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Immigration Frustration

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  • Immigration Frustration

    The immigration debate can be summed up in a single word: frustration.

    There's frustration on this side of the border from Americans who are rightly asking why a great nation can't control its southern boundary. And there's frustration in Mexico City from a president who sees the worst in American isolationist sentiments playing out in the Congress.

    Mexican President Vicente Fox is angrily opposing a House-approved immigration bill, which, among other things, authorizes building fences along 700 miles of the 2,000-mile border between the United States and Mexico. Fox says the wall is an example of a "shameful" and troubling willingness in the United States to tolerate "xenophobic groups that impose the law at will."

    That's an overstatement that doesn't serve well the immigration discussion in Washington. If anything, it risks hardening attitudes and widening the distance between true immigration reform and security-only half measures. Fox would be better served to find ways to improve Mexico's economy in order to slow the pace of northern migration.

    As the U.S. debate now moves to the Senate, we urge lawmakers not to pass any legislation that calls for erecting a physical barrier between the United States and Mexico.

    Allowing workers to step from the shadows recognizes that they are a major part of the U.S. economy and protects them from exploitation. Another key provision is one that would require employers to verify Social Security numbers or face penalties for hiring illegal workers.

    A Senate proposal from Republican John McCain and a guest-worker plan backed by President Bush offer more realistic approaches than the idea of building a wall. Otherwise, immigration reform is a mirage

  • #2
    The immigration debate can be summed up in a single word: frustration.

    There's frustration on this side of the border from Americans who are rightly asking why a great nation can't control its southern boundary. And there's frustration in Mexico City from a president who sees the worst in American isolationist sentiments playing out in the Congress.

    Mexican President Vicente Fox is angrily opposing a House-approved immigration bill, which, among other things, authorizes building fences along 700 miles of the 2,000-mile border between the United States and Mexico. Fox says the wall is an example of a "shameful" and troubling willingness in the United States to tolerate "xenophobic groups that impose the law at will."

    That's an overstatement that doesn't serve well the immigration discussion in Washington. If anything, it risks hardening attitudes and widening the distance between true immigration reform and security-only half measures. Fox would be better served to find ways to improve Mexico's economy in order to slow the pace of northern migration.

    As the U.S. debate now moves to the Senate, we urge lawmakers not to pass any legislation that calls for erecting a physical barrier between the United States and Mexico.

    Allowing workers to step from the shadows recognizes that they are a major part of the U.S. economy and protects them from exploitation. Another key provision is one that would require employers to verify Social Security numbers or face penalties for hiring illegal workers.

    A Senate proposal from Republican John McCain and a guest-worker plan backed by President Bush offer more realistic approaches than the idea of building a wall. Otherwise, immigration reform is a mirage

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