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  • Dual Citizenship

    Our son is born in USA Mother 100% Pinay and Philippine citizen. Father born USA and citizen of USA. Is it possible to have Dual Citizenship for our son ? How to accomplish if possible ?
    Thank you in advance for your help *(:>*

  • #2
    Our son is born in USA Mother 100% Pinay and Philippine citizen. Father born USA and citizen of USA. Is it possible to have Dual Citizenship for our son ? How to accomplish if possible ?
    Thank you in advance for your help *(:>*

    Comment


    • #3
      The United States does not encourage dual citizenship but doesn't oppose it either but the US citizenship has to come first. By this I mean such things as you would travel on a US passport and not on the citizenship of another country etc. As long as the philipines don't have a problem with it, then your son can have dual citizenship. I currently have dual citizenship of the UK and the Republic of Ireland but I won't be renouncing these citizenships when I become a US citizen simply for the reason that I want to give my kids the opportunity to work or study in the UK or Ireland if they want it.

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      • #4
        Thanks for your reply Paddy....
        My Grandfathers Family
        hailed from County Cork *(:>*

        Dual Citizenship FAQ: I googled some good info.
        But nothing speaking towards the Philippines Law side of the equation.

        Was just hoping to find some realtime/life experiences with regards to the Philippines.

        Just at the leading edge of this search now.
        Idealy I can find the answers I am seeking
        in good time.
        Thanks again for your imput *(:>*

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        • #5
          yes. in fact it is required.

          if someone naturalizes, and that citizenship is taken away -- that way they can still deport you to wherever you are still a "citizen".

          -= nav =-

          Comment


          • #6
            FYI:

            The US Gov't does NOT recognize Dual-Citizenship period. (Regardless of how other countries deal with it)

            It can become a conflict of interest among different governments and thus, We (USA) don't recognize it legally.

            Comment


            • #7
              Last I checked the State Department was a branch of the U.S. Government.

              http://travel.state.gov/dualnationality.html

              The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Each country has its own citizenship laws based on its own policy.Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. For example, a child born in a foreign country to U.S. citizen parents may be both a U.S. citizen and a citizen of the country of birth.
              A U.S. citizen may acquire foreign citizenship by marriage, or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth.U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship.

              Intent can be shown by the person's statements or conduct.The U.S. Government recognizes that dual nationality exists but does not encourage it as a matter of policy because of the problems it may cause. Claims of other countries on dual national U.S. citizens may conflict with U.S. law, and dual nationality may limit U.S. Government efforts to assist citizens abroad. The country where a dual national is located generally has a stronger claim to that person's allegiance.

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              • #8
                Apparently NP missed this post too. I guess there are at least two of us that have not bought in to the urban myth that the U.S. Government does not recognize dual citizenship. How about that!

                Comment


                • #9
                  J.Henry, you are an Idiot.

                  Read carefully.....If you want to claim dual, triple, or quadruple citizenship that is fine. Nobody is going to take that away from you. It's a matter of US policy that our Gov't won't recognize your other citizenship.

                  Foreign citizenship makes no difference under US law if one is also a US citizen.

                  US citizenship law is primarily concerned with whether or not a given person holds US citizenship. If a person is a US citizen and is currently within the jurisdiction of the US, any other citizenship(s) he or she may hold are really NOT RELEVANT in US law. (thus, USA does NOT recognize your other claim of citizenship)

                  A "dual citizen" has no special status in the US by virtue of holding citizenship in some other country too. In particular, if you are a dual citizen and get into some kind of legal trouble while in the US, you should NOT expect the US to acknowledge any efforts by consular officials of your other country of citizenship to intervene in your behalf.

                  Does this make sense to you JHENRY ??

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    NP,

                    What part of "The U.S. Government recognizes that dual nationality exists but does not encourage it as a matter of policy because of the problems it may cause." do you not understand???

                    Why do you keep insisting that the U.S. Government does not recognize dual citizenship? Look at the quote above directly from the State Department!!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey JHENRY, what part of the following State Dep't literature don't you understand ?

                      From the Dept. of State official scripts:

                      "While recognizing the existence of dual nationality and permitting Americans to have other nationalities, the U.S. Government does not endorse dual nationality as a matter of policy because of the problems which it may cause. Claims of other countries upon dual-national U.S. Citizens often place them in situations where their obligations to one country are in conflict with the laws of the other.


                      In addition, their dual nationality may hamper efforts to provide diplomatic and consular protection to them while they are abroad. It generally is considered that while a dual national is in the other country of which the person is a citizen, that country has a predominant claim on the person. In cases where a dual national encounters difficulty in a foreign country of which the person is a citizen, the ability of the U.S. Government to provide assistance may be quite limited since many foreign countries may not recognize the dual national's claim to U.S. Citizenship.

                      _________

                      So JHENRY, are we still going to act stupid or are you going to acknowledge the OBVIOUS. Please tell me your not that dumb.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        NP,

                        You wrote: "The US Gov't does NOT recognize Dual-Citizenship period."

                        The State Department web site says "The U.S. Government recognizes that dual nationality exists..."

                        What more can I say?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yes, I agree that our Gov't accepts the fact that certain individuals have an ability to obtain citizenships from other countries (i.e. by virtue of being a 'Natural born' citizen) and recognize it may exist......

                          However, as a matter of US POLICY, we (US Gov't) don't give a damn of how one sees themself as being. In other words, your USC status is the ONLY thing that matters. (thus, US LAW will not take into account how many citizenships one may hold when it applies to adminstering us law & regs)

                          Can't you see why the US gov't must take this approach due to conflict of interest that may arise? at any rate, we'll have to agree to disagree on this one JH

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            NP,

                            Yes I agree with what you are saying about US Policy. I was only disagreeing with the statement that the U.S. Government does not recognize dual citizenship.

                            Cheers.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Cheers back at you ! You seem to be stand up guy and commend your way of rationalizing.

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