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How does dismissed trespass affect citizenship?

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  • How does dismissed trespass affect citizenship?

    Hello,

    I got a trespass charge for staying in a computer lab after it closed. It was a lack of attention on my part and the university cops decided to file a trespass charge against me. There was no hassle or discussion just one cop was having a bad day and decided to take in on me regardless of his friends asking him not to file it.

    The court dismissed the case.

    How is this going to affect my naturalization
    later?

    Current Green card holder.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Hello,

    I got a trespass charge for staying in a computer lab after it closed. It was a lack of attention on my part and the university cops decided to file a trespass charge against me. There was no hassle or discussion just one cop was having a bad day and decided to take in on me regardless of his friends asking him not to file it.

    The court dismissed the case.

    How is this going to affect my naturalization
    later?

    Current Green card holder.

    Thanks.

    Comment


    • #3
      It may result in your arrest and immediate deportation upon interview.

      Read Section 12578 (i)(2)(vii)(B) and Section 12578 (i)(2)(vii)(C).
      It clearly states that any person who applies for Citizenship and who had a charge of tresspass in laboratory anytime in past, regardless of such charges being sustained or dismissed in Court, is subject to arrest and immediate deportation at the time of interview.
      No appeals or further considerations allowed per Section 17649 (d)(4)(iii)(J).
      Have all the good s.ex you can, in all the ways you can, for as long as ever you can !

      -- Sabuntium The Great

      Comment


      • #4
        May I play the gullible and ask you to provide the link to the document you are referring to?

        If you dont have the link, please stop acting like you cannot change your own underwear.

        Thanks.

        Comment


        • #5
          Of course I may provide link. It will take me a minute and I charge $200 per second.
          Either that or google it and find out on your own.
          And please, if you can't pay and/or if you are incapable of googling such a simple matter on your own, then don't waste my precious time with silly statements about my ability to change my own underwear.
          Have all the good s.ex you can, in all the ways you can, for as long as ever you can !

          -- Sabuntium The Great

          Comment


          • #6
            He won't provide a link because, simply put, the info provided is nothing but made up stuff! lol

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Kumna,

              I found the following regarding Good Moral Character as it applies to the Naturalization process. Since your case was dismissed, I think you should be okay. To be certain, you might want to consult with a qualified immigration attorney. BTW, sounds like the campus cops don't have enough to keep them busy - lol! Good luck to you!

              http://www.murthy.com/news/UDbasic.html

              GOOD MORAL CHARACTER

              Each applicant for naturalization must establish that s/he is a person of good moral character during the statutory period. However, the INS is not limited to reviewing only the statutory period to determine the individual's character. If the person has a criminal record or any other character problem that precedes the statutory period, the INS will determine whether there has been rehabilitation or if the prior acts should be considered relevant to the current moral character of the applicant. Good moral character evaluations are made on a case-by-case basis. In its regulations INS states that it will take into account "the standards of the average citizen in the community of residence."

              The most obvious moral character issue is a criminal record. The naturalization form requires that the applicant reveal all arrests and charges and the disposition of those matters. Additionally, the applicant is subjected to fingerprinting for an FBI background check to locate any criminal record. Conviction of certain serious crimes, such as murder, bars naturalization permanently. Other crimes and terms of imprisonment preclude naturalization only if they occur during the statutory period. In those cases, it may be possible to naturalize if one can establish rehabilitation and good moral character. The issues regarding crimes can be complex. An individual with a criminal record may wish to seek competent legal advice prior to making an application for naturalization.

              Another issue with respect to good moral character is willful failure to support dependents. If an applicant has a minor child (or children) who does not live with him or her, it is necessary to prove that s/he is providing adequate financial support. Proof may be in the form of a court order for child support and documentation of required payment, cancelled checks or money orders for support of the child, evidence of provision of gifts / support in kind, documentation of provision of health insurance, evidence of the child's visiting the applicant for extended periods, and affidavits from the person with whom the child lives, attesting to receipt of adequate support. The adequacy of the proof is subject to the discretion of the officer reviewing the case. An individual with a child (or children) who does not reside with her or him should keep detailed records regarding support. Support paid in cash, without receipts or proof of any type, will cause problems when applying for naturalization.

              An applicant subject to the Selective Service (military draft registration) requirements must provide his/her registration number. Knowing and willful violation of the registration requirements during the statutory period establishes lack of good moral character. Permanent resident and U.S. citizen men between 18 and 26 years of age are required to register for the draft. If an individual fails to register, he will have to convince the INS that he did not know of the requirement. If he is still within the eligible age limit he will need to register immediately and, hopefully, prior to the naturalization interview. If the failure to register was outside the statutory period, the INS has stated that the person "should ordinarily be found eligible for naturalization."

              Comment


              • #8
                ProduUSc, thank you for the Info.

                Thanks Houston.

                Sabuntium's comment is not to be taken seriously, it's just a brain ****. He seems
                genuinely befuddled by his own annal applause.

                Comment


                • #9
                  What an ungrateful imbecile !
                  Have all the good s.ex you can, in all the ways you can, for as long as ever you can !

                  -- Sabuntium The Great

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sabuntium, my first impression that you are either a putz or a schmuck has not changed.
                    As a matter of fact, I am not itching to hear from you unless you put the hash pipe down and realize that your volitional exercise of moronism is a limiting factor to reaching your potential.

                    I believe you can do better; It is time you start doing better.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Kumna:
                      Sabuntium, my first impression that you are either a putz or a schmuck has not changed.
                      As a matter of fact, I am not itching to hear from you unless you put the hash pipe down and realize that your volitional exercise of moronism is a limiting factor to reaching your potential.

                      I believe you can do better; It is time you start doing better. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                      If you are so smart, then why are you coming here asking for an advise on such a simple matter?
                      Have all the good s.ex you can, in all the ways you can, for as long as ever you can !

                      -- Sabuntium The Great

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Were you arrested in the case? If you did you need to offer that information when you fill out N-400 then it's up to the immigration officer to interprete it. I think you'd better consult an immigration lawyer for this matter.

                        Comment



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