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NEW POLL WHICH SUGGEST THE AMERICAN PEOPLE SUPPORTS A GUEST WORKER PROGRAM

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  • NEW POLL WHICH SUGGEST THE AMERICAN PEOPLE SUPPORTS A GUEST WORKER PROGRAM

    Seem like all those demonstration nation wide have soften up the heart of the american public
    ------------------------------------

    04/06/06 FOX Poll: Views on Illegal Immigration, Bush Job Rating Down

    Friday, April 07, 2006
    By Dana Blanton

    NEW YORK "” Although a clear majority of Americans believe illegal immigration is a very serious problem for the country, many think it is somebody else's problem "” as fewer than one in four say it is a very serious problem for their community, according to the latest FOX News Poll. Seven in 10 people say they favor allowing illegals that have jobs to apply for temporary-worker status, but eight in 10 think it is unfair to grant rights to illegal immigrants while so many others wait to come to the United States legally.

    Immigration

    Overall, more Americans (42 percent) think immigrants generally help make the country a better place to live than think they hurt the country (30 percent). One in five have a mixed view.

    On the issue of jobs, about a third of Americans (34 percent) think illegal immigrants are taking jobs away from citizens, but more "” nearly half (47 percent) "” think illegals mainly do jobs Americans don't want to do.

    Serious Problem for the Country

    Almost all Americans (90 percent) say illegal immigration is a "very" serious (60 percent) or "somewhat" serious (30 percent) problem for the country today "” essentially unchanged from a year ago this time.

    Republicans (65 percent) are somewhat more likely than Democrats (58 percent) to say illegal immigration is a "very" serious problem, and Americans over age 65 are significantly more likely than those under age 30 to think so (71 percent and 46 percent respectively).

    When the question is geared toward the local level, the number saying it is a problem drops by about half, as less than a quarter (23 percent) saying illegal immigration is a "very" serious problem in their community and another 24 percent "somewhat" serious.

    Opinion Dynamics Corporation conducted the national telephone poll of 900 registered voters for FOX News on April 4-5.

    "Americans have a lot of contradictory views on immigration, both legal and illegal," comments Opinion Dynamics Chairman John Gorman. "They find immigrants make a contribution and that illegals do jobs that might otherwise not get done. However, when they have to calculate the bottom line, they aren't sure whether it is a net positive or negative."

    Dealing with Illegal Immigrants

    How do Americans want to deal with illegal immigrants? Large majorities favor increasing the number of border patrol agents (80 percent) and imposing fines and criminal charges against employers who hire illegals (73 percent).

    By eight-to-one, Americans think it is unfair to grant rights to illegal immigrants while thousands of people wait each year to come to the United States legally. Fully 86 percent of Republicans think it is unfair, as do 77 percent of Democrats.

    However, once illegal immigrants are across the border, Americans turn around a little. More than two-thirds (69 percent) favor allowing illegals who have jobs already to apply for legal, temporary-worker status, up from 62 percent last year (April 2005).

    No real partisan or gender differences here, as sizable majorities of all groups are in favor of the temporary worker concept: Democrats (71 percent), Republicans (69 percent), independents (68 percent), women (71 percent) and men (68 percent).

    Slimmer majorities favor deporting as many illegals as possible (57 percent) and using the U.S. military to stop entry at the borders (55 percent). Support for using the military has dropped from 67 percent a year ago, and a high of 79 percent in June 2002, when memories of the 9/11 terrorist attacks were more top of mind.
    Half favor building a wall or fence along the U.S.-Mexico border to stop illegal immigration, while just over a third (36 percent) favor one along the U.S.-Canada border.

    By three-to-one, Americans think illegal immigrants have a greater allegiance to their native countries (57 percent) than to the United States (18 percent), and a slim majority thinks most illegal immigrants just want to make money in the United States and go home (51 percent) rather than become citizens (33 percent) "” possible explanations for why Americans seem less concerned about the deterioration of the country's culture than by other potential negatives.

    Moreover, half of the public says it is common for people in their community to hire illegal immigrants to perform childcare or household jobs. There are clear regional differences, with 60 percent of those in the West saying it is common practice compared to 53 percent in the South and 42 percent in the Midwest.

    What are the Concerns?

    The top worry is that illegal immigrants will strain the government. Almost all Americans (87 percent) say they are concerned illegals will overburden government services, including 61 percent that are "very" concerned and another 26 percent that are "somewhat" concerned.

    Less than a third of Americans (29 percent) say they are "very" concerned that illegal immigration will change the culture of the country. More people are concerned it will increase terrorism (34 percent very concerned), take away wanted jobs (37 percent) and increase crime (39 percent very concerned).

    Most Americans (78 percent) would like to see a law making English the country's official language, including large majorities of Republicans (89 percent), independents (79 percent) and Democrats (68 percent). Similar numbers (77 percent) think speaking English should be a requirement of those applying to become U.S. citizens.

    Even so, nearly four times as many Americans say they think it is more important for illegals to pay their fair share of taxes (45 percent) than to learn English (12 percent), with another 40 percent saying "both."
    Will Immigration Matter in the 2006 Election?

    Despite the high portion of Americans thinking illegal immigration is a serious problem in the United States, immigration comes in well behind other issues when voters are asked to think about what will be most important in deciding their vote for Congress this fall.

    When read a list of seven issues, the economy (20 percent) and Iraq (19 percent) are the two issues that voters today say will matter most to them in the midterm election. Health care (17 percent) comes in third, edging out immigration (13 percent). Fewer than one in 10 say Social Security (9 percent), terrorism (9 percent) or ethics in Washington (6 percent) will be the most important issue to their vote.

    By a 10-percentage point margin, voters say they think Democrats (34 percent) would do a better job than Republicans (24 percent) handling immigration issues, with one in five saying "neither."

  • #2
    Seem like all those demonstration nation wide have soften up the heart of the american public
    ------------------------------------

    04/06/06 FOX Poll: Views on Illegal Immigration, Bush Job Rating Down

    Friday, April 07, 2006
    By Dana Blanton

    NEW YORK "” Although a clear majority of Americans believe illegal immigration is a very serious problem for the country, many think it is somebody else's problem "” as fewer than one in four say it is a very serious problem for their community, according to the latest FOX News Poll. Seven in 10 people say they favor allowing illegals that have jobs to apply for temporary-worker status, but eight in 10 think it is unfair to grant rights to illegal immigrants while so many others wait to come to the United States legally.

    Immigration

    Overall, more Americans (42 percent) think immigrants generally help make the country a better place to live than think they hurt the country (30 percent). One in five have a mixed view.

    On the issue of jobs, about a third of Americans (34 percent) think illegal immigrants are taking jobs away from citizens, but more "” nearly half (47 percent) "” think illegals mainly do jobs Americans don't want to do.

    Serious Problem for the Country

    Almost all Americans (90 percent) say illegal immigration is a "very" serious (60 percent) or "somewhat" serious (30 percent) problem for the country today "” essentially unchanged from a year ago this time.

    Republicans (65 percent) are somewhat more likely than Democrats (58 percent) to say illegal immigration is a "very" serious problem, and Americans over age 65 are significantly more likely than those under age 30 to think so (71 percent and 46 percent respectively).

    When the question is geared toward the local level, the number saying it is a problem drops by about half, as less than a quarter (23 percent) saying illegal immigration is a "very" serious problem in their community and another 24 percent "somewhat" serious.

    Opinion Dynamics Corporation conducted the national telephone poll of 900 registered voters for FOX News on April 4-5.

    "Americans have a lot of contradictory views on immigration, both legal and illegal," comments Opinion Dynamics Chairman John Gorman. "They find immigrants make a contribution and that illegals do jobs that might otherwise not get done. However, when they have to calculate the bottom line, they aren't sure whether it is a net positive or negative."

    Dealing with Illegal Immigrants

    How do Americans want to deal with illegal immigrants? Large majorities favor increasing the number of border patrol agents (80 percent) and imposing fines and criminal charges against employers who hire illegals (73 percent).

    By eight-to-one, Americans think it is unfair to grant rights to illegal immigrants while thousands of people wait each year to come to the United States legally. Fully 86 percent of Republicans think it is unfair, as do 77 percent of Democrats.

    However, once illegal immigrants are across the border, Americans turn around a little. More than two-thirds (69 percent) favor allowing illegals who have jobs already to apply for legal, temporary-worker status, up from 62 percent last year (April 2005).

    No real partisan or gender differences here, as sizable majorities of all groups are in favor of the temporary worker concept: Democrats (71 percent), Republicans (69 percent), independents (68 percent), women (71 percent) and men (68 percent).

    Slimmer majorities favor deporting as many illegals as possible (57 percent) and using the U.S. military to stop entry at the borders (55 percent). Support for using the military has dropped from 67 percent a year ago, and a high of 79 percent in June 2002, when memories of the 9/11 terrorist attacks were more top of mind.
    Half favor building a wall or fence along the U.S.-Mexico border to stop illegal immigration, while just over a third (36 percent) favor one along the U.S.-Canada border.

    By three-to-one, Americans think illegal immigrants have a greater allegiance to their native countries (57 percent) than to the United States (18 percent), and a slim majority thinks most illegal immigrants just want to make money in the United States and go home (51 percent) rather than become citizens (33 percent) "” possible explanations for why Americans seem less concerned about the deterioration of the country's culture than by other potential negatives.

    Moreover, half of the public says it is common for people in their community to hire illegal immigrants to perform childcare or household jobs. There are clear regional differences, with 60 percent of those in the West saying it is common practice compared to 53 percent in the South and 42 percent in the Midwest.

    What are the Concerns?

    The top worry is that illegal immigrants will strain the government. Almost all Americans (87 percent) say they are concerned illegals will overburden government services, including 61 percent that are "very" concerned and another 26 percent that are "somewhat" concerned.

    Less than a third of Americans (29 percent) say they are "very" concerned that illegal immigration will change the culture of the country. More people are concerned it will increase terrorism (34 percent very concerned), take away wanted jobs (37 percent) and increase crime (39 percent very concerned).

    Most Americans (78 percent) would like to see a law making English the country's official language, including large majorities of Republicans (89 percent), independents (79 percent) and Democrats (68 percent). Similar numbers (77 percent) think speaking English should be a requirement of those applying to become U.S. citizens.

    Even so, nearly four times as many Americans say they think it is more important for illegals to pay their fair share of taxes (45 percent) than to learn English (12 percent), with another 40 percent saying "both."
    Will Immigration Matter in the 2006 Election?

    Despite the high portion of Americans thinking illegal immigration is a serious problem in the United States, immigration comes in well behind other issues when voters are asked to think about what will be most important in deciding their vote for Congress this fall.

    When read a list of seven issues, the economy (20 percent) and Iraq (19 percent) are the two issues that voters today say will matter most to them in the midterm election. Health care (17 percent) comes in third, edging out immigration (13 percent). Fewer than one in 10 say Social Security (9 percent), terrorism (9 percent) or ethics in Washington (6 percent) will be the most important issue to their vote.

    By a 10-percentage point margin, voters say they think Democrats (34 percent) would do a better job than Republicans (24 percent) handling immigration issues, with one in five saying "neither."

    Comment


    • #3
      However, once illegal immigrants are across the border, Americans turn around a little. More than two-thirds (69 percent) favor allowing illegals who have jobs already to apply for legal, temporary-worker status, up from 62 percent last year (April 2005).
      ----------------

      the american supports some kind of legal status for the ones that are already here and have strong family ties here.

      Comment


      • #4
        Overall, more Americans (42 percent) think immigrants generally help make the country a better place to live than think they hurt the country (30 percent). One in five have a mixed view.
        ---------

        This kills aliba's arguments which suggest that the majority of the american public thinks thaT undocumented workS hurts the country more then it helps it....NOW I HOPE I WOULD NEVER HAVE TO HEAR SUCH A LIE.

        POLLS AFTER POLLS REFECT SUCH A CLAIM ONLY MADE BY BIGOTS LIKE ALIBA AND OTHER NATIVISM GROUPS.

        Comment


        • #5
          Opinion Dynamics Corporation conducted the national telephone poll of 900 registered voters for FOX News on April 4-5.


          It appears that this entire article (and Jean's subsequent posts in this thread) was based on 900 phone calls??????????? And, 900 phone calls to WHO? Do they have cell phone numbers or are they calling land lines?????????

          Comment


          • #6
            KIND OF FUNNY, BUT WHEN A POLL COMES OU THAT POLLED 50 MINUTE-MEN AND SUGGEST THAT ALL 11 MILLION UNDOCUMENTED WORKER SHOULD BE DEPORTED, YOU SEEM O NO HAVE A PROBLEM WITH IT.

            LOSER!!! THERE ARE 3 NEW POLLS THAT SHOWS THE SAME NUMBERS...THE IMMIGRATION RALLIES HAVE DEEFINATLY GOT TO THE AMERICAN PUBLIC'S HEAD.

            I THINK THE AMERICAN PUBLIC WAS LIKE " WOW, I DIDNT KNOW THERE WERE SO MANY OF THEM AND THERE'S NO WAY WE ARE GOING TO DEPORT 11 MILLION PEOPLE AND BREAK UP FAMILIES"

            Comment


            • #7
              I can't find where I was supportive of a minute man poll.

              3 polls. Is that 2700 people?

              Comment


              • #8
                the 3 polls were conducted by abc, foxnews, timesnews/latimes...there was a 4th one that was conducted about 3 weeks ago that suggested same number...you can not ignore 3 polls..if you one to disagree with just one, but not 4 by different groups and agencies....

                the only polls that will show numbers that contradicts those 3 polls are your people polls conducted by tancredo and the racist minute men ..polls conducted by fair,and other racist groups.

                spring- you are a true bigot for life.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm sorry that I ever replied to any of your posts. You have showed your true character in your threads, I should never have taken you seriously.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You mean those same polls which show that Americans want stronger control of their borders and over immigration--and that they're only supporting legalization as a practical alternative, NOT because they believe in illegal immigration or amnesty? And most likely wouldn't support JUST a legalization program.

                    From the LA TIMES:
                    Most Back Tighter Border and a Guest-Worker Plan
                    By Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
                    April 13, 2006


                    WASHINGTON "” Most Americans say the United States should confront the challenge of illegal immigration by both toughening border enforcement and creating a new guest-worker program rather than stiffening enforcement alone, a Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg poll has found.

                    By a solid 2-1 margin, those surveyed said they would prefer such a comprehensive approach, which a bipartisan group of senators has proposed, to an enforcement-only strategy, which the House of Representatives approved in December. Support for a comprehensive approach was about the same among Democrats, independents and Republicans, the poll found.

                    ADVERTISEMENT
                    "Do you remember 100 years ago when we were saying, 'Give us your tired, give us your poor?' " said David Wells, a Republican who works as a golf course groundskeeper in Plant City, Fla. "How come that doesn't still stand? I don't think it is right to send all the people back who have been here 15 or 20 years, who have families here, who have been good, who haven't been in jail and have been productive."

                    Still, Americans showed markedly less enthusiasm for allowing illegal workers to continue to flow into the U.S. than they did for proposals to permit the estimated 11 million to 12 million illegal immigrants already here to remain legally. And even some of those who rejected efforts to remove the illegal immigrants already in the U.S. made clear in interviews that their opposition was based more on practical than philosophical objections.

                    "I don't think you should be in the country illegally, and I think the people who are here are taking away opportunities from Americans," said Bill Erner, a Democratic factory worker from Dubuque, Iowa. "But the ones that are already here, it would be almost impossible to find them all and send them back to Mexico or wherever they came from."

                    The nationwide Times/Bloomberg poll contacted 1,357 adults, including 1,234 registered voters, from Saturday through Tuesday. The survey, supervised by Times Polling Director Susan Pinkus, has a margin of sampling error for both groups of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

                    The poll contained ominous findings for the Republican House and Senate majorities as the midterm elections approached.

                    Although President Bush's job approval rating was essentially unchanged from his 38% showing last month, the new poll found Democrats opening double-digit leads on the key measures of voters' early preferences for the November balloting.

                    Democrats lead Republicans 49% to 35% among registered voters who were asked which party they intended to support in their congressional districts this fall. When registered voters were asked which party they hoped would control the House and Senate after the midterm election, 51% picked the Democrats and 38% the GOP.

                    On both questions, independent voters preferred Democrats by ratios of about 3 to 1 or more.

                    The Republicans "don't have it anymore," said Alfred Smith, an independent in Bucks County, Pa., who runs a printing company. "They don't trust each other. They don't look like they are all together anymore."

                    Forecasting the effects of these broad national attitudes on the results in individual congressional contests is an imperfect science. Republicans could be helped this fall because relatively few House districts are closely balanced between the parties, and many of the key Senate races are in states that already lean toward the GOP.

                    Even so, the Democratic advantage found in the poll is nearly three times the advantage Republicans had in 1994 when they made landslide gains in congressional elections.

                    In these early soundings for 2006, Republicans face the potential reemergence of a gender gap that Bush narrowed in his 2004 reelection. Although men split evenly when asked which party they intended to support in November, women preferred Democrats 57% to 31%, the survey found.

                    Democrats hold a commanding advantage not only among single women, a traditional Democratic constituency, but among married women, a swing group that broke toward Bush and the GOP in 2004.

                    The impasse in Washington over restructuring immigration laws has led many to predict the issue could become a flashpoint in this year's election. But the public does not yet seem impassioned about the controversy: Although 84% of poll respondents agreed that illegal immigration was a problem, 31% identified it as one of the country's major problems.

                    The idea that drew the most support in the survey was allowing illegal immigrants who had been living and working in the U.S. to obtain visas to work here legally, and to move toward citizenship if they met a list of requirements.

                    Two-thirds of those polled said they supported such a proposal.

                    Still, about one-fifth of those responding agreed with Katherine Asaif, a Colorado Springs, Colo., schoolteacher, who rejected such ideas. "I understand why people want to come to the United States," she said. "But it does seem to be rewarding the law-breaking."

                    Establishing a program to import future guest workers drew more modest support, with 54% of those polled supporting and 21% opposing it. Vivian Richardson, a nurse's assistant who lives outside Raleigh, N.C., believes guest workers are necessary because they perform jobs "Americans don't want to do anymore," such as working in fields or poultry plants.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Aliba are you white?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        just curious dont take it the question the wrong way.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Why do you need to know his skin color/ethnicity?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            This board has so many racists, but its the Mexicans who piss me off the most!

                            Am not racist though.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The Latimes article title says it all " MOST BACKS TIGHTER BORDER WITH GUEST WORKER PLAN"

                              Every single article and polls clearly shows the public is for the guest worker program with a pass to citizenship.

                              Comment

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