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  • Iran: We'll Work With U.N. Nuclear Agency

    By ALI AKBAR DAREINI, Associated Press Writer

    TEHRAN, Iran - Iran will cooperate more with the U.N. nuclear watchdog, the country's atomic chief said Saturday, but he suggested Tehran will ignore one agency request by maintaining plans to enrich uranium "” a key step in making atomic bombs. Meanwhile, the head of the U.N. agency said in Jordan he was assured Saturday that Iran was "ready to cooperate fully." The United States suspects Iran is trying to build a nuclear bomb "” a charge Iran denies. Tehran says its nuclear operations are meant to provide electricity, particularly after oil reserves run dry.

    The International Atomic Energy Agency urged Iran last week to allow continued inspections of its suspect facilities and to desist from enriching nuclear fuel. On Saturday, Iran's nuclear chief, Gholamreza Aghazadeh, told reporters, "We will try to step up our cooperation with the IAEA. Our cooperation with the agency will be comprehensive and at a level acceptable to the agency." Asked whether Iran would heed the IAEA's call to stop efforts to enrich uranium, Aghazadeh said Iran will go ahead with its nuclear plans.

    "The IAEA has not asked us to stop plans to enrich uranium. It was the opinion of some countries, not the agency, to only delay shipment of materials to Natanz plant," he said. Natanz, which is about 200 miles south of Tehran, is where a centrifuge plant is being built. In Jordan, IAEA chief Mohamed ElBaradei said he was assured of Iran's full cooperation. ElBaradei was attending a meeting of business and political leaders on Mideast issues.

    "It would not be helpful at all if they did not have full transparency and full cooperation with the agency," ElBaradei told Associated Press Television News. "The more transparency they show, the more cooperation they show, the more confidence we can create within the international community about the peaceful nature of their program." Aghazadeh suggested Saturday he was standing behind earlier statements that Iran would not permit environmental sampling at "some locations" because it was "contrary to agreements signed (between Iran and the IAEA)."

    "We will continue any sort of cooperation with IAEA within the framework of regulations. It doesn't mean that we have adopted a new position toward IAEA," he said. Iran wants to control the whole fuel cycle, from mining uranium ore to enriching uranium at a centrifuge plant under construction in Natanz, central Iran. That site was inspected in February by ElBaradei. "It's part of our rights (to enrich uranium) and we will continue our activities under the umbrella of the IAEA. Currently, IAEA cameras have been installed at Natanz and the materials used there have been sealed," Aghazadeh said.

    IAEA experts inspect the plant monthly, he said. "It's the widest and most comprehensive supervision applied to any country," he said. Aghazadeh said the Europeans recognize "our peaceful nuclear activities." "But the U.S. position is different," he said. "Americans make some accusations against us without proving them and then try to make judgments on the basis of those accusations."

    The United States demanded the IAEA force Iran to open up its nuclear program. It also wanted Tehran declared in violation of the international Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, which would allow the issue to go before the U.N. Security Council for possible action. However, the IAEA stopped short of demanding Tehran accept unfettered inspections. Instead, it urged Iran to look "positively" at signing and ratifying a protocol that would enhance the agency's powers of inspection. The IAEA said it expected Iran "to grant the agency all access deemed necessary by the agency" to defuse suspicions Tehran has a clandestine nuclear weapons program.

    Iran, which claimed victory after Thursday's IAEA decisions, has said it will sign the inspections protocol if the IAEA provides it with advanced nuclear technology as a member state and a signatory to the nuclear treaty. "We are optimistic about signing the additional protocol ... we only want to know whether IAEA has fulfilled its obligations toward Iran after it has signed many treaties, including NPT," Aghazadeh said Saturday. "There are some ambiguities (over the additional protocol). We will discuss those issues with IAEA. But some issues must be cleared."



    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...d=540&ncid=716

  • #2
    By ALI AKBAR DAREINI, Associated Press Writer

    TEHRAN, Iran - Iran will cooperate more with the U.N. nuclear watchdog, the country's atomic chief said Saturday, but he suggested Tehran will ignore one agency request by maintaining plans to enrich uranium "” a key step in making atomic bombs. Meanwhile, the head of the U.N. agency said in Jordan he was assured Saturday that Iran was "ready to cooperate fully." The United States suspects Iran is trying to build a nuclear bomb "” a charge Iran denies. Tehran says its nuclear operations are meant to provide electricity, particularly after oil reserves run dry.

    The International Atomic Energy Agency urged Iran last week to allow continued inspections of its suspect facilities and to desist from enriching nuclear fuel. On Saturday, Iran's nuclear chief, Gholamreza Aghazadeh, told reporters, "We will try to step up our cooperation with the IAEA. Our cooperation with the agency will be comprehensive and at a level acceptable to the agency." Asked whether Iran would heed the IAEA's call to stop efforts to enrich uranium, Aghazadeh said Iran will go ahead with its nuclear plans.

    "The IAEA has not asked us to stop plans to enrich uranium. It was the opinion of some countries, not the agency, to only delay shipment of materials to Natanz plant," he said. Natanz, which is about 200 miles south of Tehran, is where a centrifuge plant is being built. In Jordan, IAEA chief Mohamed ElBaradei said he was assured of Iran's full cooperation. ElBaradei was attending a meeting of business and political leaders on Mideast issues.

    "It would not be helpful at all if they did not have full transparency and full cooperation with the agency," ElBaradei told Associated Press Television News. "The more transparency they show, the more cooperation they show, the more confidence we can create within the international community about the peaceful nature of their program." Aghazadeh suggested Saturday he was standing behind earlier statements that Iran would not permit environmental sampling at "some locations" because it was "contrary to agreements signed (between Iran and the IAEA)."

    "We will continue any sort of cooperation with IAEA within the framework of regulations. It doesn't mean that we have adopted a new position toward IAEA," he said. Iran wants to control the whole fuel cycle, from mining uranium ore to enriching uranium at a centrifuge plant under construction in Natanz, central Iran. That site was inspected in February by ElBaradei. "It's part of our rights (to enrich uranium) and we will continue our activities under the umbrella of the IAEA. Currently, IAEA cameras have been installed at Natanz and the materials used there have been sealed," Aghazadeh said.

    IAEA experts inspect the plant monthly, he said. "It's the widest and most comprehensive supervision applied to any country," he said. Aghazadeh said the Europeans recognize "our peaceful nuclear activities." "But the U.S. position is different," he said. "Americans make some accusations against us without proving them and then try to make judgments on the basis of those accusations."

    The United States demanded the IAEA force Iran to open up its nuclear program. It also wanted Tehran declared in violation of the international Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, which would allow the issue to go before the U.N. Security Council for possible action. However, the IAEA stopped short of demanding Tehran accept unfettered inspections. Instead, it urged Iran to look "positively" at signing and ratifying a protocol that would enhance the agency's powers of inspection. The IAEA said it expected Iran "to grant the agency all access deemed necessary by the agency" to defuse suspicions Tehran has a clandestine nuclear weapons program.

    Iran, which claimed victory after Thursday's IAEA decisions, has said it will sign the inspections protocol if the IAEA provides it with advanced nuclear technology as a member state and a signatory to the nuclear treaty. "We are optimistic about signing the additional protocol ... we only want to know whether IAEA has fulfilled its obligations toward Iran after it has signed many treaties, including NPT," Aghazadeh said Saturday. "There are some ambiguities (over the additional protocol). We will discuss those issues with IAEA. But some issues must be cleared."



    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...d=540&ncid=716

    Comment


    • #3
      What is going on in Iran? At first the recent clashes in that country seemed to be a straightforward struggle between Iranians who wanted reform and remodernization and mullahs seeking to keep the country on the Islamic fundamentalist course set in 1979 by the Ayatollah Khomeini. But the picture proved to be more complicated. Iran's students, whose predecessors a generation ago helped to topple Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and took Americans hostage, were agitating against not only Islamic conservatives but also the reformist government of President Mohammad Khatami who, as the students see it, is moving too slowly.

      As if that weren't hard enough to follow, enter the Americans. For the Bush administration, Iran remains where Mr. Bush put it last year, in the "axis of evil" alongside Iraq and North Korea. On Wednesday, as the International Atomic Energy Agency was pressing Iran to allow more intrusive inspections, the president warned that he and other world leaders would not tolerate nuclear weapons in Iran. As for the demonstrations in Iran, Mr. Bush warned Iranian authorities to treat protesters with "the utmost of respect." Although no evidence has emerged so far of involvement of the Central Intelligence Agency in the recent unrest in Iran, that country in the past was a happy hunting ground for the CIA. Its most famous tour de force there was the overthrow of Prime Minister Mohammed Mossadegh in 1953.

      If the Bush administration is actively involved in trying to bring about some kind of change in Iran, it needs to think very carefully about what exactly it is seeking. Prodding President Khatami to go faster on reforms and urging the Iranian government to open up its nuclear activities to fuller international inspection make sense. Encouraging Iran to descend into political chaos, with the students, the government and the mullahs scrapping over who sets the course, could be disastrous. Iran, a country of 67 million, borders on seven countries, including Iraq, Afghan-istan, Turkey and Pakistan. Modernization there is a positive development for a variety of reasons; the creation of substantial unrest is not.

      Comment


      • #4
        Powell Denies U.S. Preparing for Conflict with Iran
        _______________________________________________

        DEAD SEA, Jordan (Reuters) - Secretary of State Colin Powell on Sunday dismissed as "absolutely wrong" any suggestion that the United States was preparing to attack Iran. The United States accuses Iran of seeking nuclear weapons, supporting "terrorist organizations," and meddling in the affairs of neighboring Iraq, where U.S.-led troops have the toppled the government of president Saddam Hussein.

        Conservatives inside and outside the Bush administration have called for the United States to take a harder line toward Iran, which President Bush last year included in an "axis of evil" with North Korea and Iraq. But U.S. officials from Bush down have sought to play down the idea that the United States had any intention of going to war with Iran, despite the fact that some officials refuse to rule out conflict as a theoretical possibility. "We are against Iranian support of terrorist activities, against (a) nuclear weapons development program. We hope that the Iranians will not play an unhelpful role in our reconstruction efforts in Iraq," Powell said in response to a question at a World Economic Forum meeting in Jordan.

        "And we are watching what is happening within the country, the churning that's taking place within the population, and we have to provide encouragement and support to those who are seeking the right to speak out," Powell added, alluding to a recent wave of demonstrations against Islamic rule in Iran. "But for some to go beyond that and say the United States is getting ready for something aggressive or looking for another place to have a conflict, it is absolutely wrong," he said. "We are being very careful in our words and our actions."

        On Friday, John Bolton, a leading member of the Bush administration, said military action against Iran was one among an array of possibilities and relatively low down the agenda. Powell and Bush have voiced support for Iranian students leading peaceful demonstrations in the past two weeks, triggering accusations from Tehran that Washington was interfering in its internal affairs. "We encourage the demonstrations not as a way of fomenting trouble but to say, people should be free to speak out," Powell said. Iranian student leaders said hundreds of their colleagues had been arrested after recent protests and warned that the crackdown could make them adopt more radical and violent methods.



        http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...sa_powell_dc_2

        Comment


        • #5
          Say 'No' To The War On Iran!

          Comment


          • #6
            Who said we're going to war with Iran?!

            Comment


            • #7
              Yea, who said that?

              Comment


              • #8
                Kenny here...

                Comment


                • #9
                  the previous posting was not me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Kissing Kenny...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What about you?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        LOLA WANTS TO HAVE KENNYS CUM IN HER ***!!!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          MY CUM IS IN HER MOUTH AND ***!!!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Oh my Gawd, this mental again,,

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Four thousand arrested during Iran unrest, 2,000 still being held
                              _______________________________________________

                              TEHRAN (AFP) - Iran's security forces made 4,000 arrests during the recent wave of anti-regime protests and unrest, with half of that number still being held, the Islamic republic's prosecutor general revealed.


                              AFP/File Photo



                              "In total, 4,000 people were arrested across the country, and 40 percent of those arrested were immediately freed," Ayatollah Abdolnabi Namazi was quoted as saying Friday by the student news agency ISNA and semi-official news agency ILNA.


                              "Currently there are 2,000 people who are still in prison, among whom there are not many students," the ayatollah added, giving the first official figures for the number of arrests across the country.


                              In Tehran -- which was the epicenter of the June 10-20 demonstrations -- he said 800 people were arrested.


                              The protests began after a small student rally against the privatisation of some university facilities snowballed into anti-regime protests around Tehran university, sparking severe clashes between protestors and Islamist vigilantes.


                              The protests -- the most serious since the July 9, 1999 clashes in Tehran -- also spread across the country and were marked by the unprecedented shouting of virulent slogans against Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.


                              The protests fizzled out after a tough crackdown, and after scores of people were seriously injured and hundreds detained. One demonstrator died in the southern city of Shiraz in circumstances that remain unclear.


                              Namazi was also quoted as confirming that Iran's authorities have banned students from commemorating next month the 1999 unrest, which saw at least one student die in riots that followed a heavy-handed police raid on a Tehran university dormitory. He said no events would be permitted on or off campus.


                              The tough crackdown has sparked widespread anger among students, and has placed yet more pressure on embattled reformist President Mohammad Khatami (news - web sites) -- who has defended the right to protest but appears to wield little or no influence over the security forces, judiciary or intelligence service.


                              In an open letter received Friday, a group of 106 prominent student activists called on Khatami to step in to defend the right to protest or else resign.


                              "We ask you to prevent an uproar before it is too late by finding a good way forward. Otherwise, you must act bravely by resigning from your post so as not to legitimise the policy of repression," Khatami was told.


                              Also Friday, a prominent cleric and politician said in a sermon that the unrest was part of an alleged United States plot to topple the nearly 25-year-old regime, and hence those detained in the unrest should be shown little mercy.


                              "This chaos was predictable, as after all the Americans have been saying that they support the overthrow of the regime," Ayatollah Ahmad Jannati, a member of the Guardians Council legislative oversight body, told worshippers at Friday prayers in Tehran.


                              "Those who were arrested should be treated according to the law. There were a number of them who were fooled, but even they should also pay the price. This is no joke," he added, describing the protestors as "mercenaries, thieves, smugglers, hooligans and Savaki" -- the ousted shah's notorious secret police.


                              He also took aim at the US President George W. Bush (news - web sites) and British Prime Minister Tony Blair (news - web sites).


                              "The United States should understand that this regime is not a regime to be toppled by chaos. Wicked Bush and Blair should understand that here, they are facing a regime whose people are ready to sacrifice their lives," he warned.


                              Meanwhile, Tehran's hardline chief prosecutor Saeed Mortazavi told ISNA that an undisclosed number of newspapers were also being investigated for their alleged role in the mid-June unrest.





                              "Certain newspapers that played a negative role by causing problems are under investigation," said Mortazavi, who is best known for his closing down of scores of pro-reform newspapers in his previous job as the head of Tehran's press court. He also alleged that "certain deputies" in the Iranian parliament also played a role in the unrest, but did not say if they too were facing legal action.

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