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  • Confused and desperate

    Hello

    I am a British citizern married to an American currently serving in the Airforce. We are based overseas.

    I am in the process of getting my green card. We are going to the States for a two week vacation in December and I hope to complete my green card application at this time.

    We are flying into Chicago and then from there to Pittsbugh.

    Do I have to submit my paperwork in Chicago, or can I do in in Pittsbugh? Do I have to arrive between certain time to get the paperwork sorted out? Do the offices that deal with immigration at the airport close at 5pm??

    I am completely lost. Can anyone help me??

    Also I have been told that I can finish my application when I go to the States for a vacation. Is this true or do I have to arrive in the States with the intention of living there? Are the rules different because I am a military spouse and based overseas?

    Do I get a social security number when i arrive, or do i have to apply??

    Sorry for all the questions. I hope somebody has some answers.

    Laura

  • #2
    Hello

    I am a British citizern married to an American currently serving in the Airforce. We are based overseas.

    I am in the process of getting my green card. We are going to the States for a two week vacation in December and I hope to complete my green card application at this time.

    We are flying into Chicago and then from there to Pittsbugh.

    Do I have to submit my paperwork in Chicago, or can I do in in Pittsbugh? Do I have to arrive between certain time to get the paperwork sorted out? Do the offices that deal with immigration at the airport close at 5pm??

    I am completely lost. Can anyone help me??

    Also I have been told that I can finish my application when I go to the States for a vacation. Is this true or do I have to arrive in the States with the intention of living there? Are the rules different because I am a military spouse and based overseas?

    Do I get a social security number when i arrive, or do i have to apply??

    Sorry for all the questions. I hope somebody has some answers.

    Laura

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    • #3
      www.visajourney.com

      I would have thought your chances of a CR1/IR1 before Decemebr is nil, takes a lot longer.

      and www.uscis.gov

      Comment


      • #4
        Cat21100: We appreciate your husband's service to America!

        In order for someone to give you accurate information, it would be useful to know what documents you have already submitted to USCIS (you say that you're in the process of obtaining your green card)?

        Given that you're based overseas, I'm not sure of the exact process. I do know, however, that for residency purposes, those spouses stationed overseas with their active-duty spouse are still considered to be within the United States.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hello

          I am on the final part of my application. I just have the interview with the American embassy which is in November. I have to submit medical results, police reports etc All of which I have. After that, I have been told that I should get the necessary paperwork to go to the States with in a few weeks.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don`t know what a CR1/IR1 is??

            Do you mean my I-130?? That has all been taken care off. the application process for me seems to be in two halves. The first half I have completed. I had to file an I-130 and a load of other papers with the Embassy. After that I got a letter with a case number on it and instructions for stage two which is an interview with the embassy and another big pile of paperwork.

            Comment


            • #7
              Cat21100: CR-1 is the status given to a person granted Conditional Residency, specifically those who have been married to a U.S. citizen for fewer than two years at the time that residency is gained. IR-1 is the status given to someone who has been granted permanent residency having been sponsored as the immediate relative of a U.S. citizen.

              A decision on your residency application (I-485) should be made at the conclusion of your interview at the U.S. Embassy. If you're successful, you'll be given an immigrant visa.

              You can use this visa within six months to enter the United States. At the port of entry, the officer will admit you as a conditional/permanent resident...and stamp your passport as such. The stamp should be valid for a period of one year, and will allow you to leave and return to the United States. Your Green Card will automatically be ordered, and will be mailed by USCIS to an address within the United States (it should then be sent to you by family at your address).

              To obtain a Social Security number, you will need to take your passport with the stamp noting your status to any Social Security office. They will then send you a card within two weeks. You should note, however, that until your admission to the U.S. as an immigrant has been entered into the USCIS computers, you shouldn't go to the Social Security office, as they will be unable to assist you. It's my understanding that this takes a couple of weeks.

              Comment


              • #8
                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SunDevilUSA:
                Cat21100: CR-1 is the status given to a person granted Conditional Residency, specifically those who have been married to a U.S. citizen for fewer than two years at the time that residency is gained. IR-1 is the status given to someone who has been granted permanent residency having been sponsored as the immediate relative of a U.S. citizen.. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
                CR-1 and IR-1 are visas. Once a person with that visa enters the USA, she/he becomes permanent resident.
                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SunDevilUSA:
                A decision on your residency application (I-485) should be made at the conclusion of your interview at the U.S. Embassy. </div></BLOCKQUOTE> I-485 is only used for adjustment of status if applicant is in the USA. So, not to confuse cat.. you don't need that..

                As for SSN, one form you submited to the embassy asks if you want SSN to be assigned to you and card sent... if you checked that box, you'll get SS card in the mail after becoming permanent resident.

                Cat, if you receive CR-1 or IR-1 visa, you'll be "processed" for permanent residency at the "point of entry" into the USA (airport) (as Sun DevilUSA described). And yes, they do work past 5pm...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Aneri: Yes, you are correct - CR-1 and CR-2 are visa classifications relating to immigrant visas. However, a person entering with a CR-1 visa is technically a Conditional Permanent Resident (because they have been married for less than two years at the time permanent residency is attained). A Conditional Resident must then apply for the removal of conditions ninety days before the second anniversary of obtaining residency (I-751).

                  A person entering with an IR-1 visa status is granted Permanent Resident status without conditions.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    well, I have been married for more than two year which seem to be good news.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thank you for for the clarification.

                      Going back to my original question. It looks like you are saying that Chicago will be my port of entry.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Cat21100: Yes, according to your original post, Chicago will be your port-of-entry, and your immigrant visa (assuming successful interview) will be processed there.

                        It is good news that you've been married for more than two years. This means that, given a successful interview, you'll be given an IR-1 immigrant visa, and will be granted permanent residence upon arrival in America. Unlike Conditional Residents, you won't have to apply for the removal of conditions after two years!!!

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