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The GOP's immigration shame

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  • The GOP's immigration shame

    Republicans choose divisive campaign politics over urgently needed policy.
    June 21, 2006

    HOW CAN YOU TELL WHEN a governing party is running out of steam? When it controls all branches of government yet abandons even the pretense of addressing an issue most members claim is a "crisis."

    That's what the GOP-led House did Tuesday in announcing that discussions over reconciling its enforcement-centric immigration bill with the Senate's legalization-focused version will be pushed back to September at the earliest, and only after completing more hearings.

    Instead of naming negotiators and attempting in good faith to bridge the chasm between the bills, House leaders are busy naming locations for "field meetings" that can deliver maximum demagogic effect in the run-up to the November election.

    These meetings are nonsense. Congress held more than a dozen hearings on immigration last year before passing HR 4437.

    That punitive bill filled the streets with millions of protesters angry that it did little to address the nation's need for a legal supply of labor or the estimated 11 million-plus illegal residents of this country, besides turning them into felons.

    The Senate version, a flawed piece of work in its own right after too many compromises, at least offered a system (however torturous) by which millions of underground workers could finally come into the open without fear of immediate incarceration or deportation. Most of the last-minute amendments to the Senate bill brought the legislation closer to the version passed by the House. But Republicans there prefer clinging to the dangerous fantasy that a massive, militarized wall must be approved before discussions can even begin over what to do with the millions of indispensable, but vilified, workers already here.

    House GOP leaders can barely conceal their preference for divisive politics over sound policy. Speaker J. Dennis Hastert of Illinois has reportedly conveyed to President Bush that hard-line enforcement politics is polling particularly well this season. One Republican congressional aide told the Associated Press: "The discussion is how to put the Democrats in a box without attacking the president." This is what passes for Republican leadership nowadays.

    Summer and fall will be gut-check time not just for Bush, who has tried in his vague though periodically eloquent way to make immigration reform his signature domestic accomplishment this year, or for pro-reform GOP senators such as John McCain of Arizona, but for the American people. When the vulnerable party in power chooses to adopt a campaign strategy that demonizes a class of people, how it fares will say much about who we are.

    Twelve years ago, Republicans were swept into Congress on a platform bursting with energy and ideas, with many measures enacted within the GOP's first 100 days in power. If inaction and xenophobia are all the party has left, this could be its last 100 days.

  • #2
    If inaction and xenophobia are all the party has left, this could be its last 100 days.
    Great quote.

    There is one more thing to do and it is to go to every latino and immigrants neighborhood nationwide and tell them which party wants them all out, legal or not, they want you all out.

    They seem to forget that the pilgrim, their ancestors also migrated to the US and gave them birth rights to this country.

    Go to every public high school in America and make sure the young 16,17 years old understand who wants to make their family's life as miserable as possible...

    Go to any high school in this country, and you will see a large population of latino students, most of them are children of undocumented parents and energize them and let it be known that their parents will soon be felons and be deported...


    OUR LAST HOPE RESIDE ON THE SHOULDERS OF THOSE KIDS, MANY OF THEM TOO YOUNG TO VOTES SO, THE NEXT FEW YEARS WILL BE VERY VITAL TO EDUCATE THEM ABOUT WHO THE TANCREDO IS, AND WHO DENNIS HASTERT IS, THEY ALL ARE REPUBLICANS THAT HATES LATINOES.

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    • #3
      Of course, the SENATE didn't hold any hearings before passing its piece of garbage. It didn't even know how many people it would let into the country, or what the costs would be. It totally ignored the inability of the federal bureaucracy to handle what it's got now. And it threw in something for every beneficiary of illegal immigration, from amnesty for employers who hire them to a speedy track to citizenship (and votes) for ethnic lobbies to forgiveness of outright crimes such as tax evasion and ID fraud for illegal aliens themselves. This masterpiece of pandering then topped it all off with a last-minute requirement that the GOVERNMENT OF MEXICO be consulted with on a border fence built in our country, on our land, with our funds.

      In other words, the Senate is either the stupidest body on earth, or had the intention all along of making this bill SO unacceptable that it would never be reconciled with the House bill, and would leave the GOP with egg on its face among Latino voters. An unintended consequence--those "immigrant" marches and the mess in the Senate appear to have actually bolstered anti-amnesty Republicans among Americans.

      Comment


      • #4
        And Jean, if what you say about Latino youth is true, then it's just as well we stop the flow of more illegals into this country, and prevent those here from getting citizenship. It is precisely this disregard for the VALUES of this country, namely law and order, which upsets Americans. I wonder if those illegals who have been amnestied in the past see what a big argument against it their support for more amnesty is. We get more legalized residents who believe that it's perfectly OK for our laws to be ignored. Interesting, too, that you frame illegal immigration as a "Latino" issue. Are you suggesting that Latinos are naturally more prone to breaking the law than other groups? Sure sounds like it. Or, do you mean that because they're Latino, they shouldn't have to follow our laws? Could be that, too.

        Many of those kids you're talking about are not American citizens, either, and are unlikely to legalize or vote. In fact, quite a few of them are dropping out of high school, which means in a few years, employers won't need a fresh crop of illegals, because this generation will already be here--if they don't get deported first. The kids who are US citizens will eventually be able to sponsor their families, and if they feel hostility to the US for their parents' actions, well, so what. Their parents CHOSE to violate the law, and frankly, I wonder how many of these kids are going to feel "used"? Would you like to know that the main reason for your birth was to secure your family's life in the US? Chances are good, too, that they'll marry nonHispanics and have decent careers, thanks to the education and opportunity AMERICANS provide. People who get comfortable don't want to change the status quo. Nor do they want to shell out their hard-earned taxes to pay for the support of endless streams of imported poverty.

        Even my sister-in-law of Mexican ancestry understands the poverty that drives illegal immigration, but doesn't agree that it's OK. You see, she grew up poor HERE, she was a blue collar worker until she retired, and two of her sons are now. They've built comfortable lives. They compete directly with illegal aliens and recent immigrants for jobs.

        Comment


        • #5
          Of course, the SENATE didn't hold any hearings before passing its piece of garbage. It didn't even know how many people it would let into the country, or what the costs would be. It totally ignored the inability of the federal bureaucracy to handle what it's got now. And it threw in something for every beneficiary of illegal immigration, from amnesty for employers who hire them to a speedy track to citizenship (and votes) for ethnic lobbies to forgiveness of outright crimes such as tax evasion and ID fraud for illegal aliens themselves. This masterpiece of pandering then topped it all off with a last-minute requirement that the GOVERNMENT OF MEXICO be consulted with on a border fence built in our country, on our land, with our funds.

          In other words, the Senate is either the stupidest body on earth, or had the intention all along of making this bill SO unacceptable that it would never be reconciled with the House bill, and would leave the GOP with egg on its face among Latino voters. An unintended consequence--those "immigrant" marches and the mess in the Senate appear to have actually bolstered anti-amnesty Republicans among Americans.
          Aliba, the Senate had a good bill, not a perfect bill. It did not address some of the core issues involving processing immigration petitions and the divergence between a Consular issued visa and a non-counselar issued visa. It did address the need to increase family based and employment based visas, especially, the E and K visas in particular. However, one of the few things that could have been rectified by the House was to establish a guest worker program without the earned citizenship requirement. It would have placed the Democratic party in a stranglehold with immigration. In particular, the labor unions, who generally do not support temporary visa worker programs, and social conservative democrats who support some form of a guest worker program of some sort. It would have also pitted the Republican party into a new threshold. Enforcement only Republicans like Rep Sensenbrenner and Rep Tancredo with that of Rep Lamar Smith.
          "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

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