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Am I a Citizen? how do I proove it.

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  • Am I a Citizen? how do I proove it.

    I have lived in this country for the last 38 years. I have been married to an American and have 2 sons. I was divorced 7 years ago. My current job requires proof of citizenship but I don't know what I need to prove it.
    Thank you for any help.

  • #2
    hi there.. You said you have living here for the last 38 years, i don't see any reason why you can't prove that u are a citizen.... Any job especially in the USA requires that the person be a US citizen or national of the United States, a permanent resident, or an alien authorize to work... If you actually applied for a job and had checked a form that said that u are a us citizen, then you must prove it to them especially if you are applying for government jobs, or maybe any kind of job.... PROOF OF CITIZENSHIP CAN BE United States Birth Certificate as well as US PASSPORT.... In additon, You can also prove it to them if you have a CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION FROM THE IMMIGRATION. I hope this helps!!! Thanks!

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    • #3
      Thank you for your response. I came here when I was 7 on a green card. I think I had dual citizenship in this country and Denmark where I was born. My Dad was American, in the military, and my mom is Danish. When I was 18 I was supposed to claim either Country but I never did. What do you think I need to do now? If I need a CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION FROM THE IMMIGRATION how do I apply for it?
      Thanks again.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Uncle Jack:
        I have lived in this country for the last 38 years. I have been married to an American and have 2 sons. I was divorced 7 years ago. My current job requires proof of citizenship but I don't know what I need to prove it.
        Thank you for any help.
        US Passport, US birth certificate, a INS/USCIS certificate of naturalization, or state dept form showing birth from abroad.
        "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

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        • #5
          According to you, you came here with a green when you were 7 years old.... and your father is an american citizen so that automatically means that you are qualified to be an american citizen... I don't know if you are parents are still alive or not, but I suggest you should ask them especially your father if they applied for your citizenship or not.... please this is just an opinion.... Since you have no way of proving that you are a citizen, you might want to hire a qualified lawyer to help.... In order to get CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION, you must apply for it.... I'll give you a website that can help you more: go to http://www.uscis.gov and go the CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT!
          ************************************************************************************************

          Citizenship of Children

          The 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution guarantees citizenship at birth to almost all individuals born in the United States or in U.S. jurisdictions, according to the principle of jus soli. Certain individuals born in the United States, such as children of foreign heads of state or children of foreign diplomats, do not obtain U.S. citizenship under jus soli.


          Certain individuals born outside of the United States are born citizens because of their parents, according to the principle of jus sanguinis (which holds that the country of citizenship of a child is the same as that of his / her parents). The U.S. Congress is responsible for enacting laws that determine how citizenship is conveyed by a U.S. citizen parent or parents according to the principle of jus sanguinis. These laws are contained in the Immigration and Nationality Act.

          In addition, Each year, many people adopt children from outside the U.S. The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 (CCA) grants those children the ability to automatically become U.S. citizens when they immigrate to the United States.

          Information for Parents of Foreign-Born Biological Children Residing in the U.S.

          Information for Parents of Foreign-Born Biological Children Residing in the U.S., January 2004

          The Child Citizenship Act (CCA) declares that children who are younger than 18 years of age and have at least one parent who is a U.S. citizen whether by birth or naturalization will acquire automatic citizenship. Under the CCA, qualifying children who immigrate to the United States with a U.S. citizen parent automatically acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry; children who live abroad acquire citizenship on approval of an application and the taking of the oath of allegiance.



          Frequently Asked Questions

          1. Does my child qualify for automatic citizenship under the CCA?
          Under the CCA, your child will automatically acquire U.S. citizenship on the date that all of the following requirements are satisfied:

          At least one parent is a U.S. citizen,
          The child is under 18 years of age, and
          The child is admitted to the United States as an immigrant.

          2. Do I have to apply to USCIS for my child's citizenship?

          No. If your child satisfies the requirements listed above, he or she automatically acquires U.S. citizenship by operation of law on the day he or she is admitted to the United States as an immigrant. Your child's citizenship status is no longer dependent on USCIS approving a naturalization application.



          3. What documentation can I get of my child's citizenship?

          If your child permanently resides in the U.S, you can obtain evidence of your child's citizenship by applying for a Certificate of Citizenship. You will need to file Form N-600 (Application for Certificate of Citizenship) and submit it to the local USCIS District Office or Sub-Office that holds jurisdiction over your permanent residence. You can also apply for a U.S. Passport from the Department of State.



          4. Will USCIS automatically provide me with documentation of my child's citizenship?

          At the present time, USCIS is not able to automatically provide biological parents with documentation of their child's citizenship. USCIS will continue to implement programs that streamline processes to more rapidly issue Certificates of Citizenship to qualifying children.


          5. Is automatic citizenship provided for those who are 18 years of age or older?

          No. Individuals who are 18 years of age or older on February 27, 2001, do not qualify for citizenship under the CCA, even if they meet all other criteria. If they wish to become U.S. citizens, they must apply for naturalization and meet eligibility requirements that currently exist for adult lawful permanent residents.

          6. What forms do I file and what are the fees?

          If your child permanently resides in the U.S., you can apply for evidence of citizenship by filing form N-600 (Application for Certificate of Citizenship). If you are filing on behalf of an adopted minor child, the fee is $145 (all other applicants must pay $185).

          7. Where should I file the forms?

          If your child permanently resides in the U.S., you can file form N-600 (Application for Certificate of Citizenship) at any USCIS District Office or Sub-Office that that holds jurisdiction over your permanent residence.

          8. What resources are available to answer questions about the Child Citizenship Act?

          For more information about the CCA application procedures and forms, you may go to the USCIS Web site at http://uscis.gov or contact our National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283. USCIS has also made available field guidance and public materials to all information officers and other front line staff to aid them in answering questions.

          Please also read the following for more information:
          Child Citizenship Program Fact Sheet, 1/22/04
          Information for Adoptive Parents of Foreign-Born Orphans Residing in the U.S., January 2004
          Information for Parents of Foreign-Born Children Residing Abroad, January 2004





          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------I hope this helps!!!

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          • #6
            Hi i was adopted when i was 5 which was about 1987. So i was wondering am i a united states citizen or do i still have aply for citizenship???

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            • #7
              @I was adopted: I already answered this to you at your formal thread...read it.
              Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

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              • #8
                You have to be a permanent resident before you become a citizen, they are 2 different things

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                • #9
                  I can't believe your story!!! I was born in Germany to a Danish mom-adopted by an US military man a year later-a citizen and came here when I was 16. I also didn't know about the law re: keeping my Danish citizenship so I lost it when I turned 22 and now have been "stateless" for approx 20 years and am finally getting around to straightening out this mess. What did you find out??? Homeland Security told me I need to see a Immigration Attorney and I have an appt this Friday but I am hoping to find a "cheaper" way out. THe Child Act (?name) of 2000 doesn't apply to us because of our age so don't waste your time there.
                  I would love to know what you found out!!

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                  • #10
                    Lets get real hear.

                    If you are indeed a citizen of the united states,you would not be in this forum to ask how to proof it and tell us your life story,how long u have been living here.

                    The easiest way to always proof u are a citizen is to present your U.S. Passport in case you do not have your neutralization papers etc.

                    But U can live in the US for 100 years, that does not make u a citizen,unless u applied for.

                    So I just make the judgement.You are NOT citizen to begin with!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by HBKHBK:
                      Lets get real hear.

                      If you are indeed a citizen of the united states,you would not be in this forum to ask how to proof it and tell us your life story,how long u have been living here.

                      The easiest way to always proof u are a citizen is to present your U.S. Passport in case you do not have your neutralization papers etc.

                      But U can live in the US for 100 years, that does not make u a citizen,unless u applied for.

                      So I just make the judgement.You are NOT citizen to begin with!
                      What are you talking about! This happens a lot.

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                      • #12
                        You obviously don't know WHAT you are talking about. If you are stateless you can't get a passport because you are not a citizen of any country!!!! "Neutralization papers" if you are going to post something at least know what you are talking about!!! AND you don't have to APPLY for it in many cases. I suggest you go to http://uscis.gov and read up on the subject!!!]Originally posted by HBKHBK:
                        Lets get real hear.

                        If you are indeed a citizen of the united states,you would not be in this forum to ask how to proof it and tell us your life story,how long u have been living here.

                        The easiest way to always proof u are a citizen is to present your U.S. Passport in case you do not have your neutralization papers etc.

                        But U can live in the US for 100 years, that does not make u a citizen,unless u applied for.

                        So I just make the judgement.You are NOT citizen to begin with![/QUOTE]

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                        • #13
                          To prove that you are a true American you must do the folowing;

                          1) Punch every Moslem you see in the face
                          2) Spit on the Koran every day
                          3) Kill a Moslem at least once a week
                          4) Never vote for a liberal
                          5) Obey the laws and rules
                          6) Be courteous and kind (except to Moslems, Jews, Fundamentalist Christians, Liberals,Mormons, Democrats, Republicans, Ralph Nader supporters, blacks, racist whites and any other idiots not included in this list)
                          7) Support Gun Control for above mentioned group and oppose it for law obeying white non-fundamentalist Christian males
                          8) Oppose feminists
                          9) Oppose racism
                          10) Support all American ideals and shun all foreign ones

                          Only then will I accept you as a true American

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                          • #14
                            Somebody git him some of them pills or somethin'. He's a living contradiction!

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                            • #15
                              oh my goddddd sonofmichael ..ur really a big **** and idiot.. they should spit in ur mouth u stupid a s s ...shame on u ..realy shame on u

                              Comment



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