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NEED SOME INFO ON DEPORTATION

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  • NEED SOME INFO ON DEPORTATION

    Ok i hear so many different things here and there but can anyone please clarify for me that once a person has been deported from the U.S. He or she can not enter back to the states under NO circumstances until the bar for the 10 years is met??? Someone i know got deported and is going to marry his us citizen gf.

  • #2
    Ok i hear so many different things here and there but can anyone please clarify for me that once a person has been deported from the U.S. He or she can not enter back to the states under NO circumstances until the bar for the 10 years is met??? Someone i know got deported and is going to marry his us citizen gf.

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    • #3
      They can file a waiver, actually probably 2.

      They need to show extreme hardship to the GF.

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      • #4
        Tell this person to go to their US Embassy to the country where he/she was deported and ask for a 9BII Visa the y what it is. It must provide with a full explanation, but the US Embassy people may able to help

        Every case is different

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        • #5
          dear bsanchez: there is no such thing as a 9BII visa....9B2 is a category of ineligibility (and you should know this one by heart, since you are a visa cheat)...

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          • #6
            they can apply for waivers, it is more than one waiver I think. there are some different web sites can help you to know, check them.

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            • #7
              I know a lady who got blamed for credit card fraud . She went to jail and afterward deported to her own country three years later she met an American citizen and married him. He brought her back to the US and within a month she had the GC in her hand.

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              • #8
                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Richardt64:
                I know a lady who got blamed for credit card fraud . She went to jail and afterward deported to her own country three years later she met an American citizen and married him. He brought her back to the US and within a month she had the GC in her hand. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                And that is pretty sad, based on her criminal background. It's these kind of stories that grate on my last nerve. We have deserving, upstanding people waiting in line, and some criminal gets in ahead of them. What good is she going to do this country? Probably more of the same.

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                • #9
                  the criminal got deported and now want to come back? what kind of b.s. is this? like I told you before, thanks to the bleeding heart attorneys my country is an *** wipe for every criminal in the world.
                  to Rambo and every damm illegal alien in the U.S. GET THE HELL OUT OF HERE!!! Your own countries are supposed to support you, THEY have an OBLIGATION with you, not us, when will you get it thru your sick skulls. We have MILLIONS of people who SHOULD

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                  • #10
                    As of 2005, it is estimated by the government that there are as many as 1 million illegal immigrants in Malaysia, a substantial number of them hailing from Indonesia, Malaysia's poorer neighbour. The government announced plans to forcibly repatriate as many illegal immigrants as possible, with harsh punishments "” including steep fines and heavy whippings "” imposed on those who disobeyed or aided illegal immigrants in their efforts to remain in Malaysia. The original deadline set was February 1 2005; by this date, 400,000 had already left voluntarily. Those who refuse to leave voluntarily and employers who hire them will face whipping, jail or fines if they are caught. The crackdown would be Malaysia's largest blitz to flush out illegal immigrants in three years. A similar nationwide sweep was carried out in 2002. In January 19, 1998, Thai Prime Minister Chuan Leekpai approved a proposal to expel the estimated 986,000 illegal foreign workers in Thailand.

                    The Japan's Immigration Bureau bureau began soliciting tips over the Internet about suspected illegal aliens, enlisting the public in a high-profile deportation campaign ordered by authorities who say foreigners are to blame for a surge in crime in Japan. "What's next "” paid informers?" asked Osvaldo Yamamoto, 30, a welder from Brazil. "Nobody wants to overstay their visa, but everybody wants a chance to work. Reporting on these people is a worse crime." The online tip-off system, which started in February, is the latest in a series of measures announced by authorities in a campaign to halve the estimated 250,000 illegal aliens in Japan. The revised Immigration Control and Refugee Recognition Act (implemented in 1990) maintained Japan's long-standing ban on unskilled foreign workers and imposed tough penalties (fines of up to two million yen"”about $20,000"”or prison terms of up to three years) on those employers and labor brokers who knowing recruit and hire illegal aliens. Yoko Nakamura, a 52-year-old woman in Tokyo, said that living in Europe and Australia had shown her the advantages of Japan's uniformity. "Everyone has the same hair colour and the same eye colour. You feel maybe the guy next to you is feeling the same way, so it's a good feeling to be homogenous," she said.

                    Japanese society is linguistically and culturally homogeneous with only small populations of foreign workers, Zainichi Koreans, Japanese Chinese and Japanese Brazilians. Approximately 98.6% of the population is pure Japanese, unheard of for a first world country, and 99% of the population speaks Japanese as their first language. Japanese citizenship is conferred jus sanguinis, and monolingual Japanese-speaking minorities (Koreans, Chinese) often reside in Japan for generations under permanent residency status without acquiring japanese citizenship. Japan has been criticized for its reluctance to accept asylum-seekers. In 2002, 250 asylum-seekers applied to the Japanese government for refugee status, but only 14 of them were approved. Refugees recognized by Japan: 305 persons, from January 1982 to January 2002. For example, more than 2.6 million refugees have come to the United States. since 1975. The actual number of admitted refugees rose in subsequent years with refugee ceiling for 2006 at 70,000. Critics note these levels are still among the lowest in 30 years.

                    Angry over recent raids and frustrated with Congress, thousands of people protested across the country Tuesday to demand a path to citizenship for an estimated 12 million illegal immigrants. Melissa Woo, a 22-year-old American citizen who immigrated from South Korea, carried a Korean flag over her shoulder as she criticized politicians for "buckling at the knees." "Us immigrants aren't pieces of trash, we're human beings," she said. "To be treated as less than human is a travesty." However, like their Japanese neighbors, Koreans tend to equate nationality or citizenship with membership in a single, homogeneous ethnic group or "race" (minjok, in Korean). A common language and culture also are viewed as important elements in Korean identity. The idea of multiracial or multiethnic nations, like Australia or the United States, strikes many Koreans as odd or even contradictory. South Korea is a homogeneous society with absolute majority of the population of Korean ethnicity. In 1970, an estimate of 120,000 Chinese resided in South Korea. However, due to economic restrictions by the Korean government, the number fell to around 21,000 Chinese today. South Korea is a major international economic power with the eleventh largest economy in the world, and the third largest in Asia. The South Korean economy is characterized by moderate inflation, low unemployment, an export surplus, and fairly equal distribution of income.

                    May 02, 2007 - Iran today defended its plan to repatriate one million Afghans living illegally in the Islamic Republic and said 50,000 had been sent home since the campaign was launched 11 days ago. "Each country has sensitivities about the presence of illegal citizens on its own territory which has different political, social, economic and security consequences," Iran's Interior Ministry said. During a six-week campaign earlier this year Pakistan repatriated 200,000 unregistered Afghans who had been living in Pakistan. Many of them lived in Pakistan for decades. Millions of Afghans fled to Pakistan and Iran to escape the wars that have devastated Afghanistan since the Soviet invasion of 1979.

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                    • #11
                      Born in 1968 Dan Heiskala is one of approximately 200,000 Korean Adoptees that have come to the United States. He was adopted at the age of 5, yet was never naturalized as a citizen by his a-parents (Adoptive Parents). His legal battle over his illegal status began in 1992 when he was convicted of stealing a truck. Per counseled instruction, he did not testify on his behalf and was found guilty by trial resulting in a 7-10 year sentence. He was let off after around 2 years of prison.

                      The real struggle came, when in 1996 congress enacted a law that essentially deports all non-citizens for criminal records where they are sentenced to 1 year or more of prison time. Under the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRIRA-96), "Virtually all criminal aliens must be detained when they are released from criminal custody. The effective date for this section is April 1, 1997."

                      Had Heiskala been adopted after 2000, the complications of his legal status would have never been questioned. According to the Child Citizen Act of 2000, international adoptees are granted automatic acquisition of citizenship. The law stipulates that, "children born outside the United States and residing permanently in the United States. Similarly, TRA Indian American adoptee Samuel Jonathon Schultz has also faced an uphill battle. Schultz' criminal record combined with un-naturalized status by his a-parents have landed him a chance at being deported back to his motherland of India. Schultz is not only unfamiliar with the language and culture, but claims that his Mormon background will cause him to be religiously persecuted if he is to be deported.

                      While the 2000 adoption legislation marks a historic period where adoptee immigrants gain automatic citizenship in the U.S., thousands more who were adopted before 2000, who've faced criminal charges are facing deportation to countries they are unfamiliar with.

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