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C1/D visa query

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  • C1/D visa query

    Could someone please help with a C1/D visa question?
    I am an Australian aircrew member and hold a C1/D visa on my Australian passport. I am considering a job with a US company based in HI. They say that I can be employed by a US company, be paid in the states and live in HI on this C1/D visa. Does this sound right? I have no other US visas.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Could someone please help with a C1/D visa question?
    I am an Australian aircrew member and hold a C1/D visa on my Australian passport. I am considering a job with a US company based in HI. They say that I can be employed by a US company, be paid in the states and live in HI on this C1/D visa. Does this sound right? I have no other US visas.

    Thanks.

    Comment


    • #3
      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by huck747:
      They say that I can be employed by a US company, be paid in the states and live in HI on this C1/D visa. Does this sound right? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
      NO.. That company has to sponsor you for work visa. You can't stay in the USA or change status from C1/D to something else within the USA. You would have to go home and wait for the process.

      C1/D is a form of transit visa: you can come by but not stay.

      Comment


      • #4
        Huck747: This company has given you incorrect information...they obviously don't know anything about the immigration process.

        It's true that they can sponsor you for employment...but that is a long and quite complicated procedure. The company would need to prove that they couldn't find an American to do the job for which they would be sponsoring you...and, basically, you would need an advanced degree or a special skill in order to qualify. Furthermore, such visas are limited in number, and can prove quite difficult to get as a result.

        Comment


        • #5
          You cannot live or be paid in the U.S. You may be employed by the US company, but must live overseas. For instance, you are hired by an american airline. You can enter as a crewmember, but must leave the U.S. just as you do now with your current airline. For a vessel, you must leave with the sailing of the vessel or before on another vessel or aircraft. On an aircraft, you must leave as a crewmember on the same aircraft or other aircraft or deadhead back. There is a limit of your stay to 29 days or the next sailing of your vessal or aircraft. The exemption is for air crew who must have minimum hours of rest for safety purposes, generally 3-5 is maximum allowed in the U.S. on the D visa. So, you can be employed, but must live overseas and be paid overseas and depart with the next departure of your aircraft or 3-5 days max. Airline is responsible for your accomodations in the U.S., so no renting a residence or buying a house to live in. Your I-95 will say 29 days or less, but you must leave with your aircraft or vessel.

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          • #6
            Why not just use the VWP?

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            • #7
              The Visa Waiver Program is for a short-term visit only...there is a limit - as determined by the Customs and Border Protection officer - as to how many times it can be utilized within a given time frame. Again, the VWP doesn't allow employment within the United States.

              Comment


              • #8
                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SunDevilUSA:
                The Visa Waiver Program is for a short-term visit only...there is a limit - as determined by the Customs and Border Protection officer - as to how many times it can be utilized within a given time frame. Again, the VWP doesn't allow employment within the United States. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                Why does he have a C/D when he can use the VWP?

                Comment


                • #9
                  As I understand it, with a C1/D visa, you are not technically entered into the USA, rather you are paroled in. And yes, it's intended for short duration visits, crew overnight stays, that kind of thing. I believe you can't change status on it either.
                  "What you see in the photograph isn't what you saw at the time. The real skill of photography is organized visual lying."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Crew members are NOT eligible for the Visa Waiver Program when they are actively working.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Dunno about Braniff but Tower Air were famous for "Going Places" such as all the well-known war zones around the world.

                      I remember seeing a website run by former TA employees back in 1999, just before the company went bankrupt. Lets just say they didn't like "Mo" their boss much. It was a very funny website. Apparently, he didn't like the planes to leave late from the gate at JFK (penalty fee incurred) so he instructed the crew to leave on the dot of departure time...weather all passengers were on board or not. The check-in crew shut up shop and disappeared while the angry mob of would-be passengers ran after them! Those were the days
                      "What you see in the photograph isn't what you saw at the time. The real skill of photography is organized visual lying."

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                      • #12
                        C1/D is an admission. All aliens applying for admission are either TWOV, paroled, refused, or admitted.

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