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  • Bush will propose plan on illegals

    http://www.washtimes.com/national/20...4526-3019r.htm

    President Bush tomorrow will propose sweeping changes to U.S. immigration policy that would allow a portion of the 8 million illegal aliens in the country to move toward legal status without penalty, a plan sure to meet strong resistance from Republicans on Capitol Hill.
    Under the proposal, which will come just days before Mr. Bush meets on the issue with Mexican President Vicente Fox in Monterrey, illegal aliens from Mexico and possibly other countries who pay Social Security taxes but provide false identification numbers would be allowed to collect benefits.
    "The president has long talked about the importance of having an immigration policy that matches willing workers with willing employers," said White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan yesterday. "It's important for America to be a welcoming society. We are a nation of immigrants, and we're better for it."
    Detractors on Capitol Hill, even those inclined to support most administration initiatives, question the wisdom of the immigration-reform proposal.
    "When does [it] become 'adjusted work status' and when does it become amnesty for illegal immigrants?" said an aide to a senior conservative House Republican. "Surely, something has to be done, but creating an adjusted legal status for people here illegally has not gotten much traction.
    "There are some fairly deep divisions among Republicans on this," the aide said, predicting that the president's plan would be received rather cooly.
    The changes in immigration law proposed by the president have long been advocated by Mr. Fox, whose close relationship with Mr. Bush has been strained since border security efforts were beefed up after the September 11 attacks and since Mexico refused to support the U.S.-led war in Iraq.
    Mr. Fox described the plan last month as a provision that would allow Mexicans "to go and come each year as many times as they want, without problems, so that they can work with documents in the United States."
    Mr. Bush's plan will be introduced officially just five days before a special Jan. 12-14 Summit of the Americas, and is nearly identical to a bill introduced in July by Arizona Republican Reps. Jeff Flake and Jim Kolbe, and Sen. John McCain.
    That bill has garnered seven co-sponsors in the House and one co-sponsor in the Senate.
    Mr. Flake said he's "very excited to hear" that the president endorses the general thrust of their bill, and thinks Mr. Bush has the political clout to win over reluctant Republicans.
    "We've known all along that in order to move anything in an election year, you need presidential leadership, and it sounds like [the White House] is prepared to move," Mr. Flake said yesterday.
    Mr. McClellan said the president's plan will address the concerns many Republicans have over securing the country's borders.
    "In the post-September 11th time frame we have gone to extraordinary steps to strengthen our border security and make America more secure," Mr. McClellan said, stressing that the borders can be secure at the same time that immigration policy addresses "an economic need that exists."
    With this announcement, Mr. Bush will make immigration reform the first significant policy issue of 2004, a presidential election year.
    The aide to the House conservative said the president might be picking the wrong issue to kick off the campaign season.
    "This isn't the most unifying Republican policy that the White House could have unveiled," the aide said, adding that the final result from Congress "” if anything is passed at all "” is not likely to mirror the president's plan and is likely to be changed significantly by legislators.
    "The White House and Congress will really have to flesh a lot of these details out if it's going to be appealing to conservatives," the aide said. "There is a lot of concern that we aren't doing all that we need to be doing for border security."
    Mr. Flake said the plan, if it reflects the bill the president co-sponsored in the summer, actually would reduce the number of migrant workers who decide to remain in the country.
    The average stay of a Mexican migrant worker is nine years, Mr. Flake said, adding that in the 1980s, when border patrols were more lax, the average stay was a little more than two years.
    "Right now, we have no clue who is here, how long they've been here or when they are supposed to go home," Mr. Flake said. "If you have a legal program for willing workers to be matched with willing employers, then you can put people through ports of entry" rather than have them spill over the border with Mexico.
    Mr. Flake said Congress is unlikely to endorse any plan unless, like his, it punishes those who would use the program as a quick path to legal residency status.
    The bill Mr. Flake, Mr. McCain and Mr. Kolbe endorse would impose a fine of $1,500 on those who attempted to exploit the new law, and force them to wait longer than normal to gain legal residency status.
    "Our plan is not amnesty, and I don't think the president's is either," Mr. Flake said. "Once people recognize that is the case, you'll see a lot more support for it."

  • #2
    http://www.washtimes.com/national/20...4526-3019r.htm

    President Bush tomorrow will propose sweeping changes to U.S. immigration policy that would allow a portion of the 8 million illegal aliens in the country to move toward legal status without penalty, a plan sure to meet strong resistance from Republicans on Capitol Hill.
    Under the proposal, which will come just days before Mr. Bush meets on the issue with Mexican President Vicente Fox in Monterrey, illegal aliens from Mexico and possibly other countries who pay Social Security taxes but provide false identification numbers would be allowed to collect benefits.
    "The president has long talked about the importance of having an immigration policy that matches willing workers with willing employers," said White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan yesterday. "It's important for America to be a welcoming society. We are a nation of immigrants, and we're better for it."
    Detractors on Capitol Hill, even those inclined to support most administration initiatives, question the wisdom of the immigration-reform proposal.
    "When does [it] become 'adjusted work status' and when does it become amnesty for illegal immigrants?" said an aide to a senior conservative House Republican. "Surely, something has to be done, but creating an adjusted legal status for people here illegally has not gotten much traction.
    "There are some fairly deep divisions among Republicans on this," the aide said, predicting that the president's plan would be received rather cooly.
    The changes in immigration law proposed by the president have long been advocated by Mr. Fox, whose close relationship with Mr. Bush has been strained since border security efforts were beefed up after the September 11 attacks and since Mexico refused to support the U.S.-led war in Iraq.
    Mr. Fox described the plan last month as a provision that would allow Mexicans "to go and come each year as many times as they want, without problems, so that they can work with documents in the United States."
    Mr. Bush's plan will be introduced officially just five days before a special Jan. 12-14 Summit of the Americas, and is nearly identical to a bill introduced in July by Arizona Republican Reps. Jeff Flake and Jim Kolbe, and Sen. John McCain.
    That bill has garnered seven co-sponsors in the House and one co-sponsor in the Senate.
    Mr. Flake said he's "very excited to hear" that the president endorses the general thrust of their bill, and thinks Mr. Bush has the political clout to win over reluctant Republicans.
    "We've known all along that in order to move anything in an election year, you need presidential leadership, and it sounds like [the White House] is prepared to move," Mr. Flake said yesterday.
    Mr. McClellan said the president's plan will address the concerns many Republicans have over securing the country's borders.
    "In the post-September 11th time frame we have gone to extraordinary steps to strengthen our border security and make America more secure," Mr. McClellan said, stressing that the borders can be secure at the same time that immigration policy addresses "an economic need that exists."
    With this announcement, Mr. Bush will make immigration reform the first significant policy issue of 2004, a presidential election year.
    The aide to the House conservative said the president might be picking the wrong issue to kick off the campaign season.
    "This isn't the most unifying Republican policy that the White House could have unveiled," the aide said, adding that the final result from Congress "” if anything is passed at all "” is not likely to mirror the president's plan and is likely to be changed significantly by legislators.
    "The White House and Congress will really have to flesh a lot of these details out if it's going to be appealing to conservatives," the aide said. "There is a lot of concern that we aren't doing all that we need to be doing for border security."
    Mr. Flake said the plan, if it reflects the bill the president co-sponsored in the summer, actually would reduce the number of migrant workers who decide to remain in the country.
    The average stay of a Mexican migrant worker is nine years, Mr. Flake said, adding that in the 1980s, when border patrols were more lax, the average stay was a little more than two years.
    "Right now, we have no clue who is here, how long they've been here or when they are supposed to go home," Mr. Flake said. "If you have a legal program for willing workers to be matched with willing employers, then you can put people through ports of entry" rather than have them spill over the border with Mexico.
    Mr. Flake said Congress is unlikely to endorse any plan unless, like his, it punishes those who would use the program as a quick path to legal residency status.
    The bill Mr. Flake, Mr. McCain and Mr. Kolbe endorse would impose a fine of $1,500 on those who attempted to exploit the new law, and force them to wait longer than normal to gain legal residency status.
    "Our plan is not amnesty, and I don't think the president's is either," Mr. Flake said. "Once people recognize that is the case, you'll see a lot more support for it."

    Comment


    • #3
      President Bush tomorrow will propose sweeping changes to U.S. immigration policy that would allow a portion of the 8 million illegal aliens in the country to move toward legal status without penalty, a plan sure to meet strong resistance from Republicans on Capitol Hill.
      Under the proposal, which will come just days before Mr. Bush meets on the issue with Mexican President Vicente Fox in Monterrey, illegal aliens from Mexico and possibly other countries who pay Social Security taxes but provide false identification numbers would be allowed to collect benefits.
      "The president has long talked about the importance of having an immigration policy that matches willing workers with willing employers," said White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan yesterday. "It's important for America to be a welcoming society. We are a nation of immigrants, and we're better for it."
      Detractors on Capitol Hill, even those inclined to support most administration initiatives, question the wisdom of the immigration-reform proposal.
      "When does [it] become 'adjusted work status' and when does it become amnesty for illegal immigrants?" said an aide to a senior conservative House Republican. "Surely, something has to be done, but creating an adjusted legal status for people here illegally has not gotten much traction.
      "There are some fairly deep divisions among Republicans on this," the aide said, predicting that the president's plan would be received rather cooly.
      The changes in immigration law proposed by the president have long been advocated by Mr. Fox, whose close relationship with Mr. Bush has been strained since border security efforts were beefed up after the September 11 attacks and since Mexico refused to support the U.S.-led war in Iraq.
      Mr. Fox described the plan last month as a provision that would allow Mexicans "to go and come each year as many times as they want, without problems, so that they can work with documents in the United States."
      Mr. Bush's plan will be introduced officially just five days before a special Jan. 12-14 Summit of the Americas, and is nearly identical to a bill introduced in July by Arizona Republican Reps. Jeff Flake and Jim Kolbe, and Sen. John McCain.
      That bill has garnered seven co-sponsors in the House and one co-sponsor in the Senate.
      Mr. Flake said he's "very excited to hear" that the president endorses the general thrust of their bill, and thinks Mr. Bush has the political clout to win over reluctant Republicans.
      "We've known all along that in order to move anything in an election year, you need presidential leadership, and it sounds like [the White House] is prepared to move," Mr. Flake said yesterday.
      Mr. McClellan said the president's plan will address the concerns many Republicans have over securing the country's borders.
      "In the post-September 11th time frame we have gone to extraordinary steps to strengthen our border security and make America more secure," Mr. McClellan said, stressing that the borders can be secure at the same time that immigration policy addresses "an economic need that exists."
      With this announcement, Mr. Bush will make immigration reform the first significant policy issue of 2004, a presidential election year.
      The aide to the House conservative said the president might be picking the wrong issue to kick off the campaign season.
      "This isn't the most unifying Republican policy that the White House could have unveiled," the aide said, adding that the final result from Congress "” if anything is passed at all "” is not likely to mirror the president's plan and is likely to be changed significantly by legislators.
      "The White House and Congress will really have to flesh a lot of these details out if it's going to be appealing to conservatives," the aide said. "There is a lot of concern that we aren't doing all that we need to be doing for border security."
      Mr. Flake said the plan, if it reflects the bill the president co-sponsored in the summer, actually would reduce the number of migrant workers who decide to remain in the country.
      The average stay of a Mexican migrant worker is nine years, Mr. Flake said, adding that in the 1980s, when border patrols were more lax, the average stay was a little more than two years.
      "Right now, we have no clue who is here, how long they've been here or when they are supposed to go home," Mr. Flake said. "If you have a legal program for willing workers to be matched with willing employers, then you can put people through ports of entry" rather than have them spill over the border with Mexico.
      Mr. Flake said Congress is unlikely to endorse any plan unless, like his, it punishes those who would use the program as a quick path to legal residency status.
      The bill Mr. Flake, Mr. McCain and Mr. Kolbe endorse would impose a fine of $1,500 on those who attempted to exploit the new law, and force them to wait longer than normal to gain legal residency status.
      "Our plan is not amnesty, and I don't think the president's is either," Mr. Flake said. "Once people recognize that is the case, you'll see a lot more support for it."

      Comment


      • #4
        This is not going to happen! If it will, I don't think you should be included (do I remember correctly you posting earlier that you'd be teaching your children to hate America!?)

        Comment


        • #5
          Bush is doing this because VOTE OF IMMIGRANTS AND their relatives TO GAIN THE POWER.

          IT IS PURE ENCOURAGEMENT TO GET IN AMERICA
          ILLEGALLY

          WHERE IS THE JOBS?????????????/
          PURE POLITICS'!!!!!!!
          LET US SEE WHAT HAPPEN.
          IS IT STORY GIMMICK

          I AM LEGAL IMMIGRANT .I DONOT ENCOURAGE
          TO GET IN AMERICA
          ILLEGALLY.
          GOD BLESS AMERICA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

          uj

          Comment


          • #6
            Good for them with certian precaution of course ...

            Comment


            • #7
              Bush's plan, as reported in the Washington Post, would give illegal aliens a work visa good for only 3 years, after which they would be required to leave. They would get no preferential treatment in applying for green cards, and would have to meet sponsorship and income requirements. Most would not be able to. Furthermore, there are only 5,000 green cards available for unskilled workers, not to mention the processing backlogs for all visas and naturalization that this program would create. Bush also promises strict enforcement against overstays.

              In other words, it's your basic guest worker program. Workers haven't signed on to other guest worker programs such as H2 because it gives government a record to trace them with if they overstay. With this plan, either workers wouldn't sign on, or they'd sign on, overstay, and end up illegal again.

              Comment


              • #8
                How about high educated professionals? Will they be able to get this new type of visa and work in their profession other than low skilled jobs?

                Comment


                • #9
                  The program would be open to both legal and illegal immigrants, so long as those without papers could prove they were working in the United States as of the date the new policy becomes law.

                  As you see even legal aliens will be allowed to apply.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Melanie--the plan calls for being able to show that no Americans are available to do the job, i.e., professionals would have to meet the labor test. The visa would be given to illegals who are in a job, on the assumption that they're working because no Americans are available. However, changing jobs/careers may well be another matter. Not to mention, of course, that for many professions, you'd still have to meet licensing/certification requirements.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      oh god could this be abused. I could make a job opening of "personal early morning back massager" for me. No one would apply, i'd have my illegal friend "apply" for it. I'd write some stupid letter. He'd get his GC, and then go off and get a real job.

                      Yeah real secure system there.

                      -= nav =-

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You're right--labor attestation and certification are already being abused, in the H1-B program. Which is why I think Bush's new "guest worker" program is a cynical political ploy as well. The H1-B program was originally intended to bring in the best and brightest skilled workers temporarily to industries with employment shortages and send them home after 6 years. Over the years, employers got hooked on cheaper labor, and now we get primarily mediocre workers who are indentured to their employer if they want a green card. The labor rules do not protect American workers--they only apply to companies with 50 or more employees with more than 15 percent of their workforce as H1-Bs. American workers have actually had to train their foreign replacements--so much for "protections". The GAO found a lot of fraud by both employers and employees as well. The dot.com bust sent many home, but employers still claim they need a higher cap to "get ready" for the coming economic recovery. We're also stuck with many H1-Bs who were supposed to go home and didn't--they're now in Melanie's situation. And many green card holders who are competing with citizens for the jobs that remain. In fact, many employers now prefer the L-1 program because there is no labor certification and no cap. Basically if the economy's good employers claim to need foreign workers, and if it's bad they claim to need them as well.

                        All in all, the H1-B program, with all its flaws, sounds a lot like Bush's "new" plan for unskilled labor.

                        By the way--the H1-B program brought in several hundred thousand workers primarily from India and China. Many got sponsored for green cards, but many didn't and many are still waiting, because there are simply not enough green cards available. Plus, the feds can't handle processing that many new applications, on top of regular immigration duties. Now, Bush wants to "legalize" 8-12 million illegals, as well as bring in "guest workers", when there are only 140,000 green cards available per year. Congress would have to grossly increase that just to handle beneficiaries of Bush's program--and guess what would happen to legal immigrants in the meantime. Plus, there's the little matter of needing a sponsor and meeting the income requirements. How is someone earning not much more than minimum wage going to be able to sponsor himself and his family at above the poverty level to qualify for a GC? Bush's plan also requires that they be able to support themselves and their families during the temporary visa. So, no use of means-tested programs allowed, no seasonal layoffs, etc. These guys are not likely to be able to do that. Are they going to get kicked out of the country? Bush claims he'll enforce the rules, but then, somehow that doesn't seem to happen, does it?

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