions of falling morale among US troops in Iraq. "The troops recognise that what they are doing is very important - helping secure and stabilise Iraq so that it can move towards freedom and democracy," said Scott McClellan, chief spokesman for US President George W Bush.



    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3072899.stm

  3. #3
    Guest
    well it is hard to say what the US military faces in war ralvage Iraq . This is a new war for some they see it as pocket of resistance but it is something to take seriously. I like this BUSH guy I mean he jus an ordinary man. But when it comes to politics he jus too far from diplamcy and insightness. Governing Texax is way too different from been president of the USA overseeing the wide world politics..... The war with Iraq was an example ,unnecessarity. The best way to have won this war in Iraq with out a single bullet and a life lost was to mount the pressure on SAdamm and assisnate him. Now sadam might come to Power!!! US will have to pulled out !!! innocent lives is uncounted for day by day by new wave of gurrilla tactics .... I hope maries be safe some are friends, classmate, and who knows,next door neighbors

  4. #4
    Guest
    What did you expect? Historically every country did fight for own freedom - do you remember Russia and Napoleon, Russia and Hitler, Vietnam ...

  5. #5
    Guest
    US, Britain close ranks over Iraq war case but fail to quell storm
    ________________________________________________

    BAGHDAD (AFP) - The furore over the US-led coalition's case for war in Iraq refused to die down despite a vigorous defence by British Prime Minister Tony Blair in an address to the US Congress. Blair insisted the coalition's overthrow of Saddam Hussein would be vindicated by history even if no weapons of mass destruction were found, a formulation that was seized on by the British press as an admission the coalition's main pretext for war might have been false. And in a macabre twist, police in London announced they had found a body near the home of missing Iraq arms expert David Kelly, the presumed source of some of the most damaging media criticism of the coalition's alleged embellishment of its case for war.

    "History will forgive" the United States and Britain for waging war on Iraq even if it was uncertain whether Baghdad posed a threat from weapons of mass destruction, Blair said. Closing ranks with President George W. Bush over the toppling of Saddam's regime and the pre-war intelligence on Iraq's nuclear ambitions they used to justify it, Blair argued the threat of nuclear and other dangerous weapons falling into the wrong hands "isn't fantasy. It is a 21st century reality". "Can we be sure that terrorism and weapons of mass destruction will join together?" he asked. "Let us say one thing: If we are wrong, we will have destroyed a threat that, at its least, is responsible for inhuman carnage and suffering. That is something I am confident history will forgive.

    "But if our critics are wrong, if we are right ... and we do not act, then we will have hesitated in the face of this menace when we should have given leadership. That is something history will not forgive." British newspapers seized on Blair's remarks as evidence of flip-flopping by the premier. "Blair moves the goalposts" headlined the right-wing tabloid Daily Mail, adding in its editorial that "this was Blair the brilliant contortionist trying to have it both ways". The left-leaning Guardian said Blair's shift over weapons of mass destruction had been a "significant softening" and "watering down" of Britain's stance on the issue.

    The discovery of a body near the west London home of British arms expert Kelly threatened to further fan the flames. Blair was informed of the find as he flew on from Washington for a visit to Japan, a spokesman said. The 59-year-old Kelly has been fingered as the possible source of a BBC report charging the British government "s e x e d up" its pre-war dossier on Baghdad's alleged arms capabilities. His disappearance came just two days after he gave evidence to a British parliamentary inquiry. As the domestic controversy raged on, US Deputy Defence Secretary Paul Wolfowitz visited American troops in Iraq in a bid to boost morale dented by almost daily attacks a full 100 days after Saddam Hussein's ouster.

    Wolfowitz and top civil administrator Paul Bremer flew by helicopter to the Abu Gharib prison, a symbol of the horrors of Saddam's regime, just west of Baghdad. The visit came as the Pentagon published an independent study into its reconstruction efforts in Iraq which warned that the coalition was running out of time in its efforts to harness Iraqi goodwill. The study, by the Council on Foreign Relations and the Centre for Strategic and International Studies, urged a broad expansion in the number of states involved, warning: "Financial and human resource needs cannot be met by the US coalition alone." Along with almost daily US casualties, the huge and mounting cost of the war is causing concern in the United States. Keeping around 150,000 troops in Iraq as well as financing rebuilding is costing 130 million dollars a day.

    Moscow said Friday that it might consider sending troops to Iraq, but only if the UN Security Council approved an international peacekeeping force, something Washington has so far ruled out. "I believe it would be possible if the UN Security Council were to approve such a resolution," Russian foreign ministry spokesman Alexander Yakovenko told reporters. In a sign of the US administration's concern to start bringing home its troops, the New York Times reported Washington was considering establishing a private security force to take over responsibility for guarding 2,000 Iraqi sites. Iraq's ousted president, meanwhile, returned to haunt the administration Thursday with an audio recording reputed to be Saddam hailing Iraqis who have mounted daily attacks on coalition forces. The message, aired on several Arab television stations as Iraq marked the 35th anniversary of the seizure of power by Saddam's Baath party, was followed by a demonstration in the flashpoint town of Fallujah, west of Baghdad.

  6. #6
    Guest
    Don get me wrong I love the USA but war with Iraq is bound to be a failure... cuz bush is running international affairs like state of TAXis this is not very truth...... insurgency by sadam loyalists and other muslims fundermentalist including OSAMA BIN LADEN movement will go into Iraq to retribute the american led coaliation ... it is going to be tought...... God safe the marines and innocent Iraquis lives.... maybe Bush was too quick to cliam military end to major combat for getting to understand the deposed president should have been denounced as dead or capture to cliam such announcents on high sea. or perhap Bush wanted to fly so he make up that speech of""major cobat is over in iraqu""

  7. #7
    Guest
    BAGHDAD, Iraq - Insurgents attacked a convoy with explosives, killing one American soldier, and fatally shot another who was guarding a bank in the Iraqi capital, while a prominent Shiite cleric on Friday urged Iraqis to politically oppose a U.S.-appointed government. Muqtada al-Sadr, addressing thousands at a mosque in the central holy city of Kufa, vowed to establish a council "of the righteous" that would rival the new government. The two American deaths brought the total U.S. personnel killed in combat since the March 20 start of the war to 149 " two more than the 1991 Gulf War total " as anti-U.S. violence persists, including by loyalists of deposed President Saddam Hussein. A new audio recording purportedly by Saddam urging Iraqis to continue a "holy war" against U.S. forces is probably authentic, a U.S. intelligence official said Friday. The message aired Thursday, the 35th anniversary of the coup that brought Saddam's Baath Party to power. It was likely recorded recently " a finding that was further evidence Saddam survived the war, said the official, speaking on condition of anonymity.

    The Americans, meanwhile, celebrated victory by blowing up a towering statue of Saddam Hussein in the deposed dictator's hometown and seizing its head as a war trophy. The soldier from the U.S. 1st Infantry Division was shot at about 2 a.m. Saturday outside the Al-Rasheed Bank in western Baghdad, said Cpl. Todd Pruden, a spokesman for the military. The military had originally reported the soldier died Friday afternoon. Pruden said the soldier was shot and killed by small arms fire. He gave no other details and the soldier's name was being withheld pending notification of next of kin. The attack on the convoy came Friday afternoon when a bomb was detonated by remote control at a traffic circle near the main bridge over the Euphrates River in Fallujah, a city west of Baghdad, according to Sgt. Amy Abbott, a military spokeswoman. She said a soldier from the 3rd Infantry Division died. U.S. military engineers discovered another bomb in Baghdad but defused it. Shopkeeper Abdul Munin Ali, who was swimming in the Euphrates when he heard the explosion, said he saw four soldiers evacuated " three in ambulances and one by helicopter. But a Pentagon spokeswoman said the dead soldier was the only casualty.

    "America is the enemy of God," a crowd chanted as the servicemen towed away a charred Humvee.

    The attack was the latest in a wave of anti-American violence in Fallujah, where many residents object to U.S. patrols, saying soldiers ogle Iraqi women and don't respect Iraqi traditions. The Americans withdrew from key Fallujah positions last week, but anger at the Americans remains high. "We support the attacks because they are occupiers and infidels," said Yasser Younis, who works in an ice factory. "They promised us democracy and reconstruction, but they have done nothing." Insurgents also targeted American troops in Baghdad, leaving a 3-foot-long bomb on a highway median in the western part of the city. Army engineers spotted the device and dismantled it. The bomb was built into a large mold for ice blocks and hidden in a white burlap sack, said Lt. Robertrel Sachi of Columbus, Ohio. "It was wired to a remote-controlled doorbell ringer. It had a 100-foot blast radius," he said. Soldiers searched nearby houses but made no arrests. Troops dismantled the bomb's blasting cap and said they would explode it in a remote area. "We blow that here, and we'll shatter every window for blocks around," Sachi said. Several hours later, a large explosion rocked a site in southwestern Baghdad where the military often destroys ammunition. The bomb was found at the same site where an attack on an American convoy Monday killed one soldier and wounded four. Residents said they were afraid. "I'm worried, because my children always walk here," said Ali Mohammed, 31, a guard at a construction site near where the bomb was planted.

    Violence against U.S. troops has been concentrated in Iraq's "Sunni Triangle," stretching north and west from Baghdad. Iraq's minority Sunni Muslims have long ruled the country, and many of them fear Saddam's ouster will swing the balance of power to majority Shiites. The new 25-member ruling council, appointed by the Americans, has a slim Shiite majority. At a major Sunni mosque in Baghdad, formerly known as the Mother of all Battles Mosque, preacher Khalid al-Dari called Friday for the Americans to leave Iraq and said the new U.S.-appointed government "will enshrine Iraq's sectarian differences." But imams at some Shiite mosques had harsh words for the Americans as well. Al-Sadr, the Shiite cleric who spoke to a crowd that overflowed onto the streets around the mosque in Kufa, said the government is comprised of "nonbelievers" who don't represent the people. "We will not cooperate with the council," he told the crowd. "We will form our own council. Iraq will then have two councils: one of the wrongdoers and one of the righteous."

    "Zionists!" the crowd chanted. "Zionist council!"

    In an interview later with The Associated Press, al-Sadr said he would launch a parallel government and draft a constitution in consultation with all the country's Islamic movements. "Eventually, we'll have a referendum separate from the Americans and, God willing, elections separate from the Americans," he said. In the northern city of Tikrit, soldiers from the 4th Infantry Division used plastic explosives to topple a 30-foot bronze statue of Saddam brandishing a sword atop a rearing horse. Pulling out their cameras, some soldiers stomped on the head of the statue, while others posed atop it. The soldiers carted the head to their base. The rest of the bronze will be shipped to Texas, where it will be melted down for a memorial, said Sgt. Maj. Gregory Glen. The toppling of Saddam's statue didn't play well for some in Tikrit. "He was the symbol of Iraq, and this action was like a challenge to us," said 32-year-old Hayam Latif. "We are ready to sacrifice ourselves for Saddam."

  8. #8
    Guest
    CAMP BABYLON, Iraq - Among the U.S. troops who captured Baghdad in April and then waited and waited " and are still waiting " for orders to go home, the outlook for a quick exit seems brightest here, home of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force and the 1st Marine Division. If all goes as planned, the 18,000 Marines who are working with local Iraqi authorities in seven southern provinces will all be gone within several weeks, officials said Saturday. The goal is to get thousands of Polish and other international troops here first for a transition that does not let slip the progress the Marines have made in piecing together a new Iraqi police force as a foundation for Iraq's security and rebuilding.

    On Saturday night, the 900 Marines of the 2nd Battalion of the 25th Marine Regiment handed over control in Dhi Qar province to a 3,000-soldier Italian brigade under British command. That frees all 900 Marines, reservists from New York City, to go home. In the Baghdad area and in territory to the west and north of the Iraqi capital, where the U.S. Army is in charge, American soldiers are being killed almost daily. Unlike in that so-called "Sunni Triangle" " where there is more loyalty to the ousted Saddam Hussein (news - web sites) " southern Iraq has proven remarkably peaceful since Saddam's ouster April 9.

    Saddam persecution of the predominantly Shiite Muslim region may be why coalition forces have been welcomed south of Baghdad, where Shiites live in greatest numbers. Shiites make up 60 percent of Iraq's 24 million people. The the Marines in southern Iraq have not lost one to hostile fire since April, Lt. Gen. James Conway, commander of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, said in an interview. The Army has been trying to get its 3rd Infantry Division home, but the increased violence in central Iraq has forced them to put off the return at least twice. Last week, officials said the division's 2nd Brigade would probably go home by Sept. 30 rather than in August, and even that is a target date that could slip if the security situation worsens.

    The outlook for the Marines is more straightforward. If international forces are ready to take over their areas of responsibility as expected, all 18,000 Marines could be out of Iraq by Sept. 1, officials said. Conway cautioned that no return date is guaranteed, but he indicated he is confident that the Marines have taken the right approach to establishing security in their part of Iraq. One key, he said, is interacting continually with regular Iraqis " especially children. "U.S. Marines have lost a lot of soccer games," he chuckled. "We don't really consider that we truly lost " a lot of goodwill was gained." Conway's staff gave Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz briefings Saturday on the security situation and the fundamentals of their approach to stabilizing southern Iraq.

    Maj. Gen. James Mattis, commander of the 1st Marine Division, summed up for Wolfowitz what Conway called "the U.S. Marine Corps way of doing business" with Iraqis. "No better friend, no worse enemy " it's your choice," he said the Iraqis are told. Conway told Wolfowitz of one new source of tension between his troops and local Iraqis: the locals' anger that Mohammed Jawad Anayfas escaped U.S. custody. The locals say Anayfas was responsible for mass killings of thousands of their neighbors who opposed Saddam in the early 1990s. The subject came up when Wolfowitz visited a mass grave estimated by U.S. officials to have held the remains of as many as 15,000 Iraqis. The site is about a mile south of the town of Mahawil, on land that local Iraqis say was owned by Anayfas.


    Anayfas was picked up by U.S. military forces on an unrelated charge. About a month ago, while he was being transferred from Baghdad to Um Qasr in southern Iraq, he managed to convince his holders that he was an innocent farmer. Not only was he allowed to leave, he was even given transportation, Conway said. Wolfowitz, who was not aware of the mistake, was visibly dismayed. Conway assured him the Anayfas would be recaptured and brought to justice for his alleged war crimes. In a whirlwind tour of Iraq, Wolfowitz also visited U.S. Marines in Karbala, south of Baghdad, and in Najaf, a southern city where hundreds of Iraqis greeted Wolfowitz's motorcade as it toured several neighborhoods. Wolfowitz also stopped briefly to attend an Iraqi town hall meeting, where local leaders told him the United States needs to do more to help Iraq.

  9. #9
    Guest
    LONDON - Prime Minister Tony Blair said he would take full responsibility if an inquiry finds the government contributed to the suicide of scientist David Kelly " identified Sunday by the British Broadcasting Corp. as its main source in accusing the government of hyping weapons evidence to justify war in Iraq. Blair, dogged on his trip through east Asia by angry charges about the Ministry of Defense adviser's death, said he has no intention of resigning over the dispute, as some critics at home have demanded. He welcomed the BBC's announcement, which temporarily shifted the angriest public criticism from his administration to the broadcaster, whose credibility came under attack. "In the end, the government is my responsibility and I can assure you the judge (heading the inquiry) will be able to get to what facts, what people, what papers he wants," Blair told Sky News. The prime minister also said at a joint news conference with South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun in Seoul that he would testify in the investigation.

    Kelly's suicide has visibly shaken Blair, who learned of it at the start of an exhausting Asian trip after flying first across the Atlantic to give a speech to the U.S. Congress. He appeared tense and preoccupied during appearances Saturday in Japan, and his characteristic wide grins were replaced by a withering glare when a reporter shouted: "Have you got blood on your hands, prime minister?" Blair's government and the state-funded BBC have been embroiled in a bitter, drawn-out battle over a May 29 radio report by journalist Andrew Gilligan. The report quoted an anonymous source as saying officials had "sexed up" evidence about Iraqi weapons to justify war and insisted on publishing a claim that Saddam Hussein could deploy some chemical and biological weapons within 45 minutes " despite intelligence experts' doubts. After Kelly, a quiet, bearded microbiologist with a sterling international reputation, told his Ministry of Defense bosses he'd spoken to Gilligan, the ministry identified him as a possible source for the report.

    Kelly was questioned by a parliamentary committee, and just days later, on Friday, police found his body in the woods near his Oxfordshire home. They said bled to death from a slashed left wrist. "We can confirm that Dr. Kelly was the principal source" for Gilligan's story, the BBC said in a statement Sunday. "The BBC believes we accurately interpreted and reported the factual information obtained by us during interviews with Dr. Kelly." The statement said Kelly had also been the source for a piece by reporter Susan Watts on its "Newsnight" analysis program. Politicians across the ideological spectrum accused the BBC of inaccurately reporting Kelly's comments, citing his parliamentary testimony that while he spoke privately to Gilligan, he did not recognize the journalist's most damaging claims as his own.

    "I believe I am not the main source," Kelly told the committee. "From the conversation I had, I don't see how (Gilligan) could make the authoritative statement he was making." Assuming the BBC had no secondary source who made the report's central claims, the critics accused Gilligan of twisting Kelly's words. Gilligan denied that Sunday evening. "I want to make it clear that I did not misquote or misrepresent Dr. David Kelly," Gilligan said in a statement pointing out that Kelly also had been a source for the "Newsnight" report.

    "Entirely separately from my meeting with him, Dr. Kelly expressed very similar concerns about Downing Street interpretation of intelligence in the dossier and the unreliability of the 45-minute point to 'Newsnight,'" his statement said. Conservative Party lawmaker Robert Jackson, who represents Kelly's home district, told the BBC earlier in the day that he believed Gilligan "dressed up what was said to him by Dr. Kelly." "I believe that the BBC has knowingly, for some weeks, been standing by a story that it knew was wrong," he said. Tory legislator Michael Fabricant defended the broadcaster, saying it had been right not to reveal Kelly's name until now. He said there was no evidence to suggest the BBC had misrepresented the scientist's comments. Throughout the dispute, the BBC had refused to say whether Kelly, who was a top United Nations weapons inspector in Iraq in the 1990s, had been its source. "Over the past few weeks we have been at pains to protect Dr. Kelly being identified as the source of these reports," the BBC statement said. "We clearly owed him a duty of confidentiality. Following his death, we now believe, in order to end the continuing speculation, it is important to release this information as swiftly as possible."

    The statement said the BBC had waited until Sunday to make the announcement at the Kelly family's request. The BBC, one of the world's most respected news organizations, would not comment on its reason for making a rare exception to journalists' normal practice of refusing to name anonymous sources. The network's statement said it would cooperate fully with the inquiry into Kelly's suicide, providing details of its reporters' contacts with the scientist including their notes. "We continue to believe we were right to place Dr. Kelly's views in the public domain," the BBC statement said. "However, the BBC is profoundly sorry that his involvement as our source has ended so tragically." Gilligan's report helped prompt two parliamentary probes into the government's weapons claims, and Blair aides for weeks been demanding a retraction and an apology.

  10. #10
    Guest
    The credibility of President Bush (news - web sites) and the nation are at stake with the information that led the United States into the Iraq war, two members of the Senate Intelligence Committee say. Investigations under way by the committee's staff, the CIA and the FBI marked a good beginning, Sens. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., and Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., said Sunday on CNN's "Late Edition." "Ultimately, the public needs to be reassured that, in fact, the intelligence the president was given ....(and) was used, and how he framed the debate and the decision to go into Iraq, was intelligence that they can have confidence in," Hagel said. "And that's, by the way, important for the world to have that same confidence in our word."

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...168/4qng2.html

    A crucial question will be to determine how Bush's State of the Union address on Jan. 28 came to include a reference to what U.S. intelligence had determined was an incorrect British report that Iraq was shopping for uranium in Africa. "There are plenty of investigations, and the question is, what's the point of them?" said Rockefeller, the intelligence committee's vice chairman. "The point of them is to find out if we were being misled, if somebody inserted that in" despite earlier objections by CIA Director George Tenet. On "Fox News Sunday," Rockefeller said Bush could make the controversy go away by coming clean whether the justification for war was exaggerated. "It's just a question of was it right, or was it wrong?" he said.

    Rockefeller said the argument should not be personalized or politicized. Because of Bush's policy of maintaining the right of pre-emptive attacks against potentially dangerous governments, he said, "intelligence is the basis now of war-fighting." Therefore, Rockefeller said, "it's very important to intelligence to say that facts really do matter, they count, they have to be accurate." Rockefeller told CNN he requested FBI involvement in the case after the International Atomic Energy Agency debunked the British report. He and Senate Intelligence Committee chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan., requested CIA and State Department investigations. The House Intelligence Committee is conducting its own probe. Hagel said ensuring that the American public and the world have confidence in the word of the United States "is the essence of the exercise here."

    Defending the administration, House Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., said the decision to include the 16-word Iraqi uranium-shopping sentence "was made by the speechwriters and by the folks in the White House" using various intelligence sources that were thought reliable. White House officials have acknowledged the report should not have appeared in the speech and have issued varying versions of why it was. Bush's national security adviser, Condoleezza Rice, has said no top White House officials knew of a report by a CIA emissary that said the report appeared to be bogus. But Sen. Bob Graham (news, bio, voting record) of Florida, a Democratic presidential candidate, said intelligence was available that should have made Bush realize the information in the uranium report was suspect. One source was Vice President **** Cheney, he told CBS' "Face the Nation."

    "The vice president is the one who went to the CIA on several occasions. He asked specifically for additional information on the Niger-Iraq connection. The United States sent an experienced ambassador, who came back after a full review with a report that these were fabricated documents," Graham said. "You cannot tell me that the vice president didn't receive the same report that the CIA received, and that the vice president didn't communicate that report to the president or national security advisers to the president."





    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...d=512&ncid=716

Similar Threads

  1. Think the Iraq war is expensive??
    By Defend Our Borders in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-24-2008, 03:28 PM
  2. The Iraq War
    By macyuhoo in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-11-2006, 07:39 AM
  3. US faces Iraq 'guerrilla war'
    By in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-17-2003, 05:14 AM
  4. Lawsuit Challenges Bush on War With Iraq
    By in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-16-2003, 11:21 PM
  5. FEB 15: THE INTERNATIONAL DAY AGAINST WAR ON IRAQ
    By in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 02-16-2003, 11:02 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: