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  • False claim to US citizenship

    In 1993 I was on F-1 visa attending CSU (California State University) campus A then dropped out. The same year (1993) I applied at campus B of the CSU as a citizen and was admitted. After one year I dropped out. Now I am a permanent resident and attending community college. I expect to transfer to CSU campus C soon. Would the CSU campuses share records? Would campus C know that I was in campus B if I don’t report it on the application?

  • #2
    In 1993 I was on F-1 visa attending CSU (California State University) campus A then dropped out. The same year (1993) I applied at campus B of the CSU as a citizen and was admitted. After one year I dropped out. Now I am a permanent resident and attending community college. I expect to transfer to CSU campus C soon. Would the CSU campuses share records? Would campus C know that I was in campus B if I don’t report it on the application?

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    • #3
      Quite honestly, in this case, what California State University knows might cause you REAL TROUBLE...and not only with the university.

      Do you know the consequences of a false claim to U.S. citizenship?

      If not, you may want to find out.

      When you applied for your permanent residency, did you lie when asked if you had ever made a claim to U.S. citizenship?

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      • #4
        lying is not good , it is never good . Why would you say ,you were a citizen ?

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        • #5
          Thank you for the answer. Now I am aware of the consequences if it was done after 1996 but in my case it was in 1993 and not to get benefits under INA. doesn't this make a difference?

          And no at the time I didn't know of the consequences.

          I don't recall being asked about this during the adjustment of status. I know there is a question on the N-400 though...

          So, what do you experts suggest I do?

          Thanks

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          • #6
            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">And no at the time I didn't know of the consequences. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

            But you knew the benefits?

            The form does not ask if you knew the consequences but rather if you lied to gain benefit. In this case, it looks like it.

            You see, this is the problem with lying. Now you have to decide if you should lie about your lie. Very soon it will become lie to the power of thousands up to the point where your head cannot grasp everything you have lied about and then you will come down crashing.

            One thing for sure, if you say you lied to gain benefit, then say goodbye to citizenship. On the other hand, if you lie again, then you might get a ctizenship that is loosely revocable. That means, you will never have peace of mind again, always looking over your shoulder.

            That is the true cost of lying. Sounds harsh, but sorry that is the reality you are in now. So, bend over and take it like a man.

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            • #7
              As I read it, It appears that the benefit wasn't for Immigration purposes so the issue isn't so bad as it at first seems. The wording on question 23 for N-400 is:

              "Have you ever given false or misleading information to any US Government official while applying for any immigration benefit or to prevent deportation, exclusion or removal?"

              He did neither. His lie was on a University application for the purpose of (I'll guess) cheaper fees (in-State vs out of State). There is no such question on the I-485 form.

              It's a bit like somebody claiming to be a USC when playing a State lottery game. There's no immigration benefit from doing so.
              "What you see in the photograph isn't what you saw at the time. The real skill of photography is organized visual lying."

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              • #8
                ...the reason for the false claim to U.S. citizenship is irrelevant.

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                • #9
                  don't worry....just turn to the Book of Fredy, thump three times and all will be forgiven...right fredy???

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                  • #10
                    Brit5064 Question number one is the one I am concerned about. it reads:

                    1. Have you ever claimed to be a US citizen (in writing or any other way)?

                    I remember they used to specify if your claim was before 1996 or so, but it looks like the form has changed...

                    Any ideas?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">It appears that the benefit wasn't for Immigration purposes so the issue isn't so bad </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                      Uhm.. Brit, I think it depends on how one defines immigration benefit. What is it?
                      Qualifying for a federal student loan is clearly an immigration benefit. Without the proper immigration status you cant qualify.
                      Running for office is an immigration benefit.
                      Getting a US passport is an immigration benefit.

                      So if someone lied to profit from any federally sponsored programs that are solely reserved for us citizens, that person has lied for immigration benefit.

                      But I can see how you can interpret "immigration benefit" as "getting some sort of legal status with regard to immigration".

                      Anyway, I think the person has restricted his/her options in life. Because that lie is always going to be stuck in his head. And because of it, there might be many opportunities he will have to pass up because of the fear that someone could find out. Say 20 yrs down the road s/je wants to run for office. It will be a matter of time for an opponent to dig dirt on him and find out that he lied on his school application. At that point, we will be talking about deportation, not him/her getting elected.

                      One thing people dont realize, the truth always prevails. Even if people you lied to do not find out, somehow later you will pay the price for it.

                      Tell the truth under any circumstances.

                      For this particular case, maybe you can say that the school administrator is not a government official.

                      But in the future, DO NOT LIE!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> I expect to transfer to CSU campus C soon. Would the CSU campuses share records? Would campus C know that I was in campus B if I don’t report it on the application? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                        Wait a minute, I read Zammoor's post more carefully. Actually, he's not worried at all. He's trying to find another flaw in the system so that he can exploit once again.

                        Sorry, this is not the right forum for your scam.

                        I am done with this topic.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well I agree Kumna, telling a lie is never a good thing, especially for immigration to the USA. The immigration benefit could be interpreted in different ways but in his case, it's not a direct immigration benefit, like crossing the border into the USA, for working here or obtaining a driver license. Of course the USCIS might not accept that and it could come back to haunt him later on.
                          "What you see in the photograph isn't what you saw at the time. The real skill of photography is organized visual lying."

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                          • #14
                            Kumna, I am not trying to exploit the system again. I am simply trying to find out about the situation and how to manage what has happened 17 years ago that's all.

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                            • #15
                              This should answer your question.

                              False Claim to U.S. Citizenship and its Unintended Consequences
                              In yet another example of the possible later effects and great dangers of falsely claiming U.S. citizenship, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals has remanded a case involving an adjustment of status applicant who is married to a U.S. citizen but who falsely claimed to be a U.S. citizen back in 1998 in order to gain admission to Drexel University as a part-time, evening program. The applicant is in removal proceedings and the government is claiming that he is inadmissible (and therefore cannot adjust his status to permanent residency) because of his prior false claim to U.S. citizenship. The case is Ismail v. Gonzales.

                              Under the law (INA §212(a)(6)(C)(ii)(I)) person who "falsely represents, or has falsely represented, himself or herself to be a citizen of the United States for any purpose or benefit under this chapter or any other Federal or State law is inadmissible."

                              The immigration judge ruled that the applicant received a "benefit" under state law when he enrolled as a Drexel student and therefore he is inadmissible and ineligible for adjustment of status. On appeal, the BIA upheld the decision of the IJ but on different grounds -- that the applicant’s false claim had been made to accomplish the "purpose" of gaining admission to college. The Federal Court has remanded the case to the BIA so that it can decide whether the false claim to U.S. citizenship was made to gain a benefit under state or federal law.

                              The Federal Court did this because under the same court’s opinion in Theodros v. Gonzales, it held that an applicant for adjustment who had made a prior false claim to U.S. citizenship in order to gain employment in the private sector was, in fact, inadmissible and not eligible for adjustment because private employment is a “benefit” under state law. The court’s remand was so that the BIA could consider its decision in light of Theodros.

                              While the BIA will now reconsider the case, the bottom line is that it is a big mistake for any alien to falsely claim U.S. citizenship. It is a violation of the law and, as we can see in this case, in Theodros and in other cases, it is a mistake that can come back and haunt an applicant years later in circumstances (such as trying to adjust status based on a bona fide marriage to a U.S. citizen) that otherwise would be a straightforward application for permanent residence.

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