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  • Dual Citizenship

    My son's wife is from Australia and they married here in Minnesota in 2002. They now have a child born in 2004 in Minnesota. My daughter-in-law wants to move back to Australia because she feels that there are more job opportunites there. My son says that he can't even apply for Australian jobs unless he is there and an Australian citizen. My daugher-in-law told him that he could become an Australian citizen and retain his American citizenship and so could their child. I thought you could not retain your American citizenship if you became a citizen from another country. I don't want him to renounce his American citizenship in hopes of getting a better job in Australia. Thank you for any information. Joelle

  • #2
    My son's wife is from Australia and they married here in Minnesota in 2002. They now have a child born in 2004 in Minnesota. My daughter-in-law wants to move back to Australia because she feels that there are more job opportunites there. My son says that he can't even apply for Australian jobs unless he is there and an Australian citizen. My daugher-in-law told him that he could become an Australian citizen and retain his American citizenship and so could their child. I thought you could not retain your American citizenship if you became a citizen from another country. I don't want him to renounce his American citizenship in hopes of getting a better job in Australia. Thank you for any information. Joelle

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    • #3
      They don't have permanent residency there?

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      • #4
        She is an Australian citizen but he is an American and to get a job would have to become an Australian citizen but she thinks he can have dual citizenship, American and Australian as could their child. Is this true can my son and my grandson be dual American and Australian citizens or do you have to relinquish your american citizenship to become a citizen in another country. Joelle

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        • #5
          Joelle: Please refer to 7 FAM 1162 about Dual Nationality: go to http://state.gov, then go to other services, from their to Foreign Affairs Manuals/handbook clik. look for section 1162, you will find your answers
          (1) The United States does not permit dual
          nationality; and
          Its a long way to go and I have seen some of them lost US Citizenship, being a dual nationals.

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          • #6
            I can't imagine that anyone would be dumb enough to consider giving up their American citizenship. Australia is a great country, but not good enough to renounce your citizenship for. In any event, if your son and daughter-in-law were to consider moving to Australia, then your son would initially obtain Australian Permanent Residency. After a certain number of years, he would be eligible for Australian citizenship, but would not be under any obligation to do so.

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            • #7
              Australia is a country of criminal descendants and they s c r e w their sheep

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              • #8
                See http://www.richw.org/dualcit/faq.html

                One can be a dual national of the U.S. and Australia.

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                • #9
                  Here is what I found..

                  A U.S. citizen may acquire foreign citizenship by marriage, or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth.U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship.

                  Source:

                  http://www.uscitizenship.info/usciti...al-citizen.htm

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                  • #10
                    What you found is incorrect: INA Chapter 3 "Loss of Nationality".
                    Sec. 349{8 U.S.C. 1481} give very clear answers to the questions: "LOSS OF NATIONALITY BY NATIVE BORN OR NATURALIZED CITIZEN"
                    It has a good number of sections in the INA and well as in the 7 FAM of the DOS, which has been applied overseas by the Consular Officer.
                    Also say's under title of Sec(a) No national of the United States can lose United States nationality, under this Act While within United States or any of its outlying possessions of any of the acts or the fulfillment of any of the conditions specified in this chapter.

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                    • #11
                      Hey, SUNDEVIL, Have you ever been to Australia? If so, where?

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                      • #12
                        No, I have never been to Australia. I have traveled with Australians before, in S.E. Asia, and they're great people - almost as good as Americans.

                        I have great respect for Australia because they are strong allies of the United States. Furthermore, I hear that they have a very strong and diversified economy. I'm happy that I chose to immigrate to America, as we are the best country in the world...but I think that Australia might have been a good second choice.

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                        • #13
                          Sundevil quote "No, I have never been to Australia"

                          you are in No position to say another country isn't good enough for anything if you haven't been to that country.


                          This is exactly why ....Sundevil quote"I can't imagine that anyone would be dumb enough to consider giving up their American citizenship"

                          It really is because you 'cant' imagine

                          You have absolutely no idea!

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                          • #14
                            Michael Lover: With all due respect, I was giving my opinion. The last time I checked, this is still allowed.

                            It is also my opinion that America is the best country in the world...therefore, it presupposes that I don't believe that the gaining of Australian citizenship is worth the losing of American citizenship.

                            Furthermore, I did not say that "another country isn't good enough for anything." Please don't put words in my mouth.

                            If you read my posts carefully...you can read, can't you?...you will see that I say very positive things about Australia. If I didn't have respect for Australia, I would have made this very clear...but, you will see that I have a very high regard for the country.

                            I do not have a high regard for you, however.

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                            • #15
                              You need to read my post more carefully, it seems you are the one that can't read.I'll explain....


                              Eg.You are in no position to say that my left leg is longer than my right if you haven't measured each of them.

                              This sentence doesn't say that you actually said those things. Either does my original post, i but english isn't your first language, keep trying though, i've seen worse

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