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Advice on Driving to Mexico & border living

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  • Advice on Driving to Mexico & border living

    Hi friends. If anybody has been following my situation, you'll know that my husband is illegal from Mexico. He entered without inspection back in '98, we were married in '02, our I-130 was approved this April and I had to file an I-824, which is still pending and, according to processing times, will be pending for quite some time. Once the I-824 goes through and he eventually gets his interview, he'll be denied due to the ten-year bar and I'll have to file the I-601. I recently contacted the consulate in Ciudad Juarez and they informed me that since the I-130 hasn't arrived there, we are still eligible to get the K-3 and I can file the I-601 when the K-3 gets denied. I graduated college this May, so there's nothing left to really hold us here. We are eager to get the process going, so we've decided to try the K-3 route. We have given notice in our jobs and are starting to make arrangements to go to Mexico. Since I will have to file the I-601, I need to maintain a residence in the United States. For this reason, we've decided to move to the border. I plan to work in a US border town and rent a room. My husband will be living right on the other side so I can go see him whenever I want.

    We are going to go to Ciudad Juarez. We currently live in northern California (north of Sacramento). We want to take the quickest freeway route to El Paso then cross there. We are weary of "checkpoints," however. It would be too ironic if my husband got deported on his way home. We want to avoid any areas where there might be border patrol agents. We would be taking the I-5 to San Diego then going from there to El Paso. Anyone drivent these routes? The furthest I've ever been is LA.

    Also, does anyone have any experience or advice in regards to border living.
    Have a nice day

  • #2
    Hi friends. If anybody has been following my situation, you'll know that my husband is illegal from Mexico. He entered without inspection back in '98, we were married in '02, our I-130 was approved this April and I had to file an I-824, which is still pending and, according to processing times, will be pending for quite some time. Once the I-824 goes through and he eventually gets his interview, he'll be denied due to the ten-year bar and I'll have to file the I-601. I recently contacted the consulate in Ciudad Juarez and they informed me that since the I-130 hasn't arrived there, we are still eligible to get the K-3 and I can file the I-601 when the K-3 gets denied. I graduated college this May, so there's nothing left to really hold us here. We are eager to get the process going, so we've decided to try the K-3 route. We have given notice in our jobs and are starting to make arrangements to go to Mexico. Since I will have to file the I-601, I need to maintain a residence in the United States. For this reason, we've decided to move to the border. I plan to work in a US border town and rent a room. My husband will be living right on the other side so I can go see him whenever I want.

    We are going to go to Ciudad Juarez. We currently live in northern California (north of Sacramento). We want to take the quickest freeway route to El Paso then cross there. We are weary of "checkpoints," however. It would be too ironic if my husband got deported on his way home. We want to avoid any areas where there might be border patrol agents. We would be taking the I-5 to San Diego then going from there to El Paso. Anyone drivent these routes? The furthest I've ever been is LA.

    Also, does anyone have any experience or advice in regards to border living.
    Have a nice day

    Comment


    • #3
      Ooooooooh! The Mexican Underground Railroad!

      Only cause I likes ya, glue, will I help ya.

      First of all, you're nuts!

      Don't you know about the big time serial killer problem there?
      Sweet Madame Belu

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah, I had to write a research paper on Maquiladoras and I read all about the unexplained killings.....

        We just want to get the ball rolling. There are a lot of things to fear in Mexico, but at least deportation is not one of them.
        Have a nice day

        Comment


        • #5
          Make sure your car is in good repair, spare tire, jack, tools, two and three inch rubber hoses, clamps, first aid kit, lots of water, snacks, and clothes that will protect you from the sun.
          Sweet Madame Belu

          Comment


          • #6
            Got it covered. You ever been to the border, Jo?
            Have a nice day

            Comment


            • #7
              Question Gluhbirne,

              Can you obtain the I-130 forms on the internet somewhere?

              Comment


              • #8
                Nope. Texas and So. Cal. via Interstate 10. Lots of jackaloupe out there.
                Sweet Madame Belu

                Comment


                • #9
                  Angie,

                  Yes. I believe you can get them on the immigration website. www.uscis.gov

                  Under immigration form, fees...

                  Actually G - Jo does have a good point. If you end up staying in Ciudad Juarez, avoid taking buses without your husband (especially at night) and avoid being anywhere other than in your own car at night while alone. Hopefully, if you work in El Paso your husband will be able to meet you at the border when you return or something!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wear cowboy boots.

                    Rattlesnakes, scorpions, tarantulas, oh my!
                    Sweet Madame Belu

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I-5. all the way to mexico -- there's no border patrol. Nuttin'. Only going North on I-5 is there a permanent border patrol stop.

                      Just take it to san ysidro and cross over. He's now finally *legal*.

                      -= nav =-

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I-5 serial killer was caught!
                        Sweet Madame Belu

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Gluhbirne,

                          I'm curious about this statement you made:

                          <QUOTE>
                          Since I will have to file the I-601, I need to maintain a residence in the United States.
                          </QUOTE>

                          I'm in the same situation as you (awaiting approval of I-130 for EWI husband) and we have an experienced immigration lawyer. He said it should be fine if I plan to stay with my husband in Mexico while the waiver is being processed.

                          I'm just wondering if you heard something different?

                          Esperanza

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Esperanza. There is nothing that says that you cannot live in your partners country of origin while going though the I-601 process. However, the purpose of the I-601 is to prove that it would be a hardship for you (the USC/LPR) to live in the other country (aka not in the USA). For many people arguments in regards to their house, job, schooling, medical care, etc would be lost to some degree if they move to the other country (i.e. cannot still have job or be in school in the USA if you are living in another country).

                            I, however, did move (temporarily) to my husband's country while the I-601 was being filed. However, I was still paying tuition and taking research hours in the USA, and my time in said country was limited and the officials knew it.

                            If you have a strong enough hardship argument without factors like a job, then you should be fine even if you are living in the other country.

                            Have you looked at the I-601 section on www.immigrate2us.net? There are a lot of people there (including Gluhbirne and myself) that have gone through or are going through the I-601 process. You can probably get a lot of opinions/help - which may help you to supplement advice from your lawyer or determine which avenues you want to take!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for all your helpful replies We're still in our preparation phase. I'm trying to prepare myself emotionally and mentally. I'm sure I'll experience some sort of culture shock no matter what, but I hope the research I've been doing lately will help to ease the transition a little bit. My husband may experience a bit of "re-entry shock" himself. I got re-entry shock pretty bad when I came home from my year as an exchange student in Germany...........English sounded REALLY ugly to me for the first few days. LOL It's funny when I think about it now.

                              We purchased a laptop computer last night so that I'll be able to keep all my immigration information close at hand, even when we're on the road. I'll try to keep all you guys updated on my pending adventure.
                              Have a nice day

                              Comment



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