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  • MEXICO MELTDOWN: KIDNAPPINGS AT THE BORDER

    5 January 2008

    Mexico Meltdown: First Update of 2008
    [Brenda Walker] @ 8:09 pm [Email author] [Email This Article] [Print This Article]

    Mexico continues its descent toward becoming a failed state. The latest victim is the integrity of the electoral process as the narco-cartels remind candidates of the syndicates' growing power.

    MEXICO CITY, Jan. 4 "” Drug cartels are trying to influence the outcomes of major elections in Mexico by kidnapping and threatening candidates, according to Mexican Attorney General Eduardo Medina Mora.

    The remarks by Medina Mora, released by his office Friday, underscored the Mexican government's growing willingness in recent months to acknowledge the threat drug cartels pose to the nation's fragile democracy. The problem is most severe, Medina Mora said, in the border states of Baja California and Tamaulipas, and in Michoacan, the home state of Mexican President Felipe Calderon.

    "We have evidence, complaints from candidates who were kidnapped or intimidated, or who received threats intended to influence the results of an election and the behavior of candidates," Medina Mora told the Spanish newspaper El Pais, according to a transcript of the interview.

    [Mexican Drug Cartels Threaten Elections, Washington Post, Jan 4, 2008]

    The latest uptick in cartel crimes indicates that Presidente Calderon's campaign against the drug lords is not going well. The escalation shows one reason why he put the squeeze on Bush for $1.4 billion in military aid, which will be stolen or squandered if history is any indicator.

    Keep in mind that at the same time as Washington is moving forward to deliver over a billion taxpayer dollars to ultra-corrupt Mexico, it recently pulled the plug on funding for the border fence.

    Furthermore, Mexico is losing a lot of money because American travelers are choosing to forego beautiful tropical sunsets to avoid worsening danger: Mexican violence driving away U.S. tourists (Houston Chronicle, Jan 5, 2008).


    PLAYAS DE ROSARITO, Mexico "” Assaults on American tourists have brought hard times to hotels and restaurants that dot Mexican beaches just south of the border from San Diego.

    Surfers and kayakers are frightened to hit the waters of the northern stretch of Mexico's Baja California peninsula, long popular as a weekend destination for U.S. tourists. Weddings have been canceled. Lobster joints a few steps from the Pacific were almost empty on the usually busy New Year's weekend.

    Americans have long tolerated shakedowns by police who boost salaries by pulling over motorists for alleged traffic violations, and tourists know parts of Baja are a hotbed of drug-related violence. But a handful of attacks since summer by masked, armed bandits "” some of whom used flashing lights to appear like police "” marks a new extreme that has spooked even longtime visitors.

    Lori Hoffman, a San Diego-area emergency room nurse, said she was sexually assaulted Oct. 23 by two masked men in front of her boyfriend, San Diego Surfing Academy owner Pat Weber, who was forced to kneel at gunpoint for 45 minutes. They were at a campground with about 30 tents, some 200 miles south of the border.

    The men shot out windows of the couple's trailer and forced their way inside, ransacked the cupboards and left with about $7,000 worth of gear, including computers, video equipment and a guitar.

    With Mexico as a neighbor, we need a fence and the military on the border to keep out the worsening crime and narco-violence.
    Wolves Travel In Packs
    ____________________

  • #2
    17 December 2007

    Kidnapping (or Worse) Fought Off by Arizona Woman

    25 September 2007

    All Quiet on the Southern Front
    [Steve Sailer] @ 2:07 am [Email author] [Email This Article] [Print This Article]
    Jay Root of McClatchy Newspapers reports on the latest doings in Mexico. As a reader points out, perhaps one reason American newspapers don't cover Mexico much is because it was the second most dangerous country in the world for journalists in 2006, following only Iraq.

    .. gangland-style executions have surged, with the report counting 1,588 in the first half of 2007. For the full year of 2001, there were 1,080 such crimes, the report said.

    Mexico's violence is often spectacular and lurid, with tales of street shootouts, decapitations and bomb blasts filling Mexico's news pages and airwaves. No place is immune, including the buildings of the country's news outlets.

    In May a severed head wrapped in newspaper was left in a cooler outside the office of Tabasco Hoy in Villahermosa, where drug violence is on the rise. Grenades have been tossed into newsrooms from Cancun to Nuevo Laredo in the past 18 months. The Paris-based organization Reporters Without Borders reported that Mexico was the most dangerous country for journalists in 2006, after Iraq.

    On May 14, suspected drug traffickers on motorcycles gunned down Jose Nemesio Lugo, a senior federal investigator in charge of gathering intelligence on drug traffickers, in Mexico City's upscale Coyoacan neighborhood. Two days later in Sonora state, about 20 miles south of Arizona, a five-hour shootout between heavily armed commandos and police left 20 people dead.

    The bloodbath continued unabated this month, with the assassinations of two state police chiefs. The first was Jaime Flores of San Luis Potosi state, shot in the head multiple times in front of his wife on Sept. 13. Then on Wednesday came news that Marcos Manuel Souberville, the state police chief in Hidalgo, had fallen in a hail of bullets during an afternoon drive-by shooting.

    Many prominent Mexicans have sought refuge in the United States, but that is no guarantee of safety. Mario Espinoza Lobato, a businessman and city councilman from Ciudad Acuna, was gunned down Wednesday at his home in neighboring Del Rio, Texas, authorities said. He was an outspoken critic of the criminal gangs that he said had tried to kidnap him.

    Kidnapping is a multi-million dollar industry in Mexico. The report from Congress indicates there are about 4,500 kidnappings a year, about a third of which are reported. Greg Bangs, head of the kidnapping and ransom unit at the Chubb Group of Insurance Companies, said Mexico has rocketed past Colombia to become the world's ransom capital.

    "Mexico is now very definitely No. 1 in the world in terms of the numbers of kidnappings," Bangs said. "Kidnappers are indicating how serous they are by sending parts of ears and noses and fingers and various bodily parts ... they didn't used to do that so much, but that seems to be more prevalent."

    Top officials here continue to insist their efforts are paying off even if the numbers don't show it. At a news conference last week, Medina, the attorney general, told reporters "there is a decrease" in organized crime murders.

    But then Medina provided figures for "violent executions" in January and February "” 175 and 208, respectively.

    "They're going down?" one reporter asked.

    "I wish they were lower than last year," Medina responded. "But in the first months of this year there were more than in the same period last year."

    Congressman Juan Francisco Rivera, chairman of the Chamber of Deputies Committee on Security, expressed confidence in the government's crime-fighting campaign. He said pointedly that Americans should not be so quick to judge Mexico.

    He described the country's violent crime wave as temporary, while in "cities like Detroit, Houston or Dallas, it has become a permanent thing." Rivera also called on U.S. authorities to do more to stop illicit firearms exports.
    "That's what is killing us," Rivera said. "I think if look at the number of arrests, the number of drug seizures, the number of policemen who have risked their lives and who have been killed, I think it shows that our Army and local police forces are engaged in a frontal battle.'[McClatchy Washington Bureau | 09/22/2007 | Mexico crime continues to surge]

    My fellow Americans: One way you can help the good people of Mexico out is by not buying drugs. (It will also help the good people of American out, and yourself as well.)

    By the way, Mexico also is being plagued by a Marxist terrorist-revolutionary group that has been blowing up petrochemical pipelines.

    23 September 2007
    Kidnapping (or Worse) Fought Off by Arizona Woman
    [Brenda Walker] @ 3:22 pm [Email author] [Email This Article] [Print This Article]

    Illegal immigration poses more dangers for women than for men, in particular when foreigners from misogynous cultures (that would be most of them) see independent American women as easy marks. Such an attitude may have been behind the midnight attack on a young Gilbert, Arizona, woman as she walked home alone from work.

    However, the Mexican attacker got a bad surprise if he was expecting a compliant victim. Tracy Mann, 21, became suspicious when she saw a truck with the door open and no one around. She opened up the pocketknife she always carries ("because you just never know") and was ready when a man accosted her and tried to steal her purse.

    Mann fought back with the knife. "He was just tugging me and the purse, and I just started slashing at him," she said.

    She said she didn't stop slashing until the man let her go and ran away. Mann followed him up an embankment of rocks to a waiting truck so she could write down the license plate number.

    Mesa police found the truck a short time later in Mesa and arrested Filemon Del Hoyo, 18, Abel Lorenzo Reyes, 18, and Isidro Mendoza, 22, all of Mesa.
    [Woman with knife fends off attacker, Arizona Daily Star 9/22/07]

    The man who tried to snatch Tracy's purse had been recently arrested for burglary and deported, but he returned to this country to resume his criminal ways. What's up with that–is burglary no longer considered a serious crime? The attacker, Filemon Del Hoyo, should have been kept in jail for trial instead of being released to Mexico.

    This story could have had a tragic ending rather than a happy one because of a foreign criminal being freed from jail. Tracy Mann said she "felt like he was after more than my purse," and hopes that attempted kidnapping will be added to Del Hoyo's list of crimes. If she had not fought back against her Mexican attacker, she might have become another statistic among the Americans injured or killed by illegal aliens.

    30 August 2007
    Mexico's Crime Invading San Diego
    [Brenda Walker] @ 12:06 am [Email author] [Email This Article] [Print This Article]
    As noted several times in these parts, Mexican kidnapping diversity is spreading rapidly into American communities along with the rather limited benefits of salsa and enchiladas. Just as predicted, the increased incidence of kidnapping in Tijuana has moved north.

    The pre-trial hearing currently unfolding in San Diego is revealing fascinating details of Mexican crime culture. Abductee and Mexican businessman Eduardo Gonza*** Tostado (shown) testified that he was held captive for eight days after being lured to a Chula Vista house with the hope of a sexual liaison. Bad choice, bub.


    Amusingly, his pregnant wife hung up the phone when he called with the ransom demands, figuring it was tom foolery to cover up his staying out all night with another woman. The guy evidently has a history.

    But the headline in Monday's Orange County Register was more serious "” Victim: Kidnappers unafraid to commit Mexican-style crime in U.S.

    Eduardo Gonza*** Tostado, 32, haltingly recounted his captors' threats and demands for money in the first hours after a woman lured him to a home in a quiet cul-de-sac the night of June 8 with the promise of ***. Instead, he was jumped, beaten and shot with a stun gun by at least four men who blindfolded and bound him.

    Gonza*** was finally rescued by an FBI SWAT team who tracked a suitcase full of money with a homing device to the hideout. Of the six accused perps, there are four Mexican citizens, one Cuban and one U.S. citizen. They could be sentenced to life in prison.

    That's crime diversity in San Diego these days.

    19 August 2007
    Mexico Propaganda and Crime Update
    [Brenda Walker] @ 7:07 pm [Email author] [Email This Article] [Print This Article]
    Here's the Los Angeles Times today, presenting a news story that involves illegal immigration. It starts out well enough, then goes off the tracks...

    Violent crime along the U.S.-Mexico border, which has long plagued the scrubby, often desolate stretch, is increasingly spilling northward into the cities of the American Southwest.

    In Phoenix, deputies are working the unsolved case of 13 border crossers who were kidnapped and executed in the desert. In Dallas, nearly two dozen high school students have died in the last two years from overdoses of a $2-a-hit Mexican fad drug called "cheese heroin."

    The crime surge, most acute in Texas and Arizona, is fueled by a gritty drug war in Mexico that includes hostages being held in stash houses, daylight gun battles claiming innocent lives, and teenage hit men for the Mexican cartels. Shipments of narcotics and vans carrying illegal workers on U.S. highways are being hijacked by rival cartels fighting over the lucrative smuggling routes. Fires are being set in national forests to divert police.
    [Border violence pushes north, Los Angeles Times 8/19/07]

    What? The crime spreading north from Mexico is a result of continued open borders and the cartels working to increase their market share. The spillover from the war among the cartels is a just a part of worsening violence from foreigners in the Southwest. Many of the examples cited in the article are just more of the same Mexican crime tsunami flowing into America because of Bush's refusal to enforce the borders as required by the Constitution.

    As reported in here, Mexicans at home are fighting over which gang of thugs will contol the multi-billion-dollar drug trade in certain regions, particularly the future NAFTA highway following Route 35. ("Drug traffickers kill for I-35." )

    As I've written before, you don't have to believe Mexico is a crime-friendly culture to understand that upwardly mobile professional criminals want to operate where they can maximize profits. The low-rent boonies of Mexico look pretty unappealing compared to the bright lights and big money of the United States: drug smugglers have an American Dream of success too.

    But such harch realities of diversity must be smoothed over by la Times with warm and cuddly reminders of how lucky we are to be invaded by Mexico. Remarkably, the LA Times can't miss an opportunity to celebrate diversity and denigrate sovereignty even while the paper describes worsening crime.

    Nestor Rodriguez, a University of Houston sociologist, said people on both sides of the Rio Grande viewed themselves as one community.

    "People say, ˜The river doesn't divide us; it unites us,' " he said. "When you're at ground zero at the border, you see yourselves as one community "” for good or bad."

    Meanwhile, the growing violence in Mexico is spreading to areas that were once thought immune. Calderon's crackdown doesn't appear to be very effective.

    The violence has spread to the affluent business city of Monterrey, the beach resort of Acapulco and beyond. In remote towns like Juchitan on the Pacific coast, wealthy local families have fled a wave of kidnappings by drug gangs. [...]

    "They are professionals. Their infrastructure is more powerful than the police. The authorities don't have the resources to face up to a phenomenon like this," said a drug expert within the Veracruz state government.

    "This isn't finished, I think it's only just beginning," said the expert, who asked not to be named.
    [Once quiet towns engulfed by Mexico drugs war Reuters 7/18/07]

    Don't think the Mexican way of crime, including drug cartels, is not coming to America: it's here and getting worse.

    27 July 2007
    Mexican Crime Incursion Update
    [Brenda Walker] @ 12:34 pm [Email author] [Email This Article] [Print This Article]
    I've been writing for a while about Mexican crime diversity coming here, particularly kidnapping. Mexican criminals like to snatch people and demand their families pay ransom, a crime that has been "nearly non-existent" in America, but is quite popular in the narco-state next door. (See Mexico's Kidnap Culture Appears in Florida and Mexico Battle Lines There and Here and Applied Kidnapping in Mexico City.)

    Kidnapping is a crime specialty with low start-up costs, and is therefore attractive to young criminal fellows anxious to get going without a large initial investment. A van, a gun and some duct tape can get an aspirational Mexican started as a professional kidnapper. Mexican crooks may think that the bright lights and big money of the USA will provide handsome ransoms. However, they should remember that America takes kidnapping very seriously when it's time for punishment to be meted out.

    Houston is the latest American city to experience the diversity of Mexico-style kidnapping for ransom.

    Houston police announced Wednesday the discovery of a kidnapping and robbery operation in which unsuspecting people were snatched and held hostage until their relatives paid ransoms of a few thousand dollars.

    While the actions of the ring mirror random kidnappings that have plagued Mexico and other Latin American nations for years, police said they have no evidence to suggest the Houston ring is connected to organized-crime groups in other countries. But experts familiar with so called "express kidnappings" taking place just south of the border said the Texas operation appears similar.
    [Kidnapping ring similar to scams south of border, Houston Chronicle 7/26/07]

    In other crime news, Mexican marijuana growers have infested public lands near Chicago to avoid the troublesome crossings over the border.

    Just yards from busy roads, the planting and pruning took place in 11 separate fields dotting the 1,650-acre preserve. If the crop were harvested next month, sneaked onto trucks and sold locally or abroad, the drug runners could have raked in up to $10 million, authorities estimate.
    [Pot plantation discovered in forest preserve Daily Herald 7/25/07]

    There have been reports for several years of Mexican organized crime moving into national parks and other protected natural areas, like Point Reyes, to grow pot and generally trash the place. The biggest hauls have been made in California, but interior states like Alabama and Kentucky have also been hit with invasive marijuana-growing pests.

    One report puts clean-up costs to restore the land at $11,000 per acre.

    21 June 2007
    Mexican Kidnapping Diversity Arrives in San Diego
    [Brenda Walker] @ 8:57 am [Email author] [Email This Article] [Print This Article]
    Open borders are increasingly welcoming the Mexican way of crime to this country. Forget the sentimental baloney about hard-working foreigners breaking in to feed their families: America's full refrigerator of riches is an irresistible attraction to criminals looking to upgrade their lifestyle via bigger and better illegal activity than they could achieve at home. (See Beyond Willie Sutton for an examination of foreign criminals in search of a better life.)

    Kidnapping can be a low-rent crime, since it requires little in the way of infrastructure. A gun, a vehicle and a hiding place mean you can be in business. Voila! People-snatching has grown in popularity in Mexico, which is #2 in kidnapping per capita in the world, right behind Colombia.

    In February, 13-year-old Clay Moore of Parrish, Florida, was grabbed by Mexican Vicente Beltran-Moreno at a school bus stop in a kidnap-for-ransom plot (Mexico's Kidnap Culture Appears in Florida). Fortunately Clay was resourceful enough to escape his captivity, but the crime was an indicator of Mexicans' third-world criminal preferences appearing in America.

    Another devolutionary marker is the current kidnapping case in San Diego. Five Hispanic non-citizens snatched a man for cash in the Mexican style. Kidnapping for ransom was practically unheard of in the United States until now, when treasonous Washington has dissolved national borders and sovereignty for money and influence.

    Five men pleaded not guilty Wednesday to charges of kidnapping and torture in what prosecutors said was a sophisticated kidnap-for-ransom ring.

    The five were involved in the kidnapping of Eduardo Gonza*** Tostado, 32, whose family paid $200,000 in ransom, said San Diego Deputy District Attorney Mark Amador.
    [Five men charged with kidnap for ransom San Jose Mercury News 6/20/07]

    This turn of events was easy to predict because of the earlier reports of Mexicans "moving" to southern California to escape the escalating crime wave in Mexico. Of course, they just brought their criminal culture with them, along with their famous enchiladas.

    1 June 2007
    Mexican Admits Hate Crime Hoax
    [Brenda Walker] @ 1:02 am [Email author] [Email This Article] [Print This Article]
    Open-borders Mexicans were thrilled a couple weeks ago with the report that Rancho Cucamonga day laborer Jose Felix Gutierrez had been kidnapped "by a white man" and forcibly removed to Tijuana with his hands cuffed. Mexicans wanted to blame the "crime" on the Minutemen who have been protesting the illegal laborers at the local Home Depot.


    Come to find out, there was no crime at all. Mr. Gutierrez had a little psychological problem, we are told, resulting in his telling complete lies about what happened to him, making his sudden disappearance a false victimhood tale.

    When San Bernardino County sheriff's investigators talked to Jose Feliz Gutierrez by phone, he said the kidnapping story he told to his sister was a lie.

    "Jose stated he had left on his own accord," said Detective Jesse Venegas in a statement released Wednesday. "The entire event was a fabrication.

    "Jose stated that he was scared to stand at the corner and look for work because of recent events such as the tragic accident that took the life of a fellow day laborer." [...]

    Minuteman national rally spokesman Raymond Herrera said the group had serious doubts about the kidnapping claim from the start.

    He said the group believed the story was a lie.

    "The Minuteman group knew that from the start," he said. "It just didn't add up."

    The news that the kidnapping story was a lie is regrettable, said Jose Calderon [send him mail] , professor of sociology and Chicano studies at Pitzer College.
    [Day-laborer kidnapping report a hoax: Man who claimed he was taken in handcuffs to Mexico admits that he lied, San Bernardino Sun 5/30/07]

    Incidentally, Prof Calderon added to the shriekfest decibels by calling a press conference May 16 to decry the "kidnapping" outrage, so he is certainly telling the truth that he finds the lie "regrettable." Mexicans have wanted a sympathetic martyr at the hands of patriotic Americans, but the Minutemen have not cooperated.

    As it happens, fake hate crimes are not that unusual when members of some self-appointed victim class wants to create sympathy for themselves or their cause. However, in some high profile cases the fraudsters are tried and convicted, like Claremont Professor Kerri Dunn who was sentenced to a year in state prison for concocting a fake hate crime in which she was the "victim."

    As an educational exercise, check out the incidence of hate crime hoaxes "” there are well over a million listings online.

    27 February 2007
    Mexico's Kidnap Culture Appears in Florida
    [Brenda Walker] @ 2:26 pm [Email author] [Email This Article] [Print This Article]
    Clay Moore is one smart "” and lucky "” young fellow. The 13-year-old resident of Parrish, Florida, was kidnapped at gunpoint by an illegal alien on Friday in an attempted kidnap-for-ransom plot. Clay cleverly used a safety pin to escape being duct-taped to a tree in a remote wooded area 20 miles from the abduction, and then found a farmer with a cell phone which he used to call for help.

    On the day he was kidnapped, Clay Moore's parents made the 13-year-old use a safety pin to mend his school uniform because he was to blame for tearing it.

    That safety pin became key to Clay's escape from the kidnapper, who snatched him at gunpoint from a school bus stop last Friday and left him in an East Manatee woods taped up and gagged.
    [Clay Moore's incredible tale of escape from an armed kidnapper, Sarasota Herald Tribune 2/27/07]

    Below: Clay Moore appeared with his family at a press conference.



    This case is a very concerning example of Mexicans bringing their culture of crime, particularly kidnapping, to this country.

    Kidnapping for ransom is nearly non-existent in the whole of the USA. In Tijuana, there were close to 100 reported incidents of it last year.
    [Crime wears on Tijuana, San Diego, USA Today 2/05/07]

    Suspect Vicente Beltran-Moreno, who earlier worked as an agricultural picker nearby, remains at large, and may have already escaped to Mexico. Naturally, the local illegal alien community fears a "backlash."

    Meanwhile, parents have begun accompanying their children to bus stops.

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    • #3
      Mexico has been a failed state for decades, but its further descent has intensified in recent years. Any country that exports its people by the millions...while simultaneously displaying untold arrogance and interference in America's internal affairs...is a failed state.

      It is just our misfortune that Mexico is our southern neighbor. Why couldn't we have another country just like Canada to our south?

      The American people are sick and tired of having to deal with Mexico's inability and unwillingness to provide for itself. Mexico sure got lucky in having America as its northern neighbor...a country that has appeared willing for decades to treat Mexico as a welfare case.

      If it wasn't for America's generosity, often abused, resented and taken for granted, Mexico would be in even worse shape.

      Mexican illegals ought to bear this in mind the next time they have the audacity and unbridled arrogance to wave the Mexican rag in the streets of America; their time would be better spent trying to ensure that their children actually graduate from high school and don't have illegitimate kids in their *****.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SunDevilUSA:
        Mexico has been a failed state for decades, but its further descent has intensified in recent years. Any country that exports its people by the millions...while simultaneously displaying untold arrogance and interference in America's internal affairs...is a failed state.

        It is just our misfortune that Mexico is our southern neighbor. Why couldn't we have another country just like Canada to our south?

        The American people are sick and tired of having to deal with Mexico's inability and unwillingness to provide for itself. Mexico sure got lucky in having America as its northern neighbor...a country that has appeared willing for decades to treat Mexico as a welfare case.

        If it wasn't for America's generosity, often abused, resented and taken for granted, Mexico would be in even worse shape.

        Mexican illegals ought to bear this in mind the next time they have the audacity and unbridled arrogance to wave the Mexican rag in the streets of America; their time would be better spent trying to ensure that their children actually graduate from high school and don't have illegitimate kids in their *****.
        I couldn't agree more. The marches and the waving of the Mexican rag was a LaRaza tactic to intimidate us. I'm just happy it back-fired. They have been slowly building up their ranks since the 1986 amnesty and our government has been financially supporting this racist hate group (and others) with our tax dollars. They recently passed a budget allocating 10 Million of our tax dollars to NCLR. The ACLU, and the catholic church are further duplicitous in the aiding and abetting of illegal aliens. The lawsuits being filed against Americans on behalf of the OBL and the illegal population is treasonous.

        The arrogance of the Mexican government and claims of "where there's a Mexican there is Mexico" is beyond sheer arrogance. Every time this clown sticks his nose in America's business or utters cr-ap like this, our government should fine Mexico $1 million dollars and deduct it from their foreign aid package. On second thought, we should cut off ALL FOREIGN AID since all of Mexico's impoverished now reside in and are received social services and welfare courtesy of our tax dollars.
        If not several congressmen and senators sounding the alarm to constituent (via email) every time some form of amnesty was slipped into a viable bill by our traitors in government, our days as a sovereign nation, would be a distant memory.
        Wolves Travel In Packs
        ____________________

        Comment


        • #5
          We need to stop the flow of some $20B annually of remittances back to Mexico....get rid of all illegal aliens....they are stealing $20B a year, and less than $1.79 of this sum is used to start businesses (besides tiny little kiosks that sell cerveza, cigarettes and potatoe chips) or expand operating ones, to build schools or improve roads...virtually every dime is spent on cerveza, cigarettes, other booze, likely some clothes for the few kids that aren't scamming a free education in the USand building summer slums, er, cottages, in which people can drink more beer, smoke more cigarettes and other booze.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by SunDevilUSA:
            Mexico has been a failed state for decades, but its further descent has intensified in recent years. Any country that exports its people by the millions...while simultaneously displaying untold arrogance and interference in America's internal affairs...is a failed state.

            It is just our misfortune that Mexico is our southern neighbor. Why couldn't we have another country just like Canada to our south?
            The American people are sick and tired of having to deal with Mexico's inability and unwillingness to provide for itself. Mexico sure got lucky in having America as its northern neighbor...a country that has appeared willing for decades to treat Mexico as a welfare case.

            If it wasn't for America's generosity, often abused, resented and taken for granted, Mexico would be in even worse shape.

            Mexican illegals ought to bear this in mind the next time they have the audacity and unbridled arrogance to wave the Mexican rag in the streets of America; their time would be better spent trying to ensure that their children actually graduate from high school and don't have illegitimate kids in their *****.
            Well, if you don't like this country's location, why the F--- don't you go back to your lapdog-of-the-USA country ASAP? We don't need you whining here, stupid.

            Comment


            • #7
              WHKrapp: Well, aren't you just the miserable little apologist for Mexico and its illiterate hordes. Senor Calderon has your leash and collar waiting for you at his palace in Mexico City.

              I live in America, and this is the country to which my loyalty belongs. Mexico is a foreign country that I will criticize at will...and I will do so regardless of what you, senor Calderon's little lap-Chihuahua, say.

              Comment


              • #8
                what's up punks

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