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Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: F1 student with I20 n visa both expired

  1. #1
    Guest
    hi all, what are the options of a student here in the US whose student visa is expired, I20 is expiring soon ? any options to change status ? what if he marries a GC holder ? what if he stays in US even after his I20 expires ? what are the odds of getting caught and then the consequences of that ? PLEASE HELP SOON ! thnx in advance!!! also, please give detailed reply.

  2. #2
    Guest
    hi all, what are the options of a student here in the US whose student visa is expired, I20 is expiring soon ? any options to change status ? what if he marries a GC holder ? what if he stays in US even after his I20 expires ? what are the odds of getting caught and then the consequences of that ? PLEASE HELP SOON ! thnx in advance!!! also, please give detailed reply.

  3. #3
    Guest
    Even if your F1 visa expires but your I-20 is extended or renewed, you can attend school. You may not be able to travel other countries and come back once, though. Even if you get married to a greencard holder, you need to maintain a status with other type of visa such as H1b. The whole process of getting a greencard may take 5-6 years. However, getting married to a US citizen is different. Waiting time is a lot less. You may take a look at the BCIS priority dates. http://www.ilw.com/immigrants/govtti...te-family.shtm

  4. #4
    In general terms, do not fall out of status! If you are here illegally, this will dramatically reduce your immigration options and may lead to long bars to re-entry, should you ever leave the United States. Please contact me at: http://www.us-immigration-visas.com for more specific advice (I am an attorney).

  5. #5
    A visa is issued by the US State Department. It is used for entry into the US. Admission is granted by the US Department of Homeland Security. Length of admission is determined by the BCBP inspector based on the type of visa.

    Example: For students admission is for as long as they remain in a valid course of study plus a year of employment. So, a student can get an F1 visa valid for only four months, but come to the US and go to a year of high school, four years of undergrad, two more years for a masters, followed by three more for a doctorate. Then also apply for OPT and work for an additional year. 11 years in the US with a four month visa. The reverse does not work. A tourist can get a visa valid for ten years, but admission is limited to six months. Don't try to stay in the US for 10 years.

    The I-20 is filed out by the school based on the projected course of study. Students can change the course of study (change major, change degree, change school) and get a new I-20. So do you mean that a student's duration of status is ending? (He got a PhD and his year of OPT is almost up)

    Any one in lawful status can apply to change status. A student can apply for another nonimmigrant visa (I-539 to change to tourist) or be petitioned for a nonimmigrant visa (I-129 for employment)

    A nonimmigrant can marry a lawful permanent resident, but there is no immediate benefit. Currently it takes about five years for an I-130 petition filed by an LPR to result in an immigrant visa. Adjustment is possible only if the nonimmigrant stays in status or the LPR becomes a citizen. Consular processing is possible, but the 3-10 year bar applies.

    The odds are no longer good for a student who loses status since the schools now report the student's information directly to DHS. Special Agents from BICE showed up on an acquaintance's doorstep two days after she was reported through SEVIS.

    Detailed enough?

    The Grand Poo-Bah
    Lord Chief Justice, Master of the Buckhounds and Groom of the Back Stairs

  6. #6
    Lord Chief Justice, Master of the Buckho = Sammy

    hahahahahahahahahaha

  7. #7
    SEVIS : New Form for Students / Exchange Visitors
    _________________________________________________

    The Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (BCBP) has developed a new form, Form I-515A, to be used by students (F or M) and exchange visitors (J-1) seeking to enter the United States without properly endorsed documents. Schools had a deadline of August 1, 2003 to comply with the requirements of the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). The requirement also applied to J-1 exchange visitor program sponsors. However, some schools and, apparently, exchange visitor programs were unable to meet this deadline. One of the urgent problems created by this non-compliance is that the schools and program sponsors are not able to issue the SEVIS certified documents (I-20s for F and M students or DS-2019 for exchange visitors) required for entry to the U.S. The Form I-515A, Notice to Student or Exchange Visitor, is designed to address this problem. The Form bears a notice advising the student or exchange visitor that her/his admission to the U.S. is limited to 30 days, because of the lack of required SEVIS documentation. Presumably, these forms will be provided at the POE to students or exchange visitors who seek to enter without the SEVIS certified documents. The individuals must submit Form I-515A and the SEVIS certified documents within 30 days of entry to an address specified on the form. The one-page form has standard instructions for new students, returning students, exchange visitors, and dependents. It states that, if the proper documentation is submitted within the 30 days, the individuals will receive evidence of their student or exchange visitor status.

    The flexibility reflected in this new procedure is favorable for students and exchange visitors who need to complete their programs and for the schools and universities depending on the revenue of the substantially higher out-of-state tuition fees paid by foreign students. Let's hope that the 30-day requirement is realistic and that the schools and exchange visitor program staff are able to meet this extended deadline. The evidence of status will need to reach these students or exchange visitors in a timely manner after BCBP receives the SEVIS certified documents, to ensure that students or exchange visitors are able to demonstrate evidence of valid legal status in the U.S. to any law enforcement officials who request it of them.

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