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  • Dog to United States

    How can I bring my Dog to USA. He is currently in India. Do I need to file a petition for him. If yes, does he need to appear at the US consulate in New Delhi.
    Please Clarify. Thanks.

  • #2
    How can I bring my Dog to USA. He is currently in India. Do I need to file a petition for him. If yes, does he need to appear at the US consulate in New Delhi.
    Please Clarify. Thanks.

    Comment


    • #3
      Travelers frequently ask about taking their pets with them to the United States. All such importation is subject to health, quarantine, agriculture, wildlife, and customs requirements and prohibitions. Pets taken out of the United States and returned are subject to the same requirements as those entering for the first time.

      Sadly, pets excluded from entry into the United States must either be exported or destroyed. While awaiting disposition, pets will be detained at the owner's expense at the port of arrival.

      The U.S. Public Health Service requires that pet dogs and cats brought into this country be examined at the first port of entry for evidence of diseases that can be transmitted to humans. Dogs coming from areas not free of rabies must be accompanied by a valid rabies vaccination certificate. Turtles are subject to certain restrictions, and monkeys may not be imported as pets under any circumstances.

      The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is concerned with the importation, trade, sale, and taking of wildlife and with protecting endangered plant and animal species. Some wildlife species of dogs, cats, turtles, reptiles, and birds, although imported as pets, may be listed as endangered. Endangered and threatened animal and plant wildlife, migratory birds, marine mammals, and certain injurious wildlife may not be imported without special federal permits. Sportsmen will find the section on wildlife of particular interest, since game birds and animals are subject to special entry requirements.

      You should also check with state, county, and municipal authorities for local restrictions on importing pets.



      Transportation & Handling

      All birds and animals must be imported under healthy, humane conditions. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulations require that careful arrangements be made with the carrier for suitable cages, space, ventilation, and protection from the elements. Cleaning, feeding, watering, and other necessary services must be provided. Under the Animal Welfare Act, the Department of Agriculture is responsible for setting the standards concerning the transportation, handling, care, and treatment of animals.

      Every imported container of pets, or package of animal parts or products, must be plainly marked, labeled or tagged on the outside with the names and addresses of the shipper and consignee, along with an accurate invoice specifying the number of each species contained in the shipment.

      Since hours of service and availability of inspectors from the other agencies involved may vary from port to port, you are strongly urged to check with your anticipated port of arrival before importing a pet or other animal. This will assure expeditious processing and reduce the possibility of unnecessary delays.



      Customs Duty

      Dogs, cats, and turtles are free of duty. Other pets imported into the United States, if subject to a customs duty, may be included in your customs exemption if they accompany you and are imported for your personal use and not for sale.



      Purebred Animals

      Purebred animals other than domesticated livestock that are imported for breeding purposes are free of duty under certain conditions. A declaration is required to show that the importer is a citizen of the United States; that the animal is imported specifically for breeding purposes; that it is identical with the description in the certificate of pedigree presented; and that it is registered in the country of origin in a book of registry recognized by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

      An application to the Department of Agriculture on VS Form 17-338 for a certificate of pure breeding must be furnished before the animal is examined at the designated port of entry. For complete details, contact the National Center for Import and Export of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page).



      Birds

      All birds -- those taken out of the country as well as those being returned -- are subject to controls and restrictions. In addition, nearly all birds coming into the country require a permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

      To prevent outbreaks of the exotic Newcastle disease, the following U.S. Department of Agriculture controls and restrictions have been in effect since January 1980:

      Birds must be quarantined upon arrival for at least 30 days in a USDA-operated facility at the owner's expense. These facilities are located at the following ports of entry:
      New York, NY
      (718)553-1727

      San Ysidro, CA
      (310)215-2352 McAllen, TX
      (210)782-7995

      Los Angeles, CA
      (310)215-1314 Miami, FL
      (305)526-2926




      (California reservations should be made in Los Angeles.)

      A 30-day quarantine costs approximately $200 per bird; cost is subject to change.



      Quarantine space must be reserved in advance by submitting VS Form 17-23 with the full amount. The form is available from USDA offices, American consulates, and embassies.
      A health certificate executed by the national veterinarian of the country of export must accompany the bird. The certificate must have been executed no more than 30 days prior to the bird's arrival. This certificate must affirm that the bird has been examined, that it shows no evidence of communicable disease, and that it is being exported in accordance with the laws of that country. VS Form 17-23 may be used for this purpose.
      The bird must be removed from the quarantine facility within five days of notification of release. It is the owner's responsibility to arrange for the bird's transportation and to pay the costs of quarantine.
      Birds from Canada that have been in the owner's possession for at least 90 days before importation and that are found healthy upon veterinary inspection at one of the Canadian border ports of entry where veterinarians are stationed are exempt from the 30-day quarantine.

      Pet birds originating in the United States may be re-imported without being quarantined if they are accompanied by a United States veterinary health certificate and, if necessary, a permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This health certificate must be obtained prior to departure from the United States and must include a leg band or tattoo number.
      Pet birds must be kept separate and apart from all other birds and poultry while outside the United States.
      Federal permits are required by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the importation and exportation of most bird species listed under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, endangered birds and native species, including feathers, parts and mounted specimens, and certain live injurious species. In addition, foreign wildlife permits may be required. Be sure to check with the foreign country for its wildlife requirements. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service clearance is required to import and export all non-domestic birds and their parts and products.
      Because certain States administer their own regulations to protect wildlife and animal health, you should contact appropriate State officials to learn about State requirements, if any, when making importation arrangements.



      Cats

      All domestic cats must be free of evidence of disease communicable to humans when examined at the port of entry. If the animal is not in apparent good health, further examination by a licensed veterinarian may be required at the owner's expense. Cats arriving in Hawaii or Guam, both of which are free of rabies, are subject to that state's/ territory's quarantine requirements.



      Dogs

      Domestic dogs must be free of evidence of diseases communicable to humans when examined at the port of entry. If the animal is not in apparent good health, further examination by a licensed veterinarian may be required at the owner's expense.

      Dogs must be vaccinated against rabies at least 30 days before entering the United States. This requirement does not apply, however, to puppies less than three months of age or to dogs originating or located for at least six months in areas designated by the U.S. Public Health Service as being rabies-free.

      The following procedures pertain to dogs arriving from areas that are not free of rabies:

      A valid rabies vaccination certificate should accompany the animal. This certificate should be in English or be accompanied by a translation. It should identify the animal, the dates of vaccination and expiration, and be signed by a licensed veterinarian. If no expiration date is specified, the certificate is acceptable if the date of vaccination is no more than 12 months before the date of arrival.
      If a vaccination has not been performed, or if the certificate is not valid, the animal may be admitted if it is confined immediately upon arrival at a place of the owner's choosing. The dog must be vaccinated within four days after arrival at the final destination, but no more than 10 days after arrival at the port of entry. The animal must remain in confinement for at least 30 days after being vaccinated.
      If the vaccination was performed less than 30 days before arrival, the animal may be admitted but must be confined at a place of the owner's choosing until at least 30 days have passed since the vaccination.
      Young puppies must be confined at a place of the owner's choosing until they are three months old, then they must be vaccinated. They must remain in confinement for 30 days.

      Dogs that arrive in Hawaii or Guam, both of which are free of rabies, are subject to the state's or territory's quarantine requirements, in addition to whatever other Public Health Service requirements, above, apply.



      Monkeys

      Monkeys and other primates may be brought into the United States for scientific, educational or exhibition purposes by importers who are registered with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). However, under no circumstances may they be imported as pets. Registered importers who wish to import or export primates for a permitted purpose in accordance with CDC requirements are also required to obtain clearance from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) requires that all primates have permits.



      Turtles

      Live turtles with shells less than four inches long (linear measure) may not be imported for commercial purposes. An individual may import live turtles with shells less than four inches long and may also import viable turtle eggs, provided that for each arrival, there is no more than one lot containing fewer than seven viable turtle eggs, or any combination thereof totaling less than seven

      There are no Public Health Service restrictions on the importation of live turtles with a shell longer than four inches. Turtles are subject to all requirements of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which are outlined below.



      Wildlife

      The following categories of wildlife and fish are subject to certain prohibitions, restrictions, permit and quarantine requirements:

      Mammals, birds, amphibians, fish, insects, crustaceans, mollusks, and other invertebrates.
      Any part or products, such as feathers, skins, eggs; and articles manufactured from wildlife.

      Federal laws prohibit the importation or transportation of any wildlife or wildlife parts that violate state or foreign laws.

      The following ports are designated for entry of all fish and wildlife: Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Honolulu, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, New York/Newark, Portland, San Francisco, and Seattle. All such packages and containers must be marked, labeled or tagged to plainly indicate the name and address of the shipper and consignee, and the number and nature of contents. Wildlife in any form, including pets, imported into or exported from the United States must be declared and cleared on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Form 3-177 (Declaration for Importation or Exportation of Fish or Wildlife) by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service prior to release by U.S. Customs. Contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for further clearance requirements and for a copy of the pamphlets Facts About Federal Wildlife Laws and Buyer Beware. Also contact the National Center for Import and Export of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page ) for information about importing animal and bird products such as hides, eggs, feathers, etc.



      Game: Birds & Other Animals

      Game birds and animals, other than protected species, that are legally taken by United States residents in Canada or Mexico may be imported for non-commercial purposes at any Customs port of entry and declared on a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Form 3-177. Game must be accompanied by a valid hunting license, tags, stamps, and by an export document from the country where taken, if such is required. Only United States residents may import game free of duty.

      United States residents may only import migratory game birds that they themselves have legally killed. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has regulations regarding the number and species of migratory game birds that may be imported from Canada, Mexico, and other countries. Hunters should familiarize themselves with the restrictions on migratory game birds taken legally during open season in other countries; hunter should also be aware that some countries require wildlife export permits. Certain U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) restrictions may also apply. Contact the USDA's Plant Protection and Quarantine Veterinary Medical Office for more information.

      Game birds and waterfowl that are being imported as trophies must be sent to a taxidermy facility that has been approved by the USDA's Veterinary Services. A list of approved taxidermists in a particular state can be obtained from the Animal Products Staff, National Center for Import-Export; telephone 301-734-3277.

      Bones, horns and hoofs that are imported as trophies may be imported without further restrictions if they are clean, dry and free of undried pieces of hide, flesh, or sinew. Many animals, game birds, products, and byproducts from such animals and game birds are prohibited, or allowed only restricted, entry into the United States. Specific requirements vary according to the country of export; for more information about importations by country, contact the National Center for Import and Export of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page).



      Endangered Species

      The United States is a party in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, commonly known as CITES. This treaty regulates trade in endangered species of wildlife, plants and their products. International trade in species listed by CITES is illegal unless authorized by permit. Items prohibited by CITES include, but are not limited to, articles made from whale teeth, ivory, tortoise shell, reptile, fur skins, coral, and birds. Permits to import into or export from the United States and re-export certificates are issued by the Office of Management Authority of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page). Information on wildlife and plants, including lists of endangered species, may be obtained from that agency.



      HELP!

      All regulations cannot be covered in detail, and regulations are subject to change. If you plan to enter the U.S. with a pet, contact your nearest U.S. Consulate or Embassy or the specific agency mentioned. Their addresses and websites are:

      U.S. Customs Service

      If you are outside the United States, contact the Customs Attaché or Commercial Officer at your nearest U.S. Consulate or Embassy.
      U.S. Customs Attaches Throughout the World
      U.S. Customs Officers in Foreign Countries
      Contact a U.S. Customs port
      U.S. Customs Service
      Washington, DC 20229
      Tel. (202) 927-6724
      http://www.customs.gov

      U.S. Public Health Service
      Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      Division of Quarantine (E-03)
      Atlanta, GA 30333
      Tel. (404)639-8107
      http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/animal.htm and
      http://www.cdc.gov/od/ohs/biosfty/imprtper.htm

      National Center for Import and Export
      Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
      U.S. Department of Agriculture
      Unit 40
      Riverdale, MD 20737-1234
      Tel. (301)734-3277
      Fax (301)734-8226
      http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ncie

      To obtain wildlife permits:
      U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
      Office of Managment Authority
      4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Room 700
      Arlington, Virginia 22203
      Tel. 1-800-358-2104
      Fax (703)358-2281
      http://www.fws.gov (International Affairs)

      To learn clearance requirements for fish and wildlife:
      U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
      Office of Law Enforcement
      P.O. Box 3247
      Arlington, Virginia 22203
      http://www.fws.gov (Law Enforcement)

      Comment


      • #4
        Depo Man


        NO way No way.. Did you just contribute excellent advise on this forum?????? Good for you!!!!!

        Geesh.. Whats this forum coming to. thought 4 sure I was going to get a laugh on this one.

        Comment


        • #5
          I am actually a VERY strong supporter of LEGAL immigration. However, being a direct victim of a fraud makes me very cynical towards the entire immigration and fraudulent grints.

          Fraudulent dogs – Get out of America !!!!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            ruf ruf

            Comment


            • #7
              Awwww!

              Is she cute? My dog will marry her and file a petition for her. However, if she is a fraudster he will not sign I 751 and get her deported!

              Comment


              • #8
                I believe that the OP said "he".

                Comment


                • #9
                  I can not help you in that case !

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Caesar would make a fine husband. But does he make enough to be a sponsor?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      yes she's very cute. It is a Russian Siberian Husky! Blue eyes and very fit.

                      You say u are asking for your dog....really ? what do u thinks folks

                      Oh she also has a half sister (different fathers) she is a sheep Has very nice fur..coat. I have heard this from several that she is better than some women.

                      awoooool!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Caesar does not trust Russians; he makes enough to be a sponsor!

                        AMERICA - LOVE IT OR LEAVE IT !!!!!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That's my Depo Dog

                          L i c k it or Leave it!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My pup briefly considered the situation. Her final word is "woofff , werrooff , woof woof woooorooof , wahoo ___ , WOOF WOOF WOOF WOOF (no, I've seen what immigration has done to Mommy's life, once ___, is here then no more petitioning for anyone including dogs)." She also told me that she could only fall in love if 4now were to have good looking male lab or golden retriever.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Deport fraudulent dogs !

                              Comment

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