ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Home Page


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

移民日报

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily


Chinese Immig. Daily




The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of
free information!
Copyright
1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: The Behavior of some Muslims in the USA - Part I

  1. #1
    Guest
    Twenty more people * 16 Upstate women and four Pakistani
    men --
    pleaded guilty Thursday to marriage fraud, admitting to entering sham
    marriages where women received money to wed illegal aliens seeking
    green cards.

    It was the third wave of guilty pleas stemming from an investigation
    dubbed
    Operation Broken Vows.

    The federal investigation led to charges against 221 people * including
    partners in 107 marriages and seven people charged with conspiring to
    arrange the marriages, said Kevin McDonald, the assistant U.S. attorney
    who
    prosecuted the cases. More pleas are expected Monday in Spartanburg.

    One Greenville woman, 15 Spartanburg women and the four men, flanked by
    their attorneys, stood shoulder to shoulder before U.S. District Judge
    G.
    Ross Anderson during the hearing at the federal courthouse in Anderson.

    The women admitted to accepting between $1,000 and $1,500 to marry men
    from
    Pakistan and Tunisia, except for one woman who said she was taken on a
    shopping spree and bought about $500 worth of baby clothes rather than
    accepting money, McDonald said.

    None of the marriages were consummated, and the couples didn't live
    together, the women said as they were questioned one by one.

    The men came from around the nation and returned to their homes and
    jobs
    elsewhere after weddings were performed in probate courts in
    Greenville,
    Spartanburg and Cherokee counties, McDonald said.

    The charge of marriage fraud is a felony and carries a maximum penalty
    of
    five years in prison and a $250,000 fine, lawyers said.

    The women, except for two facing unrelated charges, were released on
    bond
    and ordered to return to court for sentencing later.

    McDonald said the sentences probably will range between four and 30
    months
    under federal guidelines and that some of the women may be eligible for
    probation.

    Anderson ordered that the four Pakistani men -- from New York, New
    Jersey,
    Pennsylvania and Virginia -- be deported immediately.

    Authorities are looking for about 75 more people, mostly men, indicted
    in
    Operation Broken Vows and considered to be fugitives.

    Most of the weddings took place before Sept. 11, 2001, McDonald said.

    Jimmy Brehm, a Greenville attorney, said the women married for money,
    "not
    to endanger anyone."

    The federal Immigration and Naturalization Service doesn't recognize
    the
    marriages, but they are binding in South Carolina, lawyers said. The
    women
    would need to file for annulments or divorces to end the marriages,
    lawyers
    said.

    After the hearing, Anderson said that he has never seen a case of this
    sort
    in his 22 years on the bench.

    The roundup, which McDonald said is the largest he knows of in the
    nation,
    resulted from a tip. He said he knew of no particular reason that South
    Carolina became the destination for the men involved.

    "Word permeated through this group that they could come to South
    Carolina
    and try to achieve this permanent resident status," McDonald said.

    The group of women included fast-food and service industry workers,
    single
    mothers and some students, McDonald said.

    "A thousand bucks to them is as big as the side of that wall, but
    you've
    got to enforce the law," Anderson said. "All of them said they were
    aware
    of what they were doing. We've got a complete and blatant violation of
    the
    immigration law."

    At the time of the initial arrests in October, about 40 of the women
    charged were allowed to plead before U.S. Magistrate William Cato to a
    lesser charge of aiding and abetting an alien. They were sentenced to
    six
    months' probation and 75 hours of community service for the
    misdemeanor.

    Last month, 13 women and three men pleaded guilty to marriage fraud in
    federal court in Greenville. The women await sentencing and the men
    were
    ordered deported.

    The women who pleaded guilty to marriage fraud in Anderson on Thursday
    were
    Terri Amanda Boyd, 22; Sheron Denise Byrd, 33; Latrenda Roxsand
    Dawkins,
    22; Michael Alicia Foster, 25; Katoshia Gray, 25; Shawnetta Denise
    Henderson, 31; Sonya Evette Hoey, 29; Timmia Holcomb, 37; Christina
    Lash
    Hull, 22; India Yikeesha Jackson, 23, Giuynita Ann Jeter, 23; Nakima
    Littlejohn, 24; Stephanie Mack, 40; Precious Latrice Martin, 23; and
    Tonya
    Denise Miller, 31, all of Spartanburg, and Koniskis Jones, 23, of
    Greenville.

    The men who pleaded guilty Thursday to marriage fraud in Anderson were
    Karim Ullah, 48, who was arrested in Brooklyn, N.Y.; Pirdad Khan, 49,
    who
    was arrested in Newark, N.J.; Mohiudin Syed, 50, who was arrested in
    Philadelphia; and Amjid Hussain, 32, who was arrested in Arlington, Va.

  2. #2
    Guest
    Twenty more people * 16 Upstate women and four Pakistani
    men --
    pleaded guilty Thursday to marriage fraud, admitting to entering sham
    marriages where women received money to wed illegal aliens seeking
    green cards.

    It was the third wave of guilty pleas stemming from an investigation
    dubbed
    Operation Broken Vows.

    The federal investigation led to charges against 221 people * including
    partners in 107 marriages and seven people charged with conspiring to
    arrange the marriages, said Kevin McDonald, the assistant U.S. attorney
    who
    prosecuted the cases. More pleas are expected Monday in Spartanburg.

    One Greenville woman, 15 Spartanburg women and the four men, flanked by
    their attorneys, stood shoulder to shoulder before U.S. District Judge
    G.
    Ross Anderson during the hearing at the federal courthouse in Anderson.

    The women admitted to accepting between $1,000 and $1,500 to marry men
    from
    Pakistan and Tunisia, except for one woman who said she was taken on a
    shopping spree and bought about $500 worth of baby clothes rather than
    accepting money, McDonald said.

    None of the marriages were consummated, and the couples didn't live
    together, the women said as they were questioned one by one.

    The men came from around the nation and returned to their homes and
    jobs
    elsewhere after weddings were performed in probate courts in
    Greenville,
    Spartanburg and Cherokee counties, McDonald said.

    The charge of marriage fraud is a felony and carries a maximum penalty
    of
    five years in prison and a $250,000 fine, lawyers said.

    The women, except for two facing unrelated charges, were released on
    bond
    and ordered to return to court for sentencing later.

    McDonald said the sentences probably will range between four and 30
    months
    under federal guidelines and that some of the women may be eligible for
    probation.

    Anderson ordered that the four Pakistani men -- from New York, New
    Jersey,
    Pennsylvania and Virginia -- be deported immediately.

    Authorities are looking for about 75 more people, mostly men, indicted
    in
    Operation Broken Vows and considered to be fugitives.

    Most of the weddings took place before Sept. 11, 2001, McDonald said.

    Jimmy Brehm, a Greenville attorney, said the women married for money,
    "not
    to endanger anyone."

    The federal Immigration and Naturalization Service doesn't recognize
    the
    marriages, but they are binding in South Carolina, lawyers said. The
    women
    would need to file for annulments or divorces to end the marriages,
    lawyers
    said.

    After the hearing, Anderson said that he has never seen a case of this
    sort
    in his 22 years on the bench.

    The roundup, which McDonald said is the largest he knows of in the
    nation,
    resulted from a tip. He said he knew of no particular reason that South
    Carolina became the destination for the men involved.

    "Word permeated through this group that they could come to South
    Carolina
    and try to achieve this permanent resident status," McDonald said.

    The group of women included fast-food and service industry workers,
    single
    mothers and some students, McDonald said.

    "A thousand bucks to them is as big as the side of that wall, but
    you've
    got to enforce the law," Anderson said. "All of them said they were
    aware
    of what they were doing. We've got a complete and blatant violation of
    the
    immigration law."

    At the time of the initial arrests in October, about 40 of the women
    charged were allowed to plead before U.S. Magistrate William Cato to a
    lesser charge of aiding and abetting an alien. They were sentenced to
    six
    months' probation and 75 hours of community service for the
    misdemeanor.

    Last month, 13 women and three men pleaded guilty to marriage fraud in
    federal court in Greenville. The women await sentencing and the men
    were
    ordered deported.

    The women who pleaded guilty to marriage fraud in Anderson on Thursday
    were
    Terri Amanda Boyd, 22; Sheron Denise Byrd, 33; Latrenda Roxsand
    Dawkins,
    22; Michael Alicia Foster, 25; Katoshia Gray, 25; Shawnetta Denise
    Henderson, 31; Sonya Evette Hoey, 29; Timmia Holcomb, 37; Christina
    Lash
    Hull, 22; India Yikeesha Jackson, 23, Giuynita Ann Jeter, 23; Nakima
    Littlejohn, 24; Stephanie Mack, 40; Precious Latrice Martin, 23; and
    Tonya
    Denise Miller, 31, all of Spartanburg, and Koniskis Jones, 23, of
    Greenville.

    The men who pleaded guilty Thursday to marriage fraud in Anderson were
    Karim Ullah, 48, who was arrested in Brooklyn, N.Y.; Pirdad Khan, 49,
    who
    was arrested in Newark, N.J.; Mohiudin Syed, 50, who was arrested in
    Philadelphia; and Amjid Hussain, 32, who was arrested in Arlington, Va.

  3. #3
    Guest
    This thread should be titled " The Behavior of the whole world in the USA".

    Mexicans are the leaders in sham marriges in this country. Muslims like all other minorties are only a small fraction.

  4. #4
    Guest
    The title of this post should be" THE BEHAVIOUR OF SOME CHRISTIANS IN AMERICA" IF you read your own post carefully, sixteen out of twenty who were caught are American Names and I don't know what religion they follow but since you assumed that the four non Ameicans were muslims then it's fair to assume that the sixteen Americans were Christians. Let's not bullshit here.

  5. #5
    Guest
    The mooselim men preyed on these women.

  6. #6
    Guest
    ah tell all yuh them moslems hate christians. they though want peace. they violent too bad. them is madingas.

  7. #7
    Guest
    Trini,
    You should have learn better english in the Mossad Academy, or may be you are just pretending to be a poor immigrant.

  8. #8
    Guest
    Paki go back where u come from. We don't want muslims in this country. You all are violent people who want to destroy our country.

Similar Threads

  1. abc Primetime - How Muslims Are Treated In USA
    By abercrombie_toronto in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-07-2010, 11:37 PM
  2. Muslims in USA
    By coptic dentist in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-14-2008, 09:42 AM
  3. The Behavior of some Muslims in the USA - Part II
    By in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-04-2003, 11:01 PM
  4. The Behavior of some Arabs in the USA - Part I
    By in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-04-2003, 11:00 PM
  5. The Behavior of Muslims towards the USA - Part I
    By in forum Immigration Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-04-2003, 10:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Put Free Immigration Law Headlines On Your Website

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers Enter your email address here: