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  • German boy will get to stay

    Despite entering on a VWP he is STILL here and now they are putting a special law through congress just for him! Why? Because the law is being eroded to something that resembles mo*b rule. If you have a big enough s*ob story and the media picks it up you can stay. Meanwhile those who follow the law are being tossed aside as if they had done something wrong.

    Sad commentary for the state of country. I thought we lived in a republic not a m*ob-ruled democracy

  • #2
    Despite entering on a VWP he is STILL here and now they are putting a special law through congress just for him! Why? Because the law is being eroded to something that resembles mo*b rule. If you have a big enough s*ob story and the media picks it up you can stay. Meanwhile those who follow the law are being tossed aside as if they had done something wrong.

    Sad commentary for the state of country. I thought we lived in a republic not a m*ob-ruled democracy

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    • #3
      Lots of people have special laws introduced into Congress (I suspect it's mainly to appease the press and public) but rarely do they pass. The main thing is that, from what I can tell, having a bill introduced on their behalf pretty much buys the alien time (time for Congress to pass the Dream Act or an amnesty, supposedly).

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      • #4
        Private Bills almost always pass.
        Search for Private Bills introduced in past and see how many have passed.

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        • #5
          That's directly contrary to what I've heard, AF.

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          • #6
            And what I usually hear from you is directly contrary to facts

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            • #7
              On the contrary, AF, I'm usually right, and can back up what I say. Some facts for you, AF:

              http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/immigra...n/Chapter4.doc

              "While keeping these benefits in mind, it is important to understand that very few privately introduced immigration bills ever gain congressional approval. For example, in the 77th Congress (1941B42), 22 of 430 private immigration bills were passed, in the 98th Congress (1983-84) 33 of 454 bills were passed, and in the 104th Congress (1995B96), that number was 2 of 27. Given these statistics, one may question the feasibility of a private bill for most non-citizens seeking relief from removal (formerly Adeportation@) or other benefits. Despite the low likelihood of success, there has been an increase in requests for private bills as a result of the severe hardships caused by the 1996 Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA). The 105th Congress (1997-98) had 67 private immigration bills introduced, but passed only 9. The number of private bills nearly doubled for the 106th Congress (1999-2000), which passed only 19 of 121 bills. Strikingly, the 107th Congress (2001-02) passed only 1 of 85 private bills.

              In the past, however, the introduction of these bills was almost as important as their passage. Formerly, the mere introduction of a private immigration bill would automatically cause the INS to halt deportation activity during the bill's pendency. See United States ex rel. Knauff v. McGrath (2d Cir.1950). After a private bill was introduced, the House or Senate Judiciary Committee would request a report from the INS on the non-citizen who was the subject of the bill. According to Operations Instruction 107.1c, a stay of deportation would be generally authorized by the INS when it received a committee's report request. If a bill was introduced early in a session of Congress, it could have effectively gained the non-citizen a stay of deportation for the remainder of the session (up to two years) with no further action being taken. Also, it was not uncommon for a Representative or Senator to reintroduce an expired private bill at the beginning of the next Congress, thereby continuing the stay of deportation.

              As the effectiveness of these tactics in delaying removal became apparent, private legislation grew in popularity. By the 90th Congress (1967B68), 7,293 private immigration bills were introduced; 218 were enacted..."

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              • #8
                They are turning this kid into the next Rosa Parks and it makes me a little ill. Plato would have had a field day with this example. I mean what can be said of a Republic that pases laws but only enforces them selectively? What can be said of a Republic that bases its law on the top story of the six o'clock news?

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                • #9
                  This is a Historical Day, AliBa !!

                  For the first time EVER you were Right!

                  And, as you see, I concede it !

                  _________________________

                  ..In the past, however, the introduction of these bills was almost as important as their passage. Formerly, the mere introduction of a private immigration bill would automatically cause the INS to halt deportation activity during the bill's pendency. See United States ex rel. Knauff v. McGrath (2d Cir.1950). After a private bill was introduced, the House or Senate Judiciary Committee would request a report from the INS on the non-citizen who was the subject of the bill. According to Operations Instruction 107.1c, a stay of deportation would be generally authorized by the INS when it received a committee's report request. If a bill was introduced early in a session of Congress, it could have effectively gained the non-citizen a stay of deportation for the remainder of the session (up to two years) with no further action being taken. Also, it was not uncommon for a Representative or Senator to reintroduce an expired private bill at the beginning of the next Congress, thereby continuing the stay of deportation.

                  As the effectiveness of these tactics in delaying removal became apparent, private legislation grew in popularity. By the 90th Congress (1967B68), 7,293 private immigration bills were introduced; 218 were enacted. Because of this volume, 4,896 of these private bills were still pending at the end of that Congress. These numbers led the House of Representatives to tighten considerably the requirements for the introduction and consideration of private bills. Most significantly, the previously commonplace requests for INS reports on non-citizens after private bill introduction were restricted to cases involving extreme hardship. An earlier decision, Roumeliotis v. INS (7th Cir.1962) had established that there was no right to a stay of deportation without such a request for a report from the INS.

                  For a time, the Senate refused to follow the House of Representatives' lead, but in 1981, the Senate approved rules similar to those enacted by the House of Representatives. These rules were a significant factor in bringing the number of private bills introduced down to 27 in the 104th Congress (1995B96).

                  <SCPIO>' 4B3.3<ECPIO>

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                  • #10
                    Oh, HAPPY DAY! AF ADMITS HE WAS WRONG!

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                    • #11
                      I always do - IF I AM WRONG!

                      How about YOU, AliBa?

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                      • #12
                        I do, WHEN I'M WRONG, which is rarely because I usually take the trouble to check my facts first (or am pretty darn sure about what I've read already).

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                        • #13
                          Sugarpuff, would you please post a link to the story you're talking about. It hasn't made the media where I'm at and a search on Google isn't turning it up.

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                          • #14
                            I do, WHEN I'M WRONG, which is rarely because I usually take the trouble to check my facts first (or am pretty darn sure about what I've read already).
                            Just read what you have written in your posts under "Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act", all the way from page 2 through the 7

                            You would have tens of times admitted to being wrong IF you were to admit it when you were wrong.

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                            • #15
                              The story is out of Cleveland Ohio where the boy lives. Here is a link to a Cleveland news site:

                              www.newsnet5.com

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