Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pope Urges Prayers for Rain in Europe

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pope Urges Prayers for Rain in Europe

    CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy - Pope John Paul II urged people to pray for rain Sunday to ease Europe's seemingly relentless heat wave and expressed worry about the wildfires devouring much of the continent's woodlands. "Vast fires have developed in these days in several nations in Europe, with particular intensity in Portugal, sparking deaths and enormous danger to the environment," the pope told a crowd of pilgrims and tourists in the courtyard of his summer residence in the hills outside of Rome. "It is a worrisome emergency which, fed by persistent drought as well as human responsibility, puts at risk the environmental heritage, a precious good for entire humanity," the pope said. "I invite all to join in my prayers for the victims of this calamity, and I exhort all to raise to the Lord fervent entreaties so that he may grant the relief of rain to the thirsty earth," John Paul said.

    Some 40 deaths, including victims of the blazes, have been blamed on the combination of weeks of drought and temperatures hitting the low 100s Fahrenheit. Authorities have blamed arson and human carelessness for at least some of the blazes. In Italy, at least two suspects have been questioned in the last few days about suspicious fires. Besides Italy and Portugal, Spain, Croatia, France, Greece, the Netherlands and Croatia have been plagued by wildfires. Some weather experts have predicted that the heat wave will probably last until September. The pope is spending several weeks in the papal palace in Castel Gandolfo, a lakeside town in the Alban Hills south-east of Rome, an area generally cooler than the capital in summer.

    Parkinson's disease has made it difficult for the once robust pontiff to move around, and John Paul, 83, no longer takes the mountain hikes that used to be the highlight of his vacations.



    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...d=518&ncid=716

  • #2
    CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy - Pope John Paul II urged people to pray for rain Sunday to ease Europe's seemingly relentless heat wave and expressed worry about the wildfires devouring much of the continent's woodlands. "Vast fires have developed in these days in several nations in Europe, with particular intensity in Portugal, sparking deaths and enormous danger to the environment," the pope told a crowd of pilgrims and tourists in the courtyard of his summer residence in the hills outside of Rome. "It is a worrisome emergency which, fed by persistent drought as well as human responsibility, puts at risk the environmental heritage, a precious good for entire humanity," the pope said. "I invite all to join in my prayers for the victims of this calamity, and I exhort all to raise to the Lord fervent entreaties so that he may grant the relief of rain to the thirsty earth," John Paul said.

    Some 40 deaths, including victims of the blazes, have been blamed on the combination of weeks of drought and temperatures hitting the low 100s Fahrenheit. Authorities have blamed arson and human carelessness for at least some of the blazes. In Italy, at least two suspects have been questioned in the last few days about suspicious fires. Besides Italy and Portugal, Spain, Croatia, France, Greece, the Netherlands and Croatia have been plagued by wildfires. Some weather experts have predicted that the heat wave will probably last until September. The pope is spending several weeks in the papal palace in Castel Gandolfo, a lakeside town in the Alban Hills south-east of Rome, an area generally cooler than the capital in summer.

    Parkinson's disease has made it difficult for the once robust pontiff to move around, and John Paul, 83, no longer takes the mountain hikes that used to be the highlight of his vacations.



    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...d=518&ncid=716

    Comment


    • #3
      Space cannibalism: A big galaxy eats a tiny one
      ________________________________________________

      THE ORBITING TELESCOPE captured the image of the gorging galaxy as part of a much larger picture of a long-tailed galaxy that has become known as the Tadpole. This photo was one of the first to be released last year after a new advanced camera was installed aboard Hubble. The Tadpole dominates the image, but the second-brightest object is a massive spiral galaxy seen in the lower left corner, with an apparent companion nearby that is seemingly linked to the bigger galaxy. U.S. and Australian astronomers were intrigued by this mismatched pair of cosmic objects, but the Hubble image alone was not enough to confirm that this was a case of a dominant galaxy feeding on a much smaller dwarf galaxy. To do this, they used the Keck Telescope in Hawaii, which was able to show plumes of stars streaming away from the dwarf galaxy's heart toward the big galaxy, the astronomers said in a statement. The galactic pair is located about 2 billion light-years from Earth. A light-year is about 6 trillion miles, the distance light travels in a year. Their findings were published Thursday in Science Express. The tiny galaxy is being ripped apart by the gravitational forces of the larger one, and the dwarf galaxy's stolen stars will wind up as part of a spherical halo surrounding the flattened disk of the larger spiral galaxy, the astronomers said.

      Comment


      • #4
        how about a rain dance too?

        Comment


        • #5
          Well, that would not be endorsed by Pope, Jos

          Comment


          • #6
            Internet Addiction: Ruining Lives?
            ___________________________________

            Spouses, Friends See It First, Suffer Most
            By Jeanie Lerche Davis
            Reviewed By Michael Smith, MD
            on Thursday, August 07, 2003
            WebMD Medical News



            Aug. 7, 2003 -- It's got people worried: Glassy-eyed millions are downloading, instant messaging, emailing -- and they're doing it 24/7. Hours and hours after logging on, they can't walk away. When does harmless Internet surfing cross into overuse, or -- as some say -- Internet addiction?

            Nathan A. Shapira, MD, PhD, a psychiatrist in the McKnight Brain Institute at the University of Florida in Gainesville, has been studying this social problem since 1997. His latest paper, published in the current issue of Depression and Anxiety, outlines theories about this phenomenon. When the computer age burgeoned two decades ago, researchers looked into computer and technology dependence. But they didn't find the same damage -- especially to relationships -- that Internet overuse seems to cause. In fact, psychiatrists are still trying to figure out what's going on -- and how best to treat the problem, he says. "It's disheartening," Shapira tells WebMD. "We have this wonderful, very prevalent technology, but no one really knows the effect it's having on us."

            It's no secret: Many people use the computer to satisfy, stir up excitement, release tension, or provide relief -- whether it involves *** or not, he writes. Surfing, chatting, playing interactive games -- that's where those long hours go. Make no mistake: Surfing has its upside, much like exercise or meditation, Shapira writes. "It's just that when Internet use becomes excessive, it can -- like other impulse disorders -- be distressing and disabling," he tells WebMD. There likely is a psychological dependence -- as happens with TV, exercise, ***, or gambling -- rather than a physiological dependence as with smoking and alcohol abuse, Shapira writes.

            In fact, Internet abuse often dovetails with another psychiatric problem. People with obsessive-compulsive disorder -- the same ones who compulsively gamble or shop -- may find the Internet an outlet, he adds. Depression seems to lead others to overuse, creating a viscous cycle fed by isolation. The problem is not likely to ebb, not any time soon, he says. "People get a rush from being on three computers at once, keeping different things going on each one. And as speed gets better, the problem will likely get worse. Speed is part of the enticement."

            If you've said it too many times, "Come to bed, it's 2 a.m.," you may be living with an Internet junkie. Here are symptoms of a serious problem:

            - They have a preoccupation in which the Internet becomes "irresistible."
            - Using the Internet for longer periods than planned. "They say they'll be off in an hour, but three hours later they're still at it," says Shapira.
            - Preoccupation causes significant problems in relationships, work, or other important areas of functioning.
            - They try to cut back but can't.
            - They have excessive thoughts about it.
            - They get a sense of tension or arousal before doing it, and get pleasure afterward -- much as kleptomaniacs feel after lifting something.
            - Their other responsibilities, such as paying the bills, get neglected.

            All this rings true for drug and alcohol addiction, too, says Kristin Kassaw, MD, associate director of the Baylor Psychiatric Clinic in Houston. "It would take something like a 12-step program to change the behavior," she tells WebMD. In fact, therapy does work to curb the problem, Shapira says. Cognitive behavioral therapy -- which involves learning how to deal with feelings that lead to excessive Internet use -- helps people control their urges and manage their time better, he says. Medications can help, too. "If depression or obsessive-compulsive disorder is involved, when the mood gets stabilized, it will have an affect on impulse control," he says. Loved ones are always the first to identify this problem -- those glued to the screen rarely recognize it in themselves, Shapira tells WebMD. "Interpersonal relationships are the first to suffer." If you're concerned about a family member or friend, talk to them about it and express concern about Internet addiction. Then help them find a psychologist, he advises.



            http://content.health.msn.com/conten...?printing=true

            Comment


            • #7
              *** = s e x

              Comment


              • #8
                You are suggesting Lambada that hardworker and Lena who posted unrelated stuff to immigration might suffer from Internet addiction, you know, coming here and posting for the h e l l of it?!

                Comment


                • #9
                  yea keep fantasizing Circuit

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    May God Save Pope From This Heat! LOL

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The government has approved the sale of a second pill to treat erectile dysfunction, setting the stage for a fierce battle with Viagra in the billion-dollar-plus impotence market. The new drug, Levitra, is in the same family as Viagra. Both work by targeting an enzyme important for maintaining an erection. The Food and Drug Administration approved Levitra Tuesday. Until now, the blue, diamond-shaped Viagra pills have been the only **** prescription drug available for an estimated 30 million American men who suffer some degree of impotence "” most of whom don't seek medical therapy.

                      Levitra, made by Bayer AG and marketed by GlaxoSmithKline, recently began selling in Europe. A third impotence pill "” Cialis, from Eli Lilly & Co. and Icos Corp. "” also has European approval and is expected to hit U.S. pharmacies later this year. All three drugs work in the same manner, and there have been no published studies directly comparing the pills to determine advantages of each. The FDA approved Levitra, known chemically as vardenafil, based on studies showing that men were on average five times more likely to achieve an erection suitable for intercourse when taking the pill compared with those given a dummy medicine. In studies of several thousand men, researchers reported that Viagra helped more than 70 percent improve their erections. Like Viagra, Levitra comes with some serious warnings that dramatically limit the number of men eligible to take it.

                      The FDA said Levitra should never be used by men who:

                      _ Take nitrate-containing drugs for heart conditions.
                      _ Take medicines called alpha blockers, such as Cardura, for high blood pressure or enlarged prostate. The combination could cause plummeting blood pressure and fainting.

                      FDA also said Levitra is not for patients with a rare heart condition known as QT prolongation because the drug could cause an abnormal heart beat. Nor is it for men who suffered a recent heart attack or stroke who have very low blood pressure or uncontrolled high blood pressure. For otherwise healthy men, Levitra's main side effects were headache, flushing and a stuffy nose. About 2 percent became dizzy. Men are advised to get a thorough physical exam before using Levitra for the first time, the FDA said. The manufacturer said Levitra would be on pharmacy shelves within a few weeks but refused to release the price. With the new competition, urologists expect a boom in direct-to-consumer advertising that might entice more men suffering from impotence to visit a doctor and check out their options. Sales of Viagra, which hit the market in 1998, totaled $1.7 billion last year. Even before it had competition, Pfizer Inc. made the pill one of the nation's most heavily promoted drugs, spending $101 million on marketing in 2001 alone. Bayer and Glaxo haven't detailed their marketing plans for Levitra yet, but they are beginning a three-year sponsorship deal with the National Football League reported to be worth about $18 million.


                      http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...potence_drug_4

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In fact the heat wave was very serious in Europe, particularly in France. The French funeral directors association said 10,416 people died during the first 3 weeks of August because of the heat wave. The French Interior Ministry has estimated the number of heat wave deaths would be "less than 10,000." City officials have organized temporary burials in paupers' graves to relieve pressure on their overburdened funeral services.

                        Jean-Paul Proust, chief of police for Paris, said the city would bury all corpses left unclaimed for 10 days according to the normal procedures for paupers. These corpses will not be buried in a common grave, as he denied a local press report that unclaimed bodies would be dumped into secret mass graves. Special concrete-lined graves would be marked, and families could have the caskets exhumed for a proper reburial elsewhere at a later time. The daily Le Parisien reported 50 corpses were buried this way in the paupers' section of a large cemetery in eastern Paris on Saturday and more were due to be interred on Sunday.

                        The heat wave showed the vulnerability of France's elderly. Paris Mayor Bertrand Delanoe defended the burial plan, saying the corpses could not remain in refrigerated morgue chambers indefinitely. The French government has come under increasing criticism for its handling of the crisis. Last week, Lucien Abenhaim, France's director general of health, stepped down amid calls for the resignation of his boss, Health Minister Jean-Francois Mattei. France, which normally has temperatures in the upper 20s Celsius (80s Fahrenheit) was hit with temperatures in the upper 30s C (90s to more than 100 F).

                        Comment



                        Working...
                        X