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Any risks by applying for legalization now while waiting for 245i extension or new HR440 bill to pass?

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  • Any risks by applying for legalization now while waiting for 245i extension or new HR440 bill to pass?

    In an earlier post Porfa mentioned that illegals waiting for 245i to be reinstated should apply for legalization of status now, because there is also a possibility of a new HR440 bill to pass which would allow illegal immigrants that have been here for 5 years to change their status.
    My question is.. would the alien risk being deported if papers were submitted stating that he arrived in the US without a legal visa?
    Also, to begin the application process, does one just submit I-130, etc, as in regular procedure?
    My husband came here 5.5 years ago illegaly, and I am a USC by birth.
    Thanks anyone in advance for clarifying this for me.

  • #2
    In an earlier post Porfa mentioned that illegals waiting for 245i to be reinstated should apply for legalization of status now, because there is also a possibility of a new HR440 bill to pass which would allow illegal immigrants that have been here for 5 years to change their status.
    My question is.. would the alien risk being deported if papers were submitted stating that he arrived in the US without a legal visa?
    Also, to begin the application process, does one just submit I-130, etc, as in regular procedure?
    My husband came here 5.5 years ago illegaly, and I am a USC by birth.
    Thanks anyone in advance for clarifying this for me.

    Comment


    • #3
      I am in the same situation as you. I filed an I-130 in March for my husband. I put the whole truth on it and they haven't shown up at our door to deport him yet. I was really worried when I first submitted it, but don't think they have the money or the man-power to pursue every illegal alien here. My husband has never had any brushes with the law and we pretty much mind our own business, so I think we're pretty safe in our small town. If you are a US citizen, then your husband is eventually going to get his green card, even if it takes years, so they would be wasting money to bother with deporting him. Of course, I'm just talking from personal experience. Almost everyone we know is aware of my husbands illegal status and still nothing has happened.

      Comment


      • #4
        So you think your safe aiding a person who has broken US law ? We shall see, you are gulity of a felnoy, but what do you care as long as it benfits you but not your country, check the content of your charcter, what do you see?

        http://www.sun-sentinel.com/template...p02aug02.story
        Controversial pilot program to enforce federal immigration law nets 165 arrests



        By Tanya Weinberg
        Staff Writer

        August 2, 2003

        In the year since 35 Florida police officers were trained in a controversial pilot program to enforce federal immigration law, they have made more than 165 arrests, and officials here and in other states want to expand the program.

        "We've learned a lot through this, so that other states have been looking at us as an example," said Jim Sewell, assistant commissioner of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

        Los Angeles County has inquired about deputizing officers to enforce immigration law, said Chris Bentley, spokesman for the federal Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Officials in Alabama hope the 25 officers they want trained would help the few federal agents in the state enforce immigration violations, said Dorris Teague, spokeswoman for the Alabama Department of Public Safety.

        The Florida officers are assigned among the state's seven regional domestic security task forces. Seven law enforcement agencies in South Florida have one officer each trained and deputized in the program. Federal officials said the cost of the six-week training is not available, but local agencies pay the officers' salaries and benefits.

        Under the pilot program, the officers are federally deputized and their authorization is limited to domestic security cases. Programs on the horizon make no such restriction, however, as some lawmakers and immigrant-control advocates call for the hundreds of thousands of state and local police officers to join the 2,000 federal immigration agents in reining in the estimated 8 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States. FDLE says Florida has no interest in such widespread applications.

        But a bill pending in Congress could pave the way for more state-federal agreements and strip police agencies of federal funding if they fail to report immigration violations to federal authorities. Six congressmen from central and northern Florida have signed on as co-sponsors to the Clear Law Enforcement for Criminal Alien Removal Act of 2003, a trend that immigrant advocates see as dangerous.

        Some immigrant and civil rights advocates say domestic security is already being interpreted too broadly. Critics say that further expanding the role of local police in immigration enforcement would cause public safety to deteriorate by discouraging many immigrants from reporting crime.

        "It's part of a circle of all these things happening at the same time that are putting more and more pressure on the immigrant community," said David Skovholt, coordinator of the Miami-based Florida Immigrant Coalition. "They are pushing people further into the shadows and out of the system."

        So far, the officers have participated in federally organized sweeps of undocumented workers at airports and seaports, checked the immigration status of groups of Middle Easterners and helped bust a phony-document ring in the Naples area, Sewell said.

        But many tips these specially trained officers investigate amount to nothing.

        "Some innocent people who have nothing to do with domestic security who happen to get caught up in some investigation might be deported," Skovholt said. "We were told by FDLE before this program started that this program would target terrorists."

        FDLE says that officers have no choice but to take seriously a caller's suspicion of terrorism.

        "Especially after 9-11, pretty much anything could be domestic security," said Amos Rojas Jr., regional director for FDLE in South Florida. "A guy standing outside a water plant taking pictures could be seen as a threat, someone signing up to take flying lessons. It's really open to the imagination."

        Faced with staffing problems, Hollywood Police Department Capt. Allen Siegel recently called his federally deputized detective back to narcotics duty instead of reporting full-time to an immigration supervisor.

        "From my understanding of it, most of these investigations were kind of closed out without any major enforcement action taken, which is one of the reasons I made the decision he would better serve the Hollywood department here and we would have him assist on a part-time basis as needed," Siegel said.

        Tanya Weinberg can be reached at tweinberg@sun-sentinel.com or 305-810-5029.
        Copyright © 2003, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

        Comment


        • #5
          So Acelaw, what do you want? Do you want me to call BCIS and beg them to come and take my husband away because he is a "criminal" for living with me in my country? Give me a break. So, you would do that to your spouse? The person you love and the person you know has never done anything wrong besides moving to your country? If you would do that, than it is YOU, my friend, who needs to look in the mirror. Applying for the legalization of one's spouse is NOT a felony. It is also perfectly legal for two unmarried people of the opposite *** to get married in any state of this country. I have not done anything illegal by attempting to legalize my husband's situation. I am trying to make him legal!! Isn't that what people like you want? You claim that you aren't anti-immigrant, you are only anti illegal immigrant. Well, if my husband becomes legal, then what will the problem be? I'll tell you what. You ARE anti-immigrant, or to be a little more specific, you, Acelaw, are obviously anti-Mexican!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Chipmunk
            
            Member
             posted July 30, 2003 09:15 PM July 30, 2003 09:15 PM
            Not believing that *** marriages are morally acceptable does not constitute hate. I do not believe that *** marriages are acceptable either, but I am not hateful towards


            What a hypocrite your are, its OK for you to not agree with something and its not hate for you, only me.

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