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F1 Visa -> US Resident/Citizen??

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  • F1 Visa -> US Resident/Citizen??

    Hello everyone...I have been on an F1 Student Visa since 1993 and have just graduated from high school. I was wondering if it is possible for me to do/obtain the following.

    1. A work authorization (to help pay for college because I do not qualify for federal scholarships and to have a little more spending money).

    2. To change my student status to a State/US resident.

    3. Also, how can I become a citzen via my F1 Visa?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Hello everyone...I have been on an F1 Student Visa since 1993 and have just graduated from high school. I was wondering if it is possible for me to do/obtain the following.

    1. A work authorization (to help pay for college because I do not qualify for federal scholarships and to have a little more spending money).

    2. To change my student status to a State/US resident.

    3. Also, how can I become a citzen via my F1 Visa?

    Thanks

    Comment


    • #3
      F-1 is not a valid visa to study at public school, but you could have attended a private one.
      But did you spend all that time (1993-2007) studying in high-school?

      Per you questions:

      1. Under certain circumstances you could apply for EAD as F-1 student (i.e. change of fin. circumstances of sponsor and such).
      You could also get permission to work 20 hr/wk from your school adviser/councel (you need to talk to them about it).

      2. Yes, under the Congressionally enacted statutes of INA it's possible

      3. Consult an immigration attorney

      Comment


      • #4
        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Swades:
        Hello everyone...I have been on an F1 Student Visa since 1993 and have just graduated from high school. I was wondering if it is possible for me to do/obtain the following.

        1. A work authorization (to help pay for college because I do not qualify for federal scholarships and to have a little more spending money).

        2. To change my student status to a State/US resident.

        3. Also, how can I become a citzen via my F1 Visa?

        Thanks </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
        I think you mean 2003 on F1 visa. could you please comment.

        2. As a college student, you can work on campus. Off campus will require USCIS approval and will be based on economic hardship.

        3. State law will determine to change your status. As a F student visa holder, you will pay the out of state or international rates. You might be able to change if the school or university grants you as a resident of the state. You can obtain this either by receiving a fellowship or scholarship; or the school has permission from the state to grant some students to state residents. But these are few and far between.

        4. The only way to become a citizen through a F visa is to marry a USC, have your USC spouse apply for adjustment of status, get the green card, and wait 3 years once you have obtained your green card to apply for citizenship.
        "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

        Comment


        • #5
          <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RationalE:
          F-1 is not a valid visa to study at public school, but you could have attended a private one.
          But did you spend all that time (1993-2007) studying in high-school?

          Per you questions:

          1. Under certain circumstances you could apply for EAD as F-1 student (i.e. change of fin. circumstances of sponsor and such).
          You could also get permission to work 20 hr/wk from your school adviser/councel (you need to talk to them about it).

          2. Yes, under the Congressionally enacted statutes of INA it's possible

          3. Consult an immigration attorney </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

          Lol...no I did not spend more than a decade in high school. I began elementry school in 1993 and continued my education. Also, can you clarify your answer a little more?

          1. "Under certain circumstances you could apply for EAD as F-1 student " What are these circumstances?

          2. "Congressionally enacted statutes of INA." I don't understand what this is.

          Thanks

          Comment


          • #6
            To Hudson:

            I've been studying with an F1 Visa since 1993 (kept renewing). Also, hwo do I know if my university has permission from the state to grant students to state residency?

            Will marrying a USC really allow me to become a citizen more easily and will I run into any trouble with USCIS?

            Thanks

            Comment


            • #7
              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Swades:
              To Hudson:

              I've been studying with an F1 Visa since 1993 (kept renewing). Also, hwo do I know if my university has permission from the state to grant students to state residency?

              Will marrying a USC really allow me to become a citizen more easily and will I run into any trouble with USCIS?

              Thanks </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
              When you submit your application to attend a university in the US, they will send you a completed I-20 form as indication you are accepted. Once you have the I-20 form, then you could file the I-765, which is the work authorization to work off campus. There, you will indicate that economic hardship. The I-20 does allow you to work on campus. There will be stamp on the I-20 indicating that. However, in order to attend the university under the F1 visa, your parents must show they can pay for the first full year of college expenses. You can apply for scholarships or fellowships, but not federal subsidized grants or financial aid.

              As for state residency, contact the international office in the university you are going to attend. They will give you the guidelines. It should also be noted on their web site as well.
              "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

              Comment


              • #8
                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Lol...no I did not spend more than a decade in high school. I began elementry school in 1993 and continued my education. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                Two things I may note:

                1. F-1 status (not visa) is valid for up to 8 years (can be renewed for up to 8 years by school issuing I-20).
                Then one would have to either change the status or leave the country.

                2. It's the first time I hear that F-1 was utilized to study in elementary school

                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Also, can you clarify your answer a little more?

                1. "Under certain circumstances you could apply for EAD as F-1 student " What are these circumstances? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                It could be "change of fin. circumstances of sponsor and such".
                You would need to read forms, talk to USCIS or Immigration Attorney for clarifications. I am not an attorney.

                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">2. "Congressionally enacted statutes of INA." I don't understand what this is.
                Thanks </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                It simply means "under the existing law".


                You are welcome

                Comment

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