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  • #16
    LegalNut

    You are asking a question that I already answered in this thread... and to keep it this time short. My case does not fall under 3/10 yrs bar, due to the D/S note on my I94. Which DOS considers it not to be unlwafully present - until USCIS officer or immigration judge makes the determination that I fell out of status (the clock never starts until that happens to be the case).

    So if I leave the country quietly, under the radar, CP should not be a problem, because DOS itself is in charge of my CP, even if the consular post has immigration judge, the law will be applied to my case... even though the only risk involved is, a clueless officer interviews me and rejects my case with a poor knowledge for DOS's unlwaful presence memo.

    The issue about AOS - even though my petition was filed before 4/30/2001, I didn't come to the US until 6/2001. Which means, I will not be eligible for 245i Physical Presence Condition (12/20/2000). So, no solution for me there.

    Comment


    • #17
      Some research on inadmissibility of immigrant visa through CP.

      Source: http://www.immserve.com/cons_pro.htm



      Inadmissibility Grounds, Police Reports and Medical Exam Forms

      There are more than 30 grounds for the State Department to deny immigrant visas to foreign nationals. They are presumed to exist unless and until the prospective immigrant overcomes them. For example, if the alien has been a saboteur, a prostitute, a Nazi, or a stowaway, the immigrant visa could be denied. These grounds typically are easily overcome. The alien simply checks the appropriate boxes on the OF-230 form indicating their absence.

      The three most important potential grounds of inadmissibility – closely examined by the State Department in every application for an immigrant visa -- are: (1) public charge; (2) criminal convictions; and (3) communicable diseases. Overcoming these grounds requires more work. Specifically, the alien must prepare or produce appropriate supporting forms and documentation, as follows:

      Public Charge: An Affidavit of Support, INS Form I-864, with corroborating tax returns and employer letter. This is submitted to the NVC at Step 3 on the preceding chart. It is fairly lengthy and complex. It must be accompanied by (1) the principal alien's U.S. federal tax returns for the preceding three years (to the extent applicable); and (2) proof of current employment (i.e., employer letter) or self-employment.



      Criminal Convictions: A Police Report or Records Check for each prospective immigrant age 16 or older. The Reports are required from each country in which the applicant has lived for 6 months or longer since his or her 16th birthday. In Canada, for example, the Police Reports must be obtained from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in Ottowa, using the National Registry. Local police clearance certificates will not suffice. Note that prospective immigrants undergoing CP are not required to submit fingerprint cards or obtain FBI clearance for any period of time they may have spent inside the United States (presumably in valid nonimmigrant status) before applying for immigrant status. Police Reports are likewise submitted to the NVC at Step 3 on the preceding chart.



      Communicable Diseases: An INS Medical Exam and supporting INS Form I-693. This can only be obtained from an authorized physician in the applicant's home country. The NVC provides a list of all authorized physicians throughout the worker's home country as part of the Packet 3 at Step 2 on the preceding chart. Typically, the medical exams are completed and the sealed INS Form I-693 is secured from the examining physician just prior to the consular appointment. The sealed medical exam is then hand-carried by the applicants to their visa interviews. For the medical exams to be successful, all family members must document that they have secured the appropriate innoculations for vaccine-preventable diseases. See the concluding Part V of this Memo.

      Comment


      • #18
        Update:

        1/5/2005 - I called NVC to request I864 fee application.

        1/18/2005 - Received the I864 fee application and DS-3032 form (choice of agent). Returned the I864 fee form with a money order ($65) the same day to NVC @ St. Louis, Montana (overnight mail). DS-3032 cannot be completed at this point, the agent (my attorney) is on freaking holiday (just when you needed him ).


        It should take 20-30days to process the fee, and get the I864 (Affidavit of Support application) by late February. Hopefully, DS-3032 form will go out next week (last week of January). Once NVC receives DS-3032, they send out the IV fee ($335) to the agent, that also will be around mid to late February.

        So far so good.

        Comment


        • #19
          Anyone have any idea what the timeline from here is like, until the interview?

          thanks

          Comment


          • #20
            Here is some info about NVC - for anyone who is curious/interested about what the NVC does for a living. Very, very, very, very... helpful info from Matthew Udall (thank you Mr. Udall ).

            Source: Matthew Udall notes from his tour of the National Visa Center on 09/30/04

            In August 2004, The American Immigration Lawyers Association announced that for the first time the Vermont Service Center was allowing non-East Coast AILA members to tour the Vermont Service Center. I immediately signed up for one of the tour slots. Since I was going to be traveling across the United States to tour the VSC, I contacted AILA HQ and asked if they could possibly arrange a tour of the National Visa Center as well. AILA HQ replied saying that this was a good idea, and they would see what they could do. Shortly thereafter I was happy to see an announcement from AILA that they were able to arrange a meeting and tour of the National Visa Center for up to 35 AILA members. This was the first tour of the NVC ever offered to AILA members, so I also signed up for one of the few slots available for this meeting and tour of the NVC.

            I flew in to Manchester, New Hampshire on 09/29/04, a day before the NVC tour in order to give me a day in which to do a little sightseeing. After a quick trip up to the White Mountains National Park to take a ride on the old Mt. Washington Cog Railroad, I made my way back down to Portsmouth, New Hampshire in order to attend the NVC tour on the following day.

            The National Visa Center (Formerly the TVPIC) used to be located in Washington DC but was moved to its current location in Portsmouth, New Hampshire 10 years ago. The building of the NVC is actually the old "Commissary" for the Pease Air Force Base that used to be located on that property. It's not that large of a building, and they process an amazing about of work through that small facility. Across the street from the NVC is the National Passport Center.

            There were around 20 (more or less... I didn't do a head count) AILA members who attended this event and there was one other California AILA member in attendance (who practices in San Francisco). The other AILA members in attendance were for the most part, attorneys practicing in cities on the East Coast.

            The first thing they did was to have each AILA member sign in and put on our "Guest" identification badges. After that, they led us into their conference room where a few preliminary introductions were made before beginning the tour. The official Q & A meeting took place after the tour of the facility.

            For privacy reasons, I'm not going to list the names of the officers at the NVC, and instead will just use initials. The Director of the NVC (D.T.) introduced himself and some of his top staff members, including F.M. (The Operations Director and Lead for SI International – the Contractor for the NVC), and D.W. (The FBI Agent in charge of doing the fingerprint checks at the NVC, and who relocated from the West Virginia Fingerprint Lab). There were a couple of other NVC officers in attendance as well. The Director mentioned he was pleased to have us in attendance and mentioned that meeting with us was a good way to help them identify problems or issues where they had room for improvement.

            There are six government employees stationed at the NVC (all top positions). The Director and the Deputy Director are "Foreign Service" employees and rotate to different positions every three years. As mentioned above, SI International is the contractor for the NVC, and when the NVC was formed there were approximately 75 contract workers. The number of contract workers has been increased over the years, and now totals approximately 300 contract employees working at the NVC.

            Due to the backlog reduction efforts being made by the USCIS, the workload at the NVC has doubled since July of 2004. Before July 2004, the NVC would receive in the neighborhood of 5,000 to 10,000 cases per week from the USCIS, but they are now receiving approximately 15,000 to 25,000 (or more) cases per week. The bulk of the current increased workload at the NVC consists mainly of I-130 immediate relative cases. They have a "second shift" working at the NVC now, and they are able to keep up with the workload since they are able to hire from the private sector to meet the demand. It was mentioned that they don't want a backlog to develop at the NVC.

            The NVC processes I-130s - Family Based, I-140s - Employment Based, I-129fs - K-1 Fiancee, I-129fs - K-3/4 Life Act, I-600/A - Orphan, I-730s - Asylee/Refugee, I-529s - Investment & I-360s - Special Immigrant.

            The NVC currently has approximately 2,000,000 files in their file room. The Director mentioned that there was an effort to increase the use automation to make more of the process based on e-filing (and he mentioned that he wished all of their work was based around e-filing), but 9/11 has slowed down the "reinvention" process. (Note: Every time the file is transferred to a new section of the NVC, the barcode is scanned so that the specific location is known at all times and the file may be easily retrieved if necessary).

            Types of Processing: There are basically four types of processing performed at the NVC. Initial, Expedite, Standard Review & Appointment Review.

            *Initial Processing: The NVC performs initial processing on all petitions received from the USCIS
            Step 1: Sort the petitions into three categories; expedites, current and non-current based on the visa classification and the priority date.
            Step 2: Enter the petition data into the NVC database. About half of the information on the petition is already in the database because it was entered by the USCIS and forwarded to the NVC electronically through a data share program.
            Step 3: Assign a case number based on where the applicant will receive their visa interview. The case number consists of the 3 letter post designation, the Julian date (+500) and the number of petitions assigned to that post on that day.

            *Expedite Processing: Expedite cases fall into the following petition types; I-129f, I-129, I-730 & I-600/A. These petitions are processed through NVC and sent to the post within one week unless a Security Advisory Opinion (SAO) is necessary for the applicant (K applicants only). For applicants that require a SAO, the NVC will send the petition to the post upon receipt of the clearance. (Note that some USCIS District Offices may send I-600/A orphan petitions directly to the Consulate, bypassing NVC processing.

            *Standard Review: There are two basic types of review, standard review and review where the NVC will schedule the appointment at the post. Each post where the NVC does not perform the scheduling function is considered a standard review post. Once the case is current, there are several steps to the standard review process for cases with an attorney designated as the agent.
            Step 1: The Immigrant Visa Application processing fee bill and the Affidavit of Support processing fee bill are mailed to the attorney of record 2 - 4 weeks from the receipt of a current case from the USCIS.
            Step 2: The attorney returns to St. Louis in the envelope provided the affidavit of support payment and fee bill and the Immigrant Visa Application payment and fee bill. Fees must be paid by a certified check of money order.
            Step 3: The Lock Box in St. Louis processes the payment and forwards the fee payment information to the NVC.
            Step 4: A packet of forms and instructions are mailed to the attorney of record. The packet consists of the following; Form I-864 Affidavit of Support, DS-230 Part 1, and Instructions for Immigration Visa Applicants.
            Step 5: The attorney completes the necessary forms and compiles the necessary documents necessary for the I-864 Affidavit of Support. The attorney returns all documents and forms to the NVC (including the bar-coded sheet with the case number).
            Step 6: NVC reviews all of the documents and forms for completeness. A checklist letter may be sent for missing or incomplete information (The Director mentioned they don't usually have to send this follow up letter in attorney prepared cases).
            Step 7: The case record is qualified if all of the required forms and documents have been received. The electronic data and physical case files are forwarded to the post via DHL.

            *Appointment Review: Appointment review is based on the post where the applicant will be processed. Once the case is current, there are several staps to the appointment review process for cases with an attorney designated as the agent. With some exceptions, the remaining steps are exactly as stated in the standard review listed above.
            Step 4: A packet of forms and instructions are mailed to the attorney. The packet consists of the following; I-864 Affidavit of Support, DS-230 Part 2, and Instructions for Immigrant Visa Applicant.
            Step 5: The attorney completes the necessary forms and compiles the necessary supporting documents (tax returns, w2s, job letter/pay stubs, original or certified copies of birth and marriage certificates, etc.). The attorney returns all documents and forms to the NVC, including the bar-coded sheet with the case number.
            Step 6: NVC reviews all of the documents and forms for completeness. A checklist letter may be sent for missing or incomplete information.
            Step 7: The case record is qualified if all the required forms and documents have been received. If visa number allocation is needed, the NVC requests it from the Department of State.
            Step 8: The NVC schedules the immigrant visa appointment and sends the appointment letter to the attorney along with a physician list. The electronic data and physical case files are forwarded to the post via DHL.

            Document Collection & Review: The NVC has been collecting documents on behalf of the posts since 1996. Because the NVC is not authorized to perform adjudicatory functions, the review is clerical only. The process has expanded over the years to provide necessary support to the posts overseas.

            Currently there are two types of review performed at the NVC as described above; Standard Review and Appointment Review. The NVC collects the following documents: Agent of choice form DS-3032 (only collected for cases where there is not a G-28 Attorney Of Record form on file with the petition), Affidavit of Support fee invoices, Immigrant Visa Application fee invoices, I-864 and all supporting documentation, tax waiver form, DS-230 Part 1, *DS-230 Part 2, *Civil Documents - birth certificates, marriage certificates, etc., *Police certificates (* is for documents that are collected for appointment posts only).

            Scheduling Appointments: The NVC has been scheduling appointments for posts since the pilot program with the U.S. Consulate in Montreal, Canada in 1996. Only applicants that are part of a case that is documentarily qualified will meet the requirements to be scheduled for a visa interview by the NVC.

            Documentarily Qualified: In order for a case to become documentarily qualified, the following criteria must be met; DS-230 Part 1 and 2 present for the principle applicant and each applicant traveling with the principle applicant, I-864 and supporting documentation (if required due to the visa classification), and security namechecks completed as required.

            Preference vs. Non-Preference Cases: There are two categories of visa classifications that will impact the applicant's availability to be scheduled;
            Preference - Numerically limited issuance. Applicants in a preference visa classification must be reported to the Visa Office and meet the cutoff date requirements before they can be scheduled for an appointment. Preference applicants from newly qualified cases are reported to the Visa Office once a month.
            Non-Preference - not numerically limited. Qualified applicants will be picked up for scheduling right up to the time the NVC runs the scheduling function.

            Scheduling: Applicants are scheduled for their visa interview the month prior to the month the interview will take place. All preference applicants that are scheduled have had a visa allocated to them by the Visa Office.

            Notification and the File Transfer to the Post: The NVC will send out the appointment letter when the scheduling function is complete. The physical case files and the electronic data will be sent to the post as well.

            Once these preliminary introductions were made, the Director, F.M. (the SI Lead), the FBI officer, another NVC officer or two and an armed guard escorted us through the facility. Please note that the stops along the way on the tour were not necessarily the order in which a case would be processed through the NVC, and instead the order of areas shown to us was dictated by the physical lay out of the facility. My notes below are based on the order of areas we passed through during the tour.

            Our first stop was the "Loading Bay" (or shipping area). This is where they receive boxes of cases from the Service Centers, and is also where they box and ship cases to the U.S. Embassies. It was mentioned that since the NVC is located in close proximity to the VSC, naturally they receive case files from the VSC very quickly compared to the files sent from the other Service Centers. The NVC receives shipments of cases on a daily basis. They send files to over 150 U.S. Embassies per week, and they ship using DHL. They mentioned that while it might only take 3 to 4 days for a shipment to reach the country of destination, those shipments might take a while to make it through customs for those countries (a delay which is outside the control of the NVC).

            The next stop was the "Packet Control" area where they generate and mail the first letters for cases. Like the other service centers, they have a machine that folds these letters and stuffs them into the envelopes, however there are some letters that need to be handled and mailed by contract workers when a case is going to a specific U.S. Embassy that requires unique forms.

            The next stop was the "Receipt In" area where they receipt in the petitions and enter data into their computers. They "wand" in information that is sent from the Service Centers; about 50% of the data is entered into the system immediately via this wand process (About half of the information on the petition is already in the database because it was entered at the Service Centers and forwarded to the NVC electronically through a data share program). Additional data is entered into the computer at a different stage of the process.

            One of the top staffers pulled a couple of case files from their boxes to show us the barcodes that are included on some of the forms sent from the NVC. It was mentioned how important it was for us to use the forms with the barcodes (that is, if we are interested in having the case processed as quickly as possible). Forms that arrive that don't contain the barcode will require a contract worker to take extra steps in order to generate a new barcode to affix to the form (and this extra step will cause an additional delay). If one gets a form from a forms program that does not contain the bar code, and if one then "obtains the form with the bar code" from the NVC (by the time one is ready to send forms to the NVC), they recommend we attach the forms sent by the NVC (containing the barcode) to the other form (that does not have a barcode) so they can identify these cases immediately and wand in the information rather that having the case experience the additional delay.

            I do a lot of K visa work, so naturally my questions were geared towards those types of cases. They confirmed that they receive K-3 petitions from the NBC (National Benefits Center), and when they arrive the receipt number is entered first into their system (so they will be able to track the case) even before the data is entered into the computer. They receive the entire case file, not just a portion of the case file.

            I asked the FBI fingerprint officer if they run IBIS checks at the NVC. He said they don't run IBIS checks at the NVC (IBIS checks are preformed at the Service Centers), however the NVC performs an NCIC name check when the DS-230 is returned to the NVC, and if there is a hit, than they will require fingerprints to be taken.

            I asked what the turn around time is for a typical K-1, K-3 case in getting it on it's way to the U.S. Consulate, and they mentioned that these case types are expedited at the NVC and usually are on their way to the Post within 5 days of arrival at the NVC.

            The NVC schedules the appointments for 33 U.S. Consulates (But not for K-1 or K-3 cases), and the NVC sends letters to people for cases that will process through these U.S. Consulates. They currently don't schedule the appointments for the U.S. Consulate in Manila, Philippines however they will soon start scheduling for Manila and they are currently gearing up to handle that task.

            The 33 Posts for which the NVC currently (as of the date of my visit to the NVC) schedules appointment are:
            Abu Dhabi, UAE
            Abidjan, Cote D'Ivoire
            Accra, Ghana
            Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
            Algiers, Algeria
            Ankara, Turkey
            Antananarivo, Madagascar
            Asmara, Eritrea
            Cotonou, Benin
            Cairo, Egypt
            Casablanca, Morocco
            Djibouti, Djibouti
            Dakar, Senegal
            Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania
            Freetown, Sierra Leone
            Harare, Zimbabwe
            Johannesburg, South Africa
            Khartoum, Sudan (files go to CRO)
            Kinshasa, Congo (Inactive)
            Lagos, Nigeria
            Libreville, Gabon
            Lilongwe, Malawi
            Lome, Togo
            Lusaka, Zambia
            Monrovia, Liberia
            Montreal, Canada
            Niamey, Niger
            Nairobi, Kenya
            Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
            Praia, Cape Verde
            Tirana, Albania
            Tunis, Tunisia
            Yaounde, Cameroon

            The next stop on the tour was at the "Case Creation" unit. This is where the remaining 50% of the data is entered into the computer and where a case number is assigned. They also double-check the USCIS data during this process. They explained the format for their case numbers: The first 3 characters represent which Embassy the case will go to, after that is the Julian Date plus five hundred and something. For example, 527 indicates the 27th case processed that given day at the NVC for that given Embassy.

            The next stop was the "Quality Control" unit (Preference cases go from Case Creation to the file room, but other cases go to the quality control unit). At quality control someone double-checks everything (second set of eyes). Once quality control is complete, the 1st correspondence is sent.

            The next stop was the "Current Mail Review" section (this is after the fees are paid and the forms come back to the NVC). The I-864 is physically matched with the file. They review the returned forms, but they don't make decisions in this unit. Once they get the affidavit of support and if they need more information or documentation, they will send "1" notice asking for information or documentation to cure the problem (they used to send 2 notices, but they found the 2nd notice really didn't add enough in getting problems corrected to justify continuing this practice). If the requested information or documentation does not arrive to the NVC within 60 days, they forward the file package to the post. The Director mentioned that they usually don't have problems (in this regard) with attorney prepared cases. (Note, the most common mistakes they see are missing or incomplete tax returns for the last 3 years, missing w2 forms for all 3 years, and missing employment letters).

            When fees arrive to the St. Louis lockbox, they send same day data transfer to the NVC of the fee billed and verification of the dollar amount sent (Note: In a non-current cases at the NVC, if applicable, one needs to notify the NVC that an upgrade has occurred. Non-current cases get put in the file cabinets until current).

            It was also pointed out that the Contract workers actually have the nice work stations near the windows in order to help keep up morale (managers get less desirable "interior" work spaces). There are no phone lines except for managers and team leaders, in order to help keep productivity at a high level (minimize distractions). They also have bonus incentives for productivity that are awarded every six months. They are under a "productivity" contract, not a "pay per hour" contract. The most recent bonus will be paid in October (2004) based on the productivity over the past six months.

            The next stop on the tour was in the "Document Review" section. There are two types of review: One for cases going to posts where the NVC "does not" schedule the appointment, and a second type of review for cases going to posts where the NVC "does" schedule the appointments (currently 33 posts, and increasing). (Note about appointment scheduling: Applicants are scheduled for their visa interview the month prior to the month the interview will take place. For example, applicants scheduled in November will have interviews in the month of December. All preference applicants that are scheduled have had a visa allocated to them by the Visa Office. The NVC will send out the appointment letter when the scheduling function is complete. The physical case files and the electronic data will be sent to the post as well).

            They gave us an e-mail address and fax number for attorneys to use when contacting the NVC about cases. Their goal is to reply within 24 hours for cases where a G-28 is on file. They told us what format to use in the subject line of the e-mail, and that we should ask about 1 case per e-mail so they can be more easily routed to the proper party or location.

            It was also mentioned that I-730 asylee relative petitions are also expedited (5 days).

            The next stop was at their "Telephone Service" unit. There are 15 to 23 people who take calls in that unit, plus 3 workers are assigned to take Congressional calls. They receive approximately 8,000 calls per week, and approximately 3,000 to 4,000 written inquiries. The NVC prefers e-mail inquiries. The call unit is staffed from 7:30 AM to 8:45 PM Eastern time. They have a first shift, a swing shift, and finally an evening shift. The Director made it a point to say that they don't want to become some sort of "call center".

            In light of the statement just made by the Director, I raised my hand to ask the Director a question. I told him that I've been participating in DIY'er news groups for a number of years now and mentioned that for the past year or so, the I-129f approval notices contain "template" language concerning the involvement of the NVC in getting cases to the post (although on the last couple of I-129f approval notices I've received, there is "new" template language which excludes any mention of the NVC's involvement) and that I bet they saw a rise in the level of calls once that language was added to the approval notices. I also mentioned to him that many news group participants put "timelines" on their postings showing the date the case made it to the NVC, and the date the NVC says the case has been sent to the post. I then asked, "In light of the fact that you don't want the NVC to turn into a call center, is there any particular message you want me to convey to my readers in the DIY community"? As the Director was thinking of his reply, F.M. spoke up and said, "Let your readers know that K-1 and K-3 cases usually only stay here at the NVC for one week, so there is really no need to call".

            The next stop along the tour was the "File Room" where they have sections for current and non-current cases. The cases are grouped together in the file room for each U.S. Embassy. Once they receive the DS-230 and I-864, the file goes to "Document Review" and then back to be sent to the Embassy.

            The NVC is currently trying to clear out files for people who are adjusting status rather than who will be going through consular processing, and they are sending those files to the National Records Center for storage.

            If one needs to add a spouse or dependents to a consular processing case, one needs to Contact the NVC to let them know.

            Finally, we stopped by the place where they box up the cases and ship them to the posts.

            That was the end of the tour, and while we were walking back to the conference room for the Q & A session, we passed by a small gym that they have at the facility. There were a couple of workers in there getting some exercise.

            There were many "employment based" case questions asked during the Q & A portion of the meeting, and since I don't focus on those types of cases, I'm not going to include notes concerning this, however I did ask a couple of follow up questions during the Q & A session concerning family based cases.

            I asked the FBI agent to clarify some things concerning their part of the process. There are different name checks performed during the immigrant visa process.
            IBIS: Performed by the USCIS
            NCIC: Criminal information check ran on all applicants over 16 by the NVC. NCIC is usually complete within 24 hours. If fingerprints are required based on the results, the applicant will be notified and should have them taken within 6 month of notification.
            Security Advisory Opinions (SAO): NVC performs a limited number of SAOs on applicants meeting specific criteria. Completion time varies on a case-by-case basis.
            Police certificates are valid for 12 months.

            I asked about the scheduling of visa appointments for K-1 & K-3 cases, and they replied that they don't schedule appointments for K-1 or K-3 cases for any of the posts.

            As for their prior statement that K-1 & K-3 cases are sent to the posts within 1 week of arrival at the NVC, I asked them if that is "always" the case, or if there were things that could slow down that process. They answered that there are instances where a clearance must come in first, so it is possible that these cases could experience additional delays.

            In the situation where a case is send back to the USCIS from the Consulate for reconsideration, that case comes back to the NVC, which then sends it back to the Service Center. If the case is reaffirmed by the Service Center, it gets sent back to the NVC for routing to the post. Approximately 2,000 cases are sent by the NVC to the Service Centers for revocation each month, and approximately 100 come back to the NVC as reaffirmed. The NVC is currently working with the USCIS to put notations on reaffirmed cases so that they can be identified more quickly and so they can get them routed to the posts quickly. Right now, the Service Centers send these reaffirmed cases to the NVC in boxes with regularly approved cases.

            They mentioned that the first letter from the NVC is usually sent out within 2 to 4 weeks from receiving the case from the Service Center. It was mentioned that China and India cases are expected to retrogress soon. It was also mentioned that they are pleased that the DV lottery submissions no longer go to the NVC, and instead go to the
            KCC.

            I mentioned that from my experience with the DIY community, the complaint I see most often is people saying they really just want to know more about the process and where their particular case is at in the process. I mentioned how informative these tours were for us, and asked if there was any way they could put together a "virtual tour" of the NVC with photos of the various steps a case takes along the way through the NVC with detailed explanations of what goes on in each step (as that might also help reduce the amount of time they have to spend taking calls at the call center). The Director thought that was a good idea, and they will take this suggestion into consideration.

            Beirut: The U.S. Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon will be reopening for processing immigrant visas in mid-November, 2004.

            After the tour, I thanked the Director and F.M. for meeting with us, and F.M. gave me his card so I could contact him in the future if needed. When returning home to California, I thought of a few more K follow up questions and e-mailed them to him. He replied saying he was going to pass my questions to the proper parties and will get back to me with their replies. When I receive their reply, I'll add that additional information to these notes.

            -//-

            11/08/04: I have received a reply from the NVC to my follow up K questions. Below are my questions and their replies.

            I-129f Letter: Does the NVC send the letter informing the petitioner that the case will soon be sent to the Consulate (This letter also includes the Consulate Case Number) to the petitioner, the attorney of record or both? Answer: The letter informing the petitioner that the I-129f file has been sent to the Consulate is sent to the petitioner. A copy is not sent to the attorney of record.

            I-129f Case Number Assignment: It seems that the NVC is now assigning the Consulate Case Number for I-129f K-1 cases. Is this the case for all I-129f K-1 cases for all U.S. Consulates, or is this just for I-129f K-1 cases that go to certain U.S. Consulates? If for just some of the Consulates, do you have a list of which ones? Answer: NVC assigns the Consulate Case Number to all K petitions that process through the NVC.

            K-1 Appointment Scheduling: Does the NVC also schedule K-1 visa interview appointments for some or all of the U.S. Consulates? If so, do you have a list of the U.S. Consulates for which you set the appointments in I-129f K-1 cases? Answer: The NVC does not schedule appointments for any K cases.

            K Files to Consulates: Does your office let a few case files "build up" (for a while) for a given U.S. Consulate before sending the files, or does your office send each file individually as soon as they pass the security name check by your FBI staffer? Answer: K cases are sent to the Consulates daily.

            Mailing Method for K cases: Does your office use a particular delivery method, such as the APO mailing system, "Consular Pouch", or perhaps Fed Ex of DHL in order to get the I-129f files to the U.S. Consulates? Does that answer change depending upon which U.S. Consulate you are shipping to? Answer: All files are sent to the post via DHL.

            Comment


            • #21
              MO: Who is your Attorney, and where is he?
              Will ypu please post his name and Address on this board.
              Thank you.

              Comment


              • #22
                Where are you located Adam?

                My attorney and family reside in the midwest, Columbus Ohio to be exact... I will post his name and adress if you are still interested in him.

                take care

                Comment


                • #23
                  Update:

                  1/5/2005 - I called NVC to request I864 fee application.

                  1/18/2005 - Received the I864 fee application and DS-3032 form (choice of agent). Returned the I864 fee form with a money order ($65) the same day to NVC @ St. Louis, Montana (overnight mail).

                  1/24/2005 - Mailed the DS-3032 (with barcode) to NVC (New Hampshire office) via overnight mail. It should take them about 3 weeks to send me the Immigrant Visa (IV) fee ($335).

                  More Later...

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    update:

                    1/5/2005 - NVC sent I864 fee.

                    1/18/2005 - Received the I864 fee application and DS-3032 form (choice of agent). Returned the I864 fee form with a money order ($65) the same day to NVC @ St. Louis, Montana (overnight mail).

                    1/19/2005 - St. Louis office received the I864 fee.

                    1/24/2005 - Mailed the DS-3032 (with barcode) to NVC (New Hampshire office) via overnight mail.

                    1/25/2005 - NVC received the DS-3032


                    Goal: Interview at the London Office by June 2005.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Mo View Post

                      One of the top staffers pulled a couple of case files from their boxes to show us the barcodes that are included on some of the forms sent from the NVC. It was mentioned how important it was for us to use the forms with the barcodes (that is, if we are interested in having the case processed as quickly as possible). Forms that arrive that don't contain the barcode will require a contract worker to take extra steps in order to generate a new barcode to affix to the form (and this extra step will cause an additional delay). If one gets a form from a forms program that does not contain the bar code, and if one then "obtains the form with the bar code" from the NVC (by the time one is ready to send forms to the NVC), they recommend we attach the forms sent by the NVC (scanning the barcode) to the other form (that does not have a barcode) so they can identify these cases immediately and wand in the information rather that having the case experience the additional delay.

                      I do a lot of K visa work, so naturally my questions were geared towards those types of cases. They confirmed that they receive K-3 petitions from the NBC (National Benefits Center), and when they arrive the receipt number is entered first into their system (so they will be able to track the case) even before the data is entered into the computer. They receive the entire case file, not just a portion of the case file.
                      Wow, your post deserves 1000+. You even used the barcode feature in the NVC, wow, nice!

                      Comment

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