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Thread: I challenge everyone to answer"what happens after the barr period has lapsed?"

  1. #1
    Guest
    I've been looking for a specific and factual answer to this question. I searched all over the internet and asked many lawyers and I get different answers. Mohan also answered this but no specifics has been given. I am a spouse of a USC and my barr is almost nearing its end. Do I still need a waiver? if not then what? I seeking help to all knowledgable here and post credible factual information.
    It is my great appreciation to those who can contribute.

  2. #2
    Guest
    I've been looking for a specific and factual answer to this question. I searched all over the internet and asked many lawyers and I get different answers. Mohan also answered this but no specifics has been given. I am a spouse of a USC and my barr is almost nearing its end. Do I still need a waiver? if not then what? I seeking help to all knowledgable here and post credible factual information.
    It is my great appreciation to those who can contribute.

  3. #3
    Guest
    It makes no sense that you would still need a waiver. The waiver is for the bar. Once the bar has expired the most likely case scenario is that you will not need a waiver.

    However, you will obviously still have to pass through the application process. Just because there is no waiver of the bar does not guarantee that you will be admitted, you must be otherwise admissable.

    You must show that you are admittable under all other circumstances (have not committed a felony, etc.) Also, if you are applying for something like a tourist visa, my personal belief is that they might turn you down based on your past record of overstay/illegal entry (or whatever) - the same may be true for things like student visas or work visas.

    My personal guess is that applying for permanent residency status (for example - as a spouse) should be no more difficult than normal once the bar has elapsed (assuming you have no record of a felony or other "black mark" on your record).

    I am not a lawyer, so I make no guarantees (although most lawyers would say the same)however, that is what seems like the most rational hard-line way of thinking (and is similar to what a lawyer told me).

    Good luck to you

  4. #4
    Guest
    If I were you instead of blaming other people who can't give you the answer you want to hear, why don't you call the INS. They know more than us or any lawyer whom you consulted. I assume they have all these SOS or rule to follow.

  5. #5
    Guest
    First of all I beg to differ that I am blaming anyone. It is quite clear that you don't have anything to write other than to bash or say irrelevant post. I agree with you in asking the INS myself...as you probably know, INS is probably the worst place to call since they are understaff and to my desmay I just get a computer that just turns me all over the place and no live person to talk to. If you can contribute then write it, if not then just keep reading on to what may help you on what you are seeking. In my opinion, no-one has any clue as to what happens after the barr, its either an assumption or just plain opinion, no hard facts. I have came into conclusion that this board has many respectable and knowlegable people that really do their due dilligence, I am just hoping that over the thousands of individuals that post, somehow somewhere someone will give me the answer based on facts. Thank you

  6. #6
    Guest
    You know what your attitude stinks! Beggars aren't choosers.What is wrong with my advice? Since no one wants to give you any then your only source is to call the INS office. It happened to me before, I called them and they gave me straight answer. You have the option to talk to a receptionist or a real Immigration Officer.You haven't even tried this and you just gave them crap right away. You won't get any advice from anyone here. We know you now.Hope you stay rotten in your country, you don't deserve to come here that's why you're deported.

  7. #7
    Guest
    I apologize for speaking freely. As I can see and quite apparent that you are a very illiterate person. First, I was not deported(I'm a USC), Second as you can see(if you can read english)I mentioned that I did call them and all I got was messaging systems and when I got a live person, she/he did not know what their talking about. Go back to school and learn to read!!!

  8. #8
    Guest
    Assuming the barr is for overstay since 2001 (when exactly?)?

    As far as I remember the bars to re-entry for illegal overstay are:

    up to 179 days = 3 yrs.
    180 and 364 days = 5 yrs.
    more than 365 = 10 yrs.

    other barrs exist for criminal offenses that can be statuary or permanent.

    Are you outside of the country at this time?
    If not, no barr time is being accumulated inside the U.S.


    If you're outside the U.S., how did you leave (where you ordered voluntary departure by a judge, or just left on your own), do you have prove of then you left? For spouses of U.S. citizens, a waiver of inadmissiability may be available. A good source of information is either your own research and a good attorney, the INS would neither be interrested nor capable to give you the information you may need.

    Good luck!

  9. #9
    Guest
    Its not an overstay. Its an expedited removal at port of entry due to misrepresentation. Barr is 5 years. My question is just basically what happens after the barr. I am full aware of the inadmisability status while within the barr period and a waiver is available if or when married to a USC. After the 5 year barr, what will be needed to re-enter the US?...

    Thanks

  10. #10
    Guest
    You can lie whatever you want but make sure you're good at it. Well you better go back to your school and learn how to construct your sentences/spelling. If you're USC why were you removed at POE? You won't have any problem with immigration if you are a citizen, am I right ?This is the reason why you were deported because you're a pathological liar. And you're begging for answers here thinking you can plan another modus operandi. We have so many illegal immigrants already, we don't need another criminal exported from the phils. I know you are a filipino and removed expeditiously from POE because of criminal activity.Get lost! just stay where you are.

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