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This is it... The Moment Of Truth!

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  • This is it... The Moment Of Truth!

    We don't know much about Kerry, but we have known Bush for 4 years as a President . Here is a short analysis on where he stands on Immigration.

    This is an article dated 11/08/2000... so what has changed since then?

    In one of the most cliffhanging elections in history, the Republicans won by a narrow lead, both in the presidency and in Congress. (Interestingly enough, the decision came down to Dade County, Florida where the Elian fiasco took place, and where Gore may just have lost a few essential votes because of Clinton's actions in that matter.) So what will sweeping Republican control of government mean to immigration issues? Let's take a look.

    With the Clinton presidency has come some extraordinary changes in immigration, some good, some bad. Regardless of which side of the issue you are on, the two most notable legislative landmarks have been the 1996 law, which got tough on illegal immigrants and violators of immigration laws, and the new H-1B law, which makes it easier for foreigners to work in the US and eventually to become residents and citizens. Of course, there has been a Republican Congress for the past eight years, and both parties have agreed on certain key immigration issues. There was a system of checks and balances, however, with extreme measures from either party being canceled out by the other. Those days are gone. All issues, including immigration, are now in the hands of the Republicans. No more checks and balances.

    President Elect Bush takes the stand that high immigration is indicative of a booming economy and a strong nation. His position as Governor has kept him in the loop where immigration issues are concerned, and he remains positive about legal immigration, but adamantly against illegal immigration, and definitely in favor of tougher enforcement laws. It is fairly likely that Congress will support his position in most immigration matters.


    Anti-Immigration:

    - Bush has promised to go all out to put a halt to illegal crossings and to secure American borders. Most analysts predict that this will be the president elect's leading priority when it comes to immigration issues. Also connected with this issue is the tough stance the new administration will likely take in terms of detaining, banning or otherwise punishing illegal immigrants. The fairness of detaining illegals indefinitely, and of deporting and banning immigrants for seemingly minor offences, even retroactively, has been a major issue in recent months. Don't expect the Republicans to work for a change in this arena.

    - Neither Bush nor Congress support amnesty for illegal aliens. This means the end of a long-time dream for many immigrants who have been hanging on to Clinton's goal to forgive certain illegal aliens and allow them to legalize as residents of the US.

    - Under Bush, revival of 245-I is highly unlikely. 245-I forgives certain deportable illegals in exchange for the payment of a fine.

    - Bush probably won't go to battle for refugees, asylees and certain groups of Central and South Americans the way Clinton has.

    - Bush will also likely be tough on violators of immigration policies and laws, such as those who lie on immigration applications, or enter the States under false pretenses. Monitoring and tracking of immigrant whereabouts and status could well be increased.


    Pro-Immigration:

    - Bush says that he wants to welcome legal immigrants and change policies that keep immigrant families apart. If he keeps this promise, this could be wonderful news for green card holders who are often separated from spouses and children for 4 or 5 years, if not longer. The policy he plans to change will allow spouses and minor children of legal permanent residents to apply for visitor visas while their immigration applications are pending. Currently, such applicants are not even allowed to visit their USA-based family member, and the family member cannot live outside of the States, or s/he will lose his/her green card.

    - He claims to support welfare for legal immigrants. Currently, most immigrants are not eligible for welfare.

    - Bush plans to encourage free trade. His belief is that one long-term solution to illegal immigration is to improve US Mexico trade relations and help feed the Mexican economy so that fewer people want to leave Mexico.

    - The Governor hopes to expand temporary visas: He supports extension of the H-2A temporary agricultural workers program so that foreign workers can provide affordable help to American farmers. He was also supportive of the recent increase in H-1B visas for high-tech and specialty workers.

    - Finally, Bush has said that he will establish a 6-month average for processing of immigration applications. This will perhaps be his greatest challenge, as many applications currently take years to be processed.


    The Wait and See...

    Bush supports a split up of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) into two agencies: one focused on enforcement and border control, and one focused on immigration and naturalization and immigrant assistance.

    An Associate Attorney General for Immigration Affairs would be in charge of both agencies.

    Bush also has an interesting plan for civil-service reforms, which would provide civil workers with incentives to make them more customer-service oriented. The same would apply to the INS.

    He also proposes that an additional $500 million in funding be provided over 5 years to support new personnel and employee incentives at the INS.

    The jury is out on whether and how well these major INS structures will work. Some believe the changes will drastically improve the situation for immigrants, while others contend that the changes will be disastrous.

    As with all the promises, threats and predictions made in politics, only time will tell.

  • #2
    We don't know much about Kerry, but we have known Bush for 4 years as a President . Here is a short analysis on where he stands on Immigration.

    This is an article dated 11/08/2000... so what has changed since then?

    In one of the most cliffhanging elections in history, the Republicans won by a narrow lead, both in the presidency and in Congress. (Interestingly enough, the decision came down to Dade County, Florida where the Elian fiasco took place, and where Gore may just have lost a few essential votes because of Clinton's actions in that matter.) So what will sweeping Republican control of government mean to immigration issues? Let's take a look.

    With the Clinton presidency has come some extraordinary changes in immigration, some good, some bad. Regardless of which side of the issue you are on, the two most notable legislative landmarks have been the 1996 law, which got tough on illegal immigrants and violators of immigration laws, and the new H-1B law, which makes it easier for foreigners to work in the US and eventually to become residents and citizens. Of course, there has been a Republican Congress for the past eight years, and both parties have agreed on certain key immigration issues. There was a system of checks and balances, however, with extreme measures from either party being canceled out by the other. Those days are gone. All issues, including immigration, are now in the hands of the Republicans. No more checks and balances.

    President Elect Bush takes the stand that high immigration is indicative of a booming economy and a strong nation. His position as Governor has kept him in the loop where immigration issues are concerned, and he remains positive about legal immigration, but adamantly against illegal immigration, and definitely in favor of tougher enforcement laws. It is fairly likely that Congress will support his position in most immigration matters.


    Anti-Immigration:

    - Bush has promised to go all out to put a halt to illegal crossings and to secure American borders. Most analysts predict that this will be the president elect's leading priority when it comes to immigration issues. Also connected with this issue is the tough stance the new administration will likely take in terms of detaining, banning or otherwise punishing illegal immigrants. The fairness of detaining illegals indefinitely, and of deporting and banning immigrants for seemingly minor offences, even retroactively, has been a major issue in recent months. Don't expect the Republicans to work for a change in this arena.

    - Neither Bush nor Congress support amnesty for illegal aliens. This means the end of a long-time dream for many immigrants who have been hanging on to Clinton's goal to forgive certain illegal aliens and allow them to legalize as residents of the US.

    - Under Bush, revival of 245-I is highly unlikely. 245-I forgives certain deportable illegals in exchange for the payment of a fine.

    - Bush probably won't go to battle for refugees, asylees and certain groups of Central and South Americans the way Clinton has.

    - Bush will also likely be tough on violators of immigration policies and laws, such as those who lie on immigration applications, or enter the States under false pretenses. Monitoring and tracking of immigrant whereabouts and status could well be increased.


    Pro-Immigration:

    - Bush says that he wants to welcome legal immigrants and change policies that keep immigrant families apart. If he keeps this promise, this could be wonderful news for green card holders who are often separated from spouses and children for 4 or 5 years, if not longer. The policy he plans to change will allow spouses and minor children of legal permanent residents to apply for visitor visas while their immigration applications are pending. Currently, such applicants are not even allowed to visit their USA-based family member, and the family member cannot live outside of the States, or s/he will lose his/her green card.

    - He claims to support welfare for legal immigrants. Currently, most immigrants are not eligible for welfare.

    - Bush plans to encourage free trade. His belief is that one long-term solution to illegal immigration is to improve US Mexico trade relations and help feed the Mexican economy so that fewer people want to leave Mexico.

    - The Governor hopes to expand temporary visas: He supports extension of the H-2A temporary agricultural workers program so that foreign workers can provide affordable help to American farmers. He was also supportive of the recent increase in H-1B visas for high-tech and specialty workers.

    - Finally, Bush has said that he will establish a 6-month average for processing of immigration applications. This will perhaps be his greatest challenge, as many applications currently take years to be processed.


    The Wait and See...

    Bush supports a split up of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) into two agencies: one focused on enforcement and border control, and one focused on immigration and naturalization and immigrant assistance.

    An Associate Attorney General for Immigration Affairs would be in charge of both agencies.

    Bush also has an interesting plan for civil-service reforms, which would provide civil workers with incentives to make them more customer-service oriented. The same would apply to the INS.

    He also proposes that an additional $500 million in funding be provided over 5 years to support new personnel and employee incentives at the INS.

    The jury is out on whether and how well these major INS structures will work. Some believe the changes will drastically improve the situation for immigrants, while others contend that the changes will be disastrous.

    As with all the promises, threats and predictions made in politics, only time will tell.

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