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  • Diversity is our strenght

    Diversity is strength.

    That sentiment has in recent years emerged as an article of faith in American public life.

    ''Most everybody says, 'Yes, I'm in favor of diversity and I really like multiculturalism,' because in school and at work, Americans are taught to value difference, and they know by now that a positive reaction to diversity is the culturally acceptable answer. But if there's nothing to pull people together they get kind of nervous. And they really can't articulate where to draw the line,'' said Joseph Gerteis, a sociologist with the University of Minnesota's American Mosaic Project, which is probing how Americans think about questions of diversity and solidarity.

    The Mosaic work is complemented by a massive national study by Harvard sociologist Robert Putnam, who reports that in the face of large-scale immigration, many Americans are overwhelmed by diversity. Putnam calls it ''socio-psychological system overload.'' With stunning regularity, he found Americans in more diverse locales tending to ''hunker down and pull in like a turtle,'' suspicious not just of the new or different, but of everybody.

    ''They don't trust their neighbors or shop clerks, they are not as involved in the community,'' Putnam said. ''The only two things that go up as diversity rises are protest marches and TV watching.''

    ''Black or white, happy multiculturalist or ambivalent realist, Americans of all stripes see it as a problem if there are simply groups with no national culture to unify them,'' they wrote.

    In 2002, economists Dora Costa at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Matthew Kahn at Tufts University surveyed 15 recent economics papers on the impact of diversity on social capital and found that all had ''the same punch line: heterogeneity reduces civic engagement. In more diverse communities, people participate less as measured by how they allocate their time, their money, their voting and their willingness to take risks to help others.''

    ''We looked at how often people played sports, go to church, sing in the choir, what organizations they belong to, how much do they trust their neighbors and shop clerks, how many friends do they have and how often do they see their friends,'' Putnam said.

    ''We were shocked,'' he said. ''It hits you between the eyes.''

    Communities with the most immigrants and greatest diversity were at the bottom of the social capital indexes. ''When you look at places that were high on trust, it was places like Bismarck, N.D., and the state of New Hampshire, and a whole bunch of smaller, more ethnically homogeneous places ... Down at the bottom were places like Los Angeles, Houston and Atlanta.''

    http://www.statesman.com/opinion/content/editorial/stor...rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=45
    A diversity divide

  • #2
    Diversity is strength.

    That sentiment has in recent years emerged as an article of faith in American public life.

    ''Most everybody says, 'Yes, I'm in favor of diversity and I really like multiculturalism,' because in school and at work, Americans are taught to value difference, and they know by now that a positive reaction to diversity is the culturally acceptable answer. But if there's nothing to pull people together they get kind of nervous. And they really can't articulate where to draw the line,'' said Joseph Gerteis, a sociologist with the University of Minnesota's American Mosaic Project, which is probing how Americans think about questions of diversity and solidarity.

    The Mosaic work is complemented by a massive national study by Harvard sociologist Robert Putnam, who reports that in the face of large-scale immigration, many Americans are overwhelmed by diversity. Putnam calls it ''socio-psychological system overload.'' With stunning regularity, he found Americans in more diverse locales tending to ''hunker down and pull in like a turtle,'' suspicious not just of the new or different, but of everybody.

    ''They don't trust their neighbors or shop clerks, they are not as involved in the community,'' Putnam said. ''The only two things that go up as diversity rises are protest marches and TV watching.''

    ''Black or white, happy multiculturalist or ambivalent realist, Americans of all stripes see it as a problem if there are simply groups with no national culture to unify them,'' they wrote.

    In 2002, economists Dora Costa at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Matthew Kahn at Tufts University surveyed 15 recent economics papers on the impact of diversity on social capital and found that all had ''the same punch line: heterogeneity reduces civic engagement. In more diverse communities, people participate less as measured by how they allocate their time, their money, their voting and their willingness to take risks to help others.''

    ''We looked at how often people played sports, go to church, sing in the choir, what organizations they belong to, how much do they trust their neighbors and shop clerks, how many friends do they have and how often do they see their friends,'' Putnam said.

    ''We were shocked,'' he said. ''It hits you between the eyes.''

    Communities with the most immigrants and greatest diversity were at the bottom of the social capital indexes. ''When you look at places that were high on trust, it was places like Bismarck, N.D., and the state of New Hampshire, and a whole bunch of smaller, more ethnically homogeneous places ... Down at the bottom were places like Los Angeles, Houston and Atlanta.''

    http://www.statesman.com/opinion/content/editorial/stor...rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=45
    A diversity divide

    Comment


    • #3
      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Malinsky:
      Diversity is strength.

      That sentiment has in recent years emerged as an article of faith in American public life.

      ''Most everybody says, 'Yes, I'm in favor of diversity and I really like multiculturalism,' because in school and at work, Americans are taught to value difference, and they know by now that a positive reaction to diversity is the culturally acceptable answer. But if there's nothing to pull people together they get kind of nervous. And they really can't articulate where to draw the line,'' said Joseph Gerteis, a sociologist with the University of Minnesota's American Mosaic Project, which is probing how Americans think about questions of diversity and solidarity.

      The Mosaic work is complemented by a massive national study by Harvard sociologist Robert Putnam, who reports that in the face of large-scale immigration, many Americans are overwhelmed by diversity. Putnam calls it ''socio-psychological system overload.'' With stunning regularity, he found Americans in more diverse locales tending to ''hunker down and pull in like a turtle,'' suspicious not just of the new or different, but of everybody.

      ''They don't trust their neighbors or shop clerks, they are not as involved in the community,'' Putnam said. ''The only two things that go up as diversity rises are protest marches and TV watching.''

      ''Black or white, happy multiculturalist or ambivalent realist, Americans of all stripes see it as a problem if there are simply groups with no national culture to unify them,'' they wrote.

      In 2002, economists Dora Costa at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Matthew Kahn at Tufts University surveyed 15 recent economics papers on the impact of diversity on social capital and found that all had ''the same punch line: heterogeneity reduces civic engagement. In more diverse communities, people participate less as measured by how they allocate their time, their money, their voting and their willingness to take risks to help others.''

      ''We looked at how often people played sports, go to church, sing in the choir, what organizations they belong to, how much do they trust their neighbors and shop clerks, how many friends do they have and how often do they see their friends,'' Putnam said.

      ''We were shocked,'' he said. ''It hits you between the eyes.''

      Communities with the most immigrants and greatest diversity were at the bottom of the social capital indexes. ''When you look at places that were high on trust, it was places like Bismarck, N.D., and the state of New Hampshire, and a whole bunch of smaller, more ethnically homogeneous places ... Down at the bottom were places like Los Angeles, Houston and Atlanta.''

      http://www.statesman.com/opinion/content/editorial/stor...rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=45
      A diversity divide </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
      Well, your comprehension skills still have not improved. According to the editorial you provided, here is what Dr. Mather said, "According to an analysis by Mather, those states with the biggest gap in the proportions of the older and younger populations spent the lowest share of their economies on public education. The three most racially homogenous states "” Maine, Vermont and West Virginia "” had the highest proportional spending on higher education."

      That is a big contrast to what you claimed about the largest metropolitan areas, yet I did not see NYC on that list.
      "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

      Comment


      • #4
        This means diverity among WHITE CHRISAINS; Russians, Germans, English, French, Polish; NOT BLACKS, NOT MOSLEMS, NOT JEWS

        GOD BLESS AMERICA AND NO ONE ELSE !!!!!!!!!!!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Much depends on one's perspective.
          Few ever rise above.

          Comment

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