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  • Back to the Border

    April 22, 2006, 9:00 a.m.
    Back to the Border
    Security first.

    By Senator Bill Frist

    Democrat obstruction torpedoed comprehensive immigration reform in the Senate earlier this month. At the same time, concerns about getting our border under control came into clear relief with news this week of the Department of Homeland Security's effort to crack down on egregious violations of immigration law. It is time to both secure our borders and reform our immigration system. So next week, the Senate will act to increase funding for border security-first. And then, before the end of May, the Senate must again take up-and finish-comprehensive immigration system reform.

    When it takes up the immigration reform, the Senate must address border security, worksite enforcement, and the status of the 12 million people who are currently here illegally. But to build confidence among Americans and Congress that the government takes border security seriously, we have to act to help get the border under control right now.

    By Memorial Day, the president plans to sign an emergency-spending measure, which we will use to fund this next step in border security. Democrat obstructionism on the larger immigration bill, I hope, will end before that. So far it has not: Minority Leader Harry Reid has acted to block the Senate from even voting on proposals like a ban on convicted felons taking part in temporary-worker programs.

    Under any circumstances, security has to come first. We don't know how many criminals, gang members, and terrorists might have snuck across in the 20 years since Congress last made serious reforms to our immigration system. We need to know who is in our country, and why. A comprehensive immigration bill will allow all levels of law enforcement to focus on those who threaten to do us harm.

    Last year, Judd Gregg and others led an effort to hire 1,500 new border patrol agents and build 1,800 new detention beds. The proposal we will consider next week provides nearly $2 billion to build a border fence in high-traffic areas, add new border-patrol aircraft to help police lower traffic areas, and support training for additional Customs and Border Protection Agents.

    The Senate is also near consensus on putting nearly 15,000 new border-patrol agents in the field over the next six years. More security spending now is part of the plan. To pay for it, we will cut spending in other areas. The proposal we will consider next week helps Customs and Border Protection enforce the laws we already have. It does not, however, include any of the still necessary reforms to our immigration laws contained in the broader comprehensive package we will act on in May.

    For those with deep concerns about the bigger bill, the Senate will be putting the horse before the cart. Security first. Right now. But just as the horse goes with the cart, our action now must occur in concert with finishing action on the bigger immigration bill in May. That legislation contains the full multiyear plan to beef up border-security operations dramatically, including a virtual fence that uses a mix of physical and electronic means to secure every inch of our 1,951-mile border with Mexico.

    I believe that a consensus has developed in the Senate that fixing border security is as important as creating an immigrant worker program. In early April, in fact, the Senate came very close to a breakthrough: Senators Chuck Hagel and Mel Martinez, along with many others, developed a fair, workable plan that would help deal with the 12 million people who are already in the United States.

    Under their proposal, nobody who has violated immigration laws will get a free pass. Nearly everyone who has lived here illegally less than two years will have to return to their country of origin and apply through ordinary channels if they ever hope to live here legally. People who have lived here longer will have to pass rigorous background checks, learn English, and pay fines if they ever hope to achieve legal status.

    Action now on border-security spending ought to affirm our country's commitment to getting the border under control. Passing a comprehensive immigration bill will guarantee a sustained plan to improve border security and deal with comprehensive reform. It will honor our heritage as a nation of immigrants and our respect for the rule of law. Finally, and most importantly, it will make America safer and more secure.

    "” Bill Frist is the U.S. Senate Majority Leader.


    * * *

  • #2
    April 22, 2006, 9:00 a.m.
    Back to the Border
    Security first.

    By Senator Bill Frist

    Democrat obstruction torpedoed comprehensive immigration reform in the Senate earlier this month. At the same time, concerns about getting our border under control came into clear relief with news this week of the Department of Homeland Security's effort to crack down on egregious violations of immigration law. It is time to both secure our borders and reform our immigration system. So next week, the Senate will act to increase funding for border security-first. And then, before the end of May, the Senate must again take up-and finish-comprehensive immigration system reform.

    When it takes up the immigration reform, the Senate must address border security, worksite enforcement, and the status of the 12 million people who are currently here illegally. But to build confidence among Americans and Congress that the government takes border security seriously, we have to act to help get the border under control right now.

    By Memorial Day, the president plans to sign an emergency-spending measure, which we will use to fund this next step in border security. Democrat obstructionism on the larger immigration bill, I hope, will end before that. So far it has not: Minority Leader Harry Reid has acted to block the Senate from even voting on proposals like a ban on convicted felons taking part in temporary-worker programs.

    Under any circumstances, security has to come first. We don't know how many criminals, gang members, and terrorists might have snuck across in the 20 years since Congress last made serious reforms to our immigration system. We need to know who is in our country, and why. A comprehensive immigration bill will allow all levels of law enforcement to focus on those who threaten to do us harm.

    Last year, Judd Gregg and others led an effort to hire 1,500 new border patrol agents and build 1,800 new detention beds. The proposal we will consider next week provides nearly $2 billion to build a border fence in high-traffic areas, add new border-patrol aircraft to help police lower traffic areas, and support training for additional Customs and Border Protection Agents.

    The Senate is also near consensus on putting nearly 15,000 new border-patrol agents in the field over the next six years. More security spending now is part of the plan. To pay for it, we will cut spending in other areas. The proposal we will consider next week helps Customs and Border Protection enforce the laws we already have. It does not, however, include any of the still necessary reforms to our immigration laws contained in the broader comprehensive package we will act on in May.

    For those with deep concerns about the bigger bill, the Senate will be putting the horse before the cart. Security first. Right now. But just as the horse goes with the cart, our action now must occur in concert with finishing action on the bigger immigration bill in May. That legislation contains the full multiyear plan to beef up border-security operations dramatically, including a virtual fence that uses a mix of physical and electronic means to secure every inch of our 1,951-mile border with Mexico.

    I believe that a consensus has developed in the Senate that fixing border security is as important as creating an immigrant worker program. In early April, in fact, the Senate came very close to a breakthrough: Senators Chuck Hagel and Mel Martinez, along with many others, developed a fair, workable plan that would help deal with the 12 million people who are already in the United States.

    Under their proposal, nobody who has violated immigration laws will get a free pass. Nearly everyone who has lived here illegally less than two years will have to return to their country of origin and apply through ordinary channels if they ever hope to live here legally. People who have lived here longer will have to pass rigorous background checks, learn English, and pay fines if they ever hope to achieve legal status.

    Action now on border-security spending ought to affirm our country's commitment to getting the border under control. Passing a comprehensive immigration bill will guarantee a sustained plan to improve border security and deal with comprehensive reform. It will honor our heritage as a nation of immigrants and our respect for the rule of law. Finally, and most importantly, it will make America safer and more secure.

    "” Bill Frist is the U.S. Senate Majority Leader.


    * * *

    Comment


    • #3
      McKennedy, Frist and Cornyn are supporting dirtbag amnesty !!!!!

      We must not allow "temporary worker" dirtbag amnesty program !!!

      Comment


      • #4
        What are you talking? Cornyn never did !

        Comment


        • #5
          What a doofos you are !!!!



          READ THIS FROM FAIRUS.ORG WEBSITE !!!!



          _______________________________________


          Cornyn bill a thinly disguised amnesty


          July 28, 2003




          Commentary by Dan Stein
          Executive Director, Federation for American Immigration Reform
          Published July 28, 2003 in the Dallas Morning News

          If truth is the first casualty of war, then linguistic clarity is the first casualty of service in Washington. We all remember how Bill Clinton tested the semantic outer limits of the English language over the definition of the word "is." Texas Sen. John Cornyn has been in town only a little more than six months, and already he's bending and stretching definitions in new and imaginative ways.

          Sen. Cornyn's new bill, "The Border Security and Immigration Reform Act of 2003," which is introduced on July 10, is ostensibly a program to bring additional foreign guest workers to the US. And not "an amnesty program, nor a path to citizenship" for illegal aliens, he states categorically.

          Reading a bit further on in a bill summary put out by his office, one finds that illegal aliens already living in the U.S. will be eligible for guest worker status, and that "a worker in the program is absolved of all prior illegal behavior relating to their immigration status."

          In addition, "Any guest worker employed less than three years or [who] has violated the terms of the program is prohibited from adjusting their immigration status to permanent residence."

          OK. The bill is not an amnesty program for illegal aliens, but illegal immigrants are eligible to apply, and if they remain in the program for more than three years they will be able to adjust their immigration status and obtain permanent residence in the United States.

          However creatively Mr. Cornyn wants to define it, most people who have a passing familiarity with the English language will conclude that what he is proposing sounds very much like an amnesty program with a three-year "apprenticeship" provision added on. Whether legal permanent residence kicks in immediately, or after three years, any bill that turns illegal aliens into citizens is an amnesty.

          In addition to being linguistically out of touch with the rest of the nation, Mr. Cornyn demonstrates timing that indicates he has very quickly lost touch with the economic realities of the country. The introduction of his new guest worker proposal comes exactly one week after the Labor Department released data that show U.S. unemployment at the highest levels since 1994, and the economy shedding jobs at an alarming pace - 913,000 in the past four months.

          Why exactly do we need a new guest worker program with unemployment on the rise and more than 9 million Americans officially out of work? Moreover, the guest workers who are likely to enter as a result of the Cornyn bill will compete directly with the segment of the U.S. labor force that has been hurt the most by the lingering economic slump.

          Even in the economic boom years of the late 1990s there was no evidence of a shortage of workers at the lower-skill end of the labor market. Real wages for most blue-collar workers remained stagnant or even declined during the periods of lowest unemployment in recent memory. Certainly there is even less justification today for a new guest worker program, much less one that also includes a (conditional) amnesty program.

          The Cornyn guest worker/amnesty bill is part of an ongoing pursuit of cheap labor. Whether it is favorable tax breaks for companies that outsource American jobs to workers overseas, or programs to bring foreign workers to do jobs that have to be done in this country, cheap labor has become the dominant interest of many politicians in Washington.

          A new guest worker/amnesty program may benefit the short-term interest of some business and ethnic advocacy groups, but it is a very shortsighted sacrifice that will harm many American workers and strain the social bonds of this country. The legitimate goal of remaining competitive in a global economy cannot be served by undermining the middle-class workers who form the backbone of this country.

          No amount of semantic acrobatics can change reality. A program that will allow an undetermined number of illegal aliens to gain legal residence - either immediately, or three years hence - is an amnesty. A program that will bring in untold numbers of guest workers at a time when 9 million Americans are unemployed is just a way for employers to cut labor costs. It is what it is - and most of us understand the definition of "is."

          Comment


          • #6
            Liemaster

            You are a buttman for Tancredo. Hence, you have the same views as him, he's the new Gary Condit in DC. So, you are HE-Chandra Levy

            You should be ashamed of your hatred for harboring such feelings towards immigrants. You should be baked in a hot sauce, naked with Tancredo massaging your butt, like he usually does when you visit him in DC. Idiot...

            Comment


            • #7
              So, you are HE-Chandra Levy
              You are an Arab-Muslim-Hitler-Communist-Nazi-Terrorist-Maniac who dares to post veiled threats against me by making parrallels between myself and murdered in RC park Chandra Levy !!!

              How dare you terrorize me like that !!!

              Get out of my board now, dirtbag !!!!!!

              Comment



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