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  • want can i do?

    this really doesn't seem fair.. though i know life isn't fair i cant help to wonder why. i wasnt born here in USA. my mother brought me here when i was about four years old. it was not done the right way. feels like it was the biggest mistake made by my mother. i cant really blame her as far as i know it seems like she really didn't have much of a choice to come here. but that's another subject. well the point is i am here no 21 years old still illegal and i don't have any idea what to do about it.. i know i can become a citizen by marrying a citizen, but really thats not much of a choice for me at this point of my life. i really dont want to have scam the law and get married just to stay here. it really doesnt seem fair either.. there is so many things everyone that i grew up with can do that i cant.. drive for one thing... have a normal job another.. just doesn't seem fair.
    can anyone help me with information on this. is there some law for my case. i mean i would like to think that there is, i hate the fact that im so ignorant about this problem of mine. but then again it seems like everyone i know is too.

  • #2
    this really doesn't seem fair.. though i know life isn't fair i cant help to wonder why. i wasnt born here in USA. my mother brought me here when i was about four years old. it was not done the right way. feels like it was the biggest mistake made by my mother. i cant really blame her as far as i know it seems like she really didn't have much of a choice to come here. but that's another subject. well the point is i am here no 21 years old still illegal and i don't have any idea what to do about it.. i know i can become a citizen by marrying a citizen, but really thats not much of a choice for me at this point of my life. i really dont want to have scam the law and get married just to stay here. it really doesnt seem fair either.. there is so many things everyone that i grew up with can do that i cant.. drive for one thing... have a normal job another.. just doesn't seem fair.
    can anyone help me with information on this. is there some law for my case. i mean i would like to think that there is, i hate the fact that im so ignorant about this problem of mine. but then again it seems like everyone i know is too.

    Comment


    • #3
      Even if you married a U.S. citizen, you'd probably have to go back to your country and wait while your spouse filed a request for a waiver of the 10-year bar. (Only illegal aliens who entered the U.S. legally can adjust status here through marriage.)

      As for "fair", well, it's not "fair" to people who come legally that people ignore our immigration laws.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sins read this:
        Dream Act Reintroduced in Senate From: Immigrants' Rights Update, Vol. 17, No. 5, September 4, 2003. A new version of the bipartisan DREAM Act, which addresses the tragedy of young people who grew up in the United States and have graduated from U.S. high schools but whose future is circumscribed by current immigration laws, has been introduced in the Senate by Senators Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Richard Durbin (D-IL). A new version of the bipartisan DREAM Act, which addresses the tragedy of young people who grew up in the United States and have graduated from U.S. high schools but whose future is circumscribed by current immigration laws, has been introduced in the Senate by Senators Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Richard Durbin (D-IL). Under current law, these young people generally derive their immigration status solely from their parents, and when the parents are undocumented or in immigration limbo, their children have no mechanism to obtain legal residency. The Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act (S. 1545), introduced on July 31, 2003, provides such a mechanism for those who are able to meet certain conditions.
        The leading bill in the House addressing the same issue is HR 1684 (Cannon, R-UT), known as the Student Adjustment Act. HR 1684 was introduced this spring and currently has 66 cosponsors from both parties.
        Like last year's version of the DREAM Act, which was also sponsored by Sen. Hatch, S. 1545 would enact two major changes in current law:
        Eliminate the federal provision that discourages states from providing in-state tuition without regard to immigration status; and
        Permit some immigrant students who have grown up in the U.S. to apply for legal status.
        But S. 1545 differs in some important respects from its predecessor.
        Unlike last year's bill, DREAM 2003 sets up a two-stage process for applying for legal status. Immigrant students who have grown up in the U.S., graduated from high school here, and can demonstrate good moral character would initially qualify for "conditional lawful permanent resident" status, which would normally last for six years. During the conditional period, the immigrant would be required to go to college, join the military, or work a significant number of hours of community service. At the end of the conditional period, those who meet at least one of these requirements would be eligible for regular lawful permanent resident status.
        If enacted, DREAM 2003 would have a life-changing impact on the students who qualify, dramatically increasing their average future earnings-and, consequently, the amount of taxes they would pay-while significantly reducing criminal justice and social services costs to taxpayers.
        Advocates believe that S. 1545 has a reasonable chance of passage in this session of Congress, in large part because Senators Hatch and Durbin were willing to bridge the bitter partisan divisions that have plagued the Senate this year. The bill already has 15 cosponsors representing a wide swath of the political spectrum; others are expected to announce their support now that Congress has reconvened after its summer break.
        The following are some of the key features of DREAM 2003:
        Restore State Option to Provide In-State Tuition Benefit. DREAM 2003 would repeal section 505 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRIRA), which discourages states from providing in-state tuition or other higher education benefits without regard to immigration status.
        Who Qualifies for Legal Residency. Under DREAM 2003, most students of good moral character who came to the U.S. before they were sixteen years old and at least five years before the date of the bill's enactment would qualify for conditional permanent resident status upon acceptance to college, graduation from high school, or being awarded a general equivalency diploma (GED). Students would not qualify for this relief if they had committed crimes, were a security risk, or were inadmissible or removable on certain other grounds.
        Conditional Permanent Resident Status. Qualifying students would be granted conditional permanent resident status, which would be similar to lawful permanent resident status, except that it would be awarded for a limited period of time-6 years, under normal circumstances-instead of for an indefinite one. Students with conditional permanent resident status would be able to work, drive, go to school, and otherwise participate normally in day-to-day activities on the same terms as other Americans, except that they would not be able to travel abroad for lengthy periods. Time spent by young people in conditional permanent resident status would count towards the residency requirements for naturalization to U.S. citizenship.
        Requirements to Lift the Condition and Obtain Regular Lawful Permanent Resident Status. At the end of the conditional period, regular lawful permanent resident status would be granted if, during the conditional period, the immigrant had maintained good moral character, avoided lengthy trips abroad, and met at least one of the following three criteria:
        1. Graduated from a 2-year college or a vocational college that meets certain criteria, or studied for at least 2 years towards a bachelor's or a higher degree; or
        2. Served in the U.S. armed forces for at least 2 years; or
        3. Performed at least 910 hours of volunteer community service.
        The 6-year time period for meeting these requirements would be extendable upon a showing of good cause, and the Dept. of Homeland Security would be empowered to waive the requirements altogether if compelling reasons such as disability prevented their completion and if removal of the student would result in exceptional and extremely unusual hardship to the student, or to the student's spouse, parent or child.

        Comment


        • #5
          Bill--The DREAM Act you presented above died in Congress. In order to be reconsidered, it has to be reintroduced, which it hasn't been yet. If a bill doesn't pass during a session of Congress, which this didn't, it has to be reintroduced in a new session.

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          • #6
            i really dont understand why wouldn't it pass.. ppl like me that grew up here but werent born here really didnt have a choice.. same as ppl born here didnt have a choice... they just got lucky i guess?? yet i would still not mind doing any of those requirements. the only reason im not in college is because i cant affort to pay the tuition which is like $164 per unit.. (how would i have that kind of money with the kind of job a person like me can get). the armed forces well i always wanted to go to the air forcedbut like everything i couldnt.. oh and the 900 hours of community sirvice withen 6 years.. thats an easy one.. though i really dislike the fact im treated like i have done this big crime.. i guess i should have known better when i was four right?? i shuold of said "no mother, im staying"

            Comment


            • #7
              Life is never fair, whoever thinks life is fair is either drunk, delusional or simply out of their mind. As Aliba said, would it be fair for those people that spent decades trying to immigrate to the US legally, when others can simply crossed the border illegaly and then claim ignorance to get legalized?

              Comment


              • #8
                yea i know its not. i mean i know im not wanted here.. the last thing some of you guys want is to see us make something of ourselves. thats okay with me now..
                i do undestand that grown people should come here the right way.. i mean i claim this to my mother all the time.. i mean i wouldnt have even mind growing up in mex. be because of reasons i didnt. but as i said before... i was four. when i turn 18 and a grad from high school, i did think about moving to mex and starting a life there( which would be same as starting a life in any other country) but i have young sibling here who need me.. and so i started to work a labor job because thats all i was able to get.. (hate the fact that i see soo many of my friends who used to cheat of me in high school have way better jobs)
                so yeah if things dont work out by the time my siblings are old enough to support themself i will simply start a new life away from my family and friends.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Perhaps if so many parents didn't come here precisely because they want to get their kids a "free" education and a "better life" then we wouldn't be so reluctant to say that these kids should get amnesty. But when you have 65,000 kids a year (or so DREAM Act advocates claim) who are here illegally graduating from our schools, it's pretty hard to see how an amnesty such as the Dream Act wouldn't do anything other than encourage it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    No, you shouldn't have known better when you were four. But you should have known better at 18, which is when you became responsible and when you started accumulating overstay time. Until then, you probably could have left the country, gone home, and applied to come here legally on a student visa. In fact, from what you said, you still could go somewhere else--except that you feel responsible for your family, which is yet another decision of your parents' that you're ending up responsible for.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      sins,

                      You came here at 4yrs old and now you are 21 yrs old and you dont expect to mary a USCIS?

                      Something does not cut it. Dont you ever date USCIS? Are you straight? By this time, you must be fully americanized. If I were you, I would just expect to marry a USCIS that I love unless you want to do the spouse mail order thing. If you havent found one yet, just keep on doing what you are doing. Once you find someone that you love, you can marry. However, it's kind of immature to rule out all USCIS already, for you never know who you will fall in love with.
                      That said, good luck.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What really bugs me about the whole thing is WHY
                        Mexicans who came over here illegally haven't gone back and rebuilt Mexico. If the millions here illegally would go back with money they have made here they could form a decent government and start businesses. They could reduce the poverty and build schools. They could wipe out the gang problem and make Mexico a homeland to be proud of. Your people have been running over here for at least 50 years..in that time Mexicans would have done something about Mexico had we shut the border and made you all go home.

                        Instead of whining why don't you listen. Do you have a clue of how much illegals are costing American citizens in taxes?? And every time I turn around they are moaning and wanting more!
                        We owe you NOTHING.

                        What can you do for Mexico??

                        And by the way, I went to college and got a degree but I spent 4 years in the Army to get the GI bill to pay for school.

                        Another thing, when we were running our own small business we couldn't afford private medical insurance. We got sick but a visit to
                        a doctor or hospital meant a whopping bill in our mailbox we had to pay..Mexicans just show up at the hospital and Americans have to foot the bill.

                        Three wonderful young Mexican boys (ages 13, 11, and 11) stole my daughters car while she was at work. They hot-wired it and wrecked it the next day running from the police (btw, she was 7 months pregnant at the time).

                        You know what..I better shut up before my blood pressure rises any more.

                        I have no sympathy for you.

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